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Russian-Turkish Rivalry over the Balkan and Caucasus Areas - JTM317
Anglický název: Russian-Turkish Rivalry over the Balkan and Caucasus Areas
Zajišťuje: Katedra ruských a východoevropských studií (23-KRVS)
Fakulta: Fakulta sociálních věd
Platnost: od 2021
Semestr: letní
E-Kredity: 6
Způsob provedení zkoušky: letní s.:
Rozsah, examinace: letní s.:1/1, Zk [HT]
Počet míst: 20 / neurčen (15)
Minimální obsazenost: neomezen
Virtuální mobilita / počet míst: ne
Stav předmětu: vyučován
Jazyk výuky: angličtina
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Poznámka: předmět je možno zapsat mimo plán
povolen pro zápis po webu
při zápisu přednost, je-li ve stud. plánu
Garant: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D.
Vyučující: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D.
Lamiya Panahova
Třída: Courses for incoming students
Anotace - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (13.01.2022)
Contemporary Russia-Turkey relations are marred by rivalry and occasional rapprochements in their traditional areas of influence of the Balkans, the Caucasus, the Middle East and Central Asia. Focusing on the former two areas, more particularly those of the Western Balkans and the South Caucasus – where their rivalry appears more intensive – this course considers the historical relations between the two states and examines their foreign policy positions and tools as well as their security interests and economic penetrations in these areas, including their individual interactions with some of countries there; namely, Albania, Kosovo, Serbia, Bosnia-Herzegovina as well as Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia. Drawing on a multi-disciplinary scholarship that deals with questions of ‘neo-imperialism’, geo-economics, geopolitics and cultural and historical relations, including policy papers and newspaper articles, on this rivalry and cooperation, the course aims at understanding the rationale (realism, constructivism) and the driving forces (security and national economy interests) behind their rivalry. This course also offers a great opportunity for comparisons to students to go deeper in their analysis of the modes of cooperation and tensions in each of these countries vis-à-vis Russia and Turkey.
Cíl předmětu - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (13.01.2022)
The course aims at understanding the rationale (realism, constructivism) and the driving forces (security and national economic interests) behind the rivalry of contempary Russia and Turkey in the Balkan and Caucasus areas. It also offers a great opportunity for comparisons to students to go deeper in their analysis of the modes of cooperation and tensions in the countries of these areas vis-à-vis Russia and Turkey.
Podmínky zakončení předmětu - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (13.01.2022)

A.   COURSE REQUIREMENTS  

1)     Attendance is mandatory as the course is designed as a seminar where substantial student participation is needed. Given the circumstances with COVID-19, the course might take place on-line via zoom.

2)     For every other class, a position paper of around 300 words should be prepared. Position papers should address a reading for the particular class. They should be done individually not as a group effort.

3)     To the 12th week’s class, a final paper of around 3000 words should be submitted to the lecturer.

4)     Active class participation – 20% position papers– 40% and final paper - 40%.  

 

B.   COURSE EVALUATION

A - "výborně - A" - "excellent - A"
B - "výborně - B" - "excellent - B"
C - "velmi dobře - C" - "very good - C"
D - "velmi dobře - D" - "very good - D"
E - "dobře - E" - "good - E"
F - "neprospěl/a - F" - "fail - F"

Last updated

13.01.2022

 

Literatura - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (13.01.2022)

 READING ASSIGNMENT  

1.     Historical Relations I (1500-1918): Ottoman & Russian Empires, the Balkans & the Caucasus

·       Brisku, Adrian, ‘Ottoman-Russian Relations’, Oxford Research Encyclopaedia of Asian History (2019), DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190277727.013.288

2.     Historical Relations II (1921-1991): Soviet Union, the Turkish Republic & Communism

·       Hurst, Samuel J., Onur Isci, ‘Smokestacks and Pipelines: Russian Turkish Relations and the Persistence of Economic Development’, Diplomatic History, Vol 4. Issue 5 (2020), pp. 834-859.

3.     Post-Cold War Rivalry I: ‘Great Power’ Foreign Policies

·       Hill, Fiona, ‘Seismic Shifts in Eurasia: The Changing Relationship between Turkey and Russia and its Implications for the South Caucasus’, South-east European and Black Sea Studies, 3(3), (2003), 55-75.

·       Bechev, Dimitar, ‘The Russian-Turkish Marriage of Convenience’, in Rival Power: Russia in Southeast Europe (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017), 139-178.

4.     Post-Cold War Rivalry II: Eurasianism & Regionalism

·       Sekcin, Kostem, ‘Different Paths to Regional Hegemony: National Identity Contestation and Foreign Economic Strategy in Russia and Turkey’, Review of International Political Economy 25(5) (2018), 726-751.

·       Morozova, Natalia, ‘Geopolitics, Eurasianism and Russian Foreign Policy under Putin’, Geopolitics, 14(4) (2009), 667-686.

·       Ben-Meir, Alon, ‘The Balkans: Feeding Russia’s and Turkey’s Hunger’, The Globalist: Thinking Globalisation, 19 March 2019. 

5.     Turkey in the Western Balkans: ‘Neo-Ottomanism’?

·       Taglia, Stefano, ‘Ottomanism Then and Now: Historical and Contemporary Meanings: An Introduction’, Die Welt Des Islams 56 (2016), pp. 279-289.

·       Demirta, Birgul, ‘Turkish Foreign Policy Towards the Balkans…’ Journal of Balkans and Near Eastern Studies 17(2), (2015), pp. 123-140.

·       Aydintasbas, Asli, ‘From Myth to Reality: How to Understand Turkey’s Role in the Western Balkans’, European Council in Foreign Relations, 13 March 2019.

6.     The Cases of Albania, Kosovo, Bosnia-Herzegovina & Serbia

·       Xhaferrim, Perparim, ‘Post-Ottoman Era: A Fresh Start for Bilateral Relations between Albania and Turkey?’ Australia and New Zealand Journal of European Studies, 9(1), 2017, pp. 42-42.

·       Mehmeti, Jeton, ‘The Economic and Social Investment of Turkey in Kosovo’, Adam Akademi, 1, 2012, pp. 97-106. 

·       Pavlevic, Dorde, ‘The Future of Trilateral Cooperation among Bosnia and Herzegovina, Turkey, Serbia’, Centre for Strategic Research, 2016, pp. 19-38.

7.     Russia in the Western Balkans: ‘Meddling’ & ‘Destabilising’

·       Stornski, Paul, Himes, Annie, ‘Russia’s Game in the Balkans’, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 6 January 2019.

8.     The Cases of Serbia & Bosnia-Herzegovina, Montenegro 

·       Vuksanovic, Vuk, ‘Serbs Are not “Little Russians”’, The American Interest, 26 July 2018; Samorukov, Maxim, ‘Escaping the Kremlin’s Embrace: Why Serbia Has Tired of Russia’s Support’, The Moscow Times, 22 January 2019.

·       Szerencses, L., Jensen, D., ‘The Master of Soft Power: Russia’s Role in Serbia, Bosnia Herzegovina, Montenegro, Macedonia and Kosovo’, Academic Journal of the Budapest Business School, 2(2), (2017), 67-94.

9.     Turkey in South Caucasus: Decline of Its ‘Soft Power’? 

·       Balci, Bayram, Liles, Thomas, ‘What Remains from Turkish Soft Power in the Caucasus’, Turkish Policy Quarterly, 24 April 2019.

10.  The Cases of Armenia, Azerbaijan & Georgia

·       Gamaghleyan, Philip, Sayan, Pinar, ‘The State of Armenia-Turkey Relations’, Heinrich Boll Stiftung, 1 October 2018.

·       Dikkaya, Mehmet, Strakes, James, ‘A Paradigm Shift in Turkish-Azerbaijani Relations?...’ Review of Socio-Economic Perspectives 2(1), June 2017, pp. 84-102.

·       Tvalodze, Salome, Adeishvili, Givi, ‘Georgia-Turkey Trade Relations: Challenges and Opportunities’, Konrad Adenauer Stiftung, 2016.   

11.  Russia in the South Caucasus: Controlling the ‘Near Abroad’ 

·       Abushov, Kavus, ‘Policing the Near Abroad: Russian Foreign Policy in the South Caucasus’, Australian Journal of International Affairs 63(2), (2009), 187-212.

12.  The Cases of Azerbaijan, Armenia & Georgia

·       Nurlan Alijev, „Russia’s Arms Sales: A Foreign Policy Tool in Relations With Azerbaijan and Armenia“, Eurasia Daily Monitor 15, č. 47 (2018), https://jamestown.org/program/russias-arms-sales-foreign-policy-tool-relations-azerbaijan-armenia/

·       Grigoryan, Armen, ‘Armenia: Joining under the Gun“, in Putin's Grand Strategy: The Eurasian Union and its Discontents, ed. S. Frederick Starr a Svante E. Cornell (Washington, D.C.: Johns Hopkins University-SAIS, 2014), 99, http://silkroadstudies.org/resources/1409GrandStrategy.pdf; Giragosian, Richard, ‘The 3G of Armenian-Russian Relations: Guns, Gas and Goods’, Vocal Europe (January 2018), https://www.vocaleurope.eu/the-3g-of-armenian-russian-relations-guns-gas-and-goods/

·       Brisku, Adrian, ‘Empires of Conquest and Civilisation in Georgian Political and Intellectual Discourse Since Late Nineteenth Century’, Intersection. EEJSP 2(2), (2016), pp. 34-51.

Metody výuky - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (09.02.2022)

The course is seminar-based which means that the lecturer will open up the discussion on the reading material of the week by laying out the main concepts and questions which will be followed by students' interventions and analytical discussions. 

 

Topic: JTM317 Russian-Turkish Rivalry over the Balkan and Caucasus Areas

Time: This is a recurring meeting Meet anytime

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https://cesnet.zoom.us/j/95431401968

Meeting ID: 954 3140 1968

 

 

Sylabus - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (21.01.2022)

Russian-Turkish Rivalry over the Balkan and Caucasus Areas

 (JTM 317) 

Associate Prof. Adrian Brisku with Doctoral Student Lamiya Panahova

Department of Russian & East European Studies, Charles University

https://cuni.academia.edu/adrianBrisku

adrian.brisku@fsv.cuni.cz; lamiyapanahova@gmail.com

Contemporary Russia-Turkey relations are marred by rivalry and occasional rapprochements in their traditional areas of influence of the Balkans, the Caucasus, the Middle East and Central Asia. Focusing on the former two areas, more particularly those of the Western Balkans and the South Caucasus – where their rivalry appears more intensive – this course considers the historical relations between the two states and examines their foreign policy positions and tools as well as their security interests and economic penetrations in these areas, including their individual interactions with some of countries there; namely, Albania, Kosovo, Serbia, Bosnia-Herzegovina as well as Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia. Drawing on a multi-disciplinary scholarship that deals with questions of ‘neo-imperialism’, geo-economics, geopolitics and cultural and historical relations, including policy papers and newspaper articles, on this rivalry and cooperation, the course aims at understanding the rationale (realism, constructivism) and the driving forces (security and national economy interests) behind their rivalry. This course also offers a great opportunity for comparisons to students to go deeper in their analysis of the modes of cooperation and tensions in each of these countries vis-à-vis Russia and Turkey.   

 

A.    COURSE DESIGN 

1.    Historical Relations I (1500-1918): Ottoman & Russian Empires & the Balkans and the Caucasus

2.    Historical Relations II (1921-1991): Soviet Union, the Turkish Republic, Communism

3.    Post-Cold War Rivalry I: ‘Great Power’ Foreign Policies

4.    Post-Cold War Rivalry II: Eurasianism and Regionalism

5.    Turkey in the Western Balkans: ‘Neo Ottomanism’?

6.    The Cases of Albania, Kosovo, Bosnia-Herzegovina & Serbia

7.    Russia in the Western Balkans: ‘Meddling’ & ‘Destabilising’

8.    The Cases of Serbia & Bosnia-Herzegovina, Montenegro

9.    Turkey in the South Caucasus: Decline of Its ‘Soft Power’

10.  The Cases of Azerbaijan, Armenia & Georgia

11.  Russia in the South Caucasus: Controlling the ‘Near Abroad’

12.  The Cases of Armenia, Azerbaijan & Georgia 

Last Updated 

21.01.2022

 
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