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Předmět, akademický rok 2019/2020
  
Liberalism in International Relations (TIR) - JPM690
Anglický název: Liberalism in International Relations (TIR)
Zajišťuje: Katedra mezinárodních vztahu (23-KMV)
Fakulta: Fakulta sociálních věd
Platnost: od 2019 do 2020
Semestr: zimní
Body: 4
E-Kredity: 4
Způsob provedení zkoušky: zimní s.:
Rozsah, examinace: zimní s.:0/1 KZ [hodiny/týden]
Počet míst: neurčen / 24 (25)
Minimální obsazenost: neomezen
Stav předmětu: vyučován
Jazyk výuky: angličtina
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Poznámka: předmět je možno zapsat mimo plán
povolen pro zápis po webu
při zápisu přednost, je-li ve stud. plánu
Garant: doc. PhDr. Jan Karlas, Ph.D., M.A.
Vyučující: doc. PhDr. Jan Karlas, Ph.D., M.A.
XK//Ve slož. korekvizitě pro: JPM043
Soubory Komentář Kdo přidal
stáhnout liberalism1920.pdf sylabus doc. PhDr. Jan Karlas, Ph.D., M.A.
Anotace - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. PhDr. Jan Karlas, Ph.D., M.A. (10.09.2019)
This course has a Moodle site available at https://dl1.cuni.cz/course/view.php?id=7872

All the mandatory readings are available at this Moodle site.




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Cíl předmětu - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. PhDr. Jan Karlas, Ph.D., M.A. (27.10.2019)

Students attending this course should:

- become familiar with the main ideas of liberalism as a current IR approach

- obtain an ability to analyze key international processes with the use of liberalism as one of the main theoretical approaches to IR

- be able to distinguish between divergent analytical perspectives on international relations and to formulate alternative explanations and substantiated arguments on the basis of these perspectives

Literatura - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. PhDr. Jan Karlas, Ph.D., M.A. (27.10.2019)

1. Liberalism in International Relations – an introduction (October 1)

Zacher, Mark – Matthew, Richard (1995) Liberal International Theory: Common Threads, Divergent Strands, in Kegley, Charles (ed.), Controversies in International Relations Theory: Realism and the Neoliberal Challenge, New York: St. Martin’s Press, you can read only pages 107-122

Moravcsik, Andrew (1997) Taking Preferences Seriously: A Liberal Theory of International Politics, International Organization, 51(4), you can read only pages 513-533

Walt, Stephen (1998) International Relations: One World, Many Theories, Foreign Policy, 110, 29-44

[in total 50 pages]

2. Liberalism and peace (October 15)

Oneal, John R., Bruce M. Russett (1997) The Classical Liberals Were Right: Democracy, Interdependence, and Conflict, 1950-1985, International Studies Quarterly, 41, you can read only pp. 267-272

 

Haas, Mark L. (2007) The United States and the End of the Cold War: Reactions to Soviet Power, Policies, or Domestic Politics? International Organization, 61(1), you can read only pp. 145-170

Hayes, Jarod (2009) Identity and Securitization in the Democratic Peace: The United States and the Divergence of Responses to India and Iran’s Nuclear Programmes, International Studies Quarterly, 53, pp. 977-999

[in total 52 pages]

3. Liberalism and trade policy (November 12)

Lake, David A. (2009) Open Economy Politics: A Critical Review, Review of International Organizations, 4, you can read only introduction and pp. 224-228

Hiscox, Michael J. (1999) The Magic Bullet? The RTAA, Institutional Reform, and Trade Liberalization, International Organization, 53(4), you can read only pp. 669-691

Conceicao-Heldt, Eugénia da (2013) Emerging Powers in the WTO Negotiations: The Domestic Sources of Trade Policy Preferences, The International Trade Journal 27(5), pp. 431-449

[in total 47 pages]

4. Liberalism and international negotiations (November 26)

Putnam, Robert D. (1988) Diplomacy and Domestic Politics: The Logic of Two-Level Games, International Organization, 42(3), 427-460

Lisowski, Michael (2002) Playing the Two-level Game: US President Bush’s Decision to Repudiate the Kyoto Protocol, Environmental Politics, 11(4), pp. 101-119

[in total 51 pages]

5. Liberalism and international institutions (December 10)

Hasenclever, Andreas, Peter Mayer, and Volker Rittberger (1997) Theories of International Regimes, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, chap. 3 Interest-based theories, you can read only pp. 23-44

Zangl, Bernhard (2008) Judicialization Matters! A Comparison of Dispute Settlement under GATT and the WTO, International Studies Quarterly, 52(4), pp. 825-854

[in total 50 pages]

6. Liberalism and transnational relations (January 7)

Keck, Margaret E., Kathryn Sikkink (1999) Transnational Advocacy Networks in International and Regional Politics, International Social Science Journal, 51(159), 89-101

 

Price, Richard (1998) Reversing the Gun Sights: Transnational Civil Society Targets Land Mines, International Organization, 52(3), 613-644, you can read only pp. 613-627

 

Munoz, Alejandro Anya (2009) Transnational and Domestic Processes in the Definition of Human Rights Policies in Mexico, Human Rights Quarterly, 31, 35-58

[in total 49 pages]

Metody výuky - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. PhDr. Jan Karlas, Ph.D., M.A. (27.10.2019)

The course consists of six seminars. Each seminar will be based on 1) a short lecture, 2) in-class work, and 3) discussion.

Požadavky ke zkoušce - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. PhDr. Jan Karlas, Ph.D., M.A. (27.10.2019)

1) Regular Attendance

Only 1 absence per semester is allowed (in case of a need to abstain more than one time due to health or other serious reasons the student must contact the course conveyor prior to his/her absence and prove the reasons for the absence, if necessary).

2) In-class work (20% of the credit in total)

One part of each seminar will be devoted to an in-class work, usually a short written reaction to a question or a few questions related to the readings.

3) Seminar Activity (20%)

Students are expected to be actively involved in the seminar discussions.

4) 1 Term paper (60% of the credit in total)

The term paper will describe and assess one or several liberal IR theories or apply those theories to a particular case or cases chosen by the student according to his/her interest. After an approval by the lecturer, a student may also base its term paper on an IR theory other than a liberal one. The paper should be 2500-3000 words in length (that is about 8-10 standardized pages). The paper must be submitted no later than January 21, 2020.

Sylabus - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. PhDr. Jan Karlas, Ph.D., M.A. (27.10.2019)

Course structure

The readings will be available in the course section in the SIS. They can be accessed just by the students who are signed up for the course.

1. Liberalism in International Relations – an introduction (October 1)

Zacher, Mark – Matthew, Richard (1995) Liberal International Theory: Common Threads, Divergent Strands, in Kegley, Charles (ed.), Controversies in International Relations Theory: Realism and the Neoliberal Challenge, New York: St. Martin’s Press, you can read only pages 107-122

Moravcsik, Andrew (1997) Taking Preferences Seriously: A Liberal Theory of International Politics, International Organization, 51(4), you can read only pages 513-533

Walt, Stephen (1998) International Relations: One World, Many Theories, Foreign Policy, 110, 29-44

[in total 50 pages]

2. Liberalism and peace (October 15)

Oneal, John R., Bruce M. Russett (1997) The Classical Liberals Were Right: Democracy, Interdependence, and Conflict, 1950-1985, International Studies Quarterly, 41, you can read only pp. 267-272

 

Haas, Mark L. (2007) The United States and the End of the Cold War: Reactions to Soviet Power, Policies, or Domestic Politics? International Organization, 61(1), you can read only pp. 145-170

Hayes, Jarod (2009) Identity and Securitization in the Democratic Peace: The United States and the Divergence of Responses to India and Iran’s Nuclear Programmes, International Studies Quarterly, 53, pp. 977-999

[in total 52 pages]

3. Liberalism and trade policy (November 12)

Lake, David A. (2009) Open Economy Politics: A Critical Review, Review of International Organizations, 4, you can read only introduction and pp. 224-228

Hiscox, Michael J. (1999) The Magic Bullet? The RTAA, Institutional Reform, and Trade Liberalization, International Organization, 53(4), you can read only pp. 669-691

Conceicao-Heldt, Eugénia da (2013) Emerging Powers in the WTO Negotiations: The Domestic Sources of Trade Policy Preferences, The International Trade Journal 27(5), pp. 431-449

[in total 47 pages]

4. Liberalism and international negotiations (November 26)

Putnam, Robert D. (1988) Diplomacy and Domestic Politics: The Logic of Two-Level Games, International Organization, 42(3), 427-460

Lisowski, Michael (2002) Playing the Two-level Game: US President Bush’s Decision to Repudiate the Kyoto Protocol, Environmental Politics, 11(4), pp. 101-119

[in total 51 pages]

5. Liberalism and international institutions (December 10)

Hasenclever, Andreas, Peter Mayer, and Volker Rittberger (1997) Theories of International Regimes, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, chap. 3 Interest-based theories, you can read only pp. 23-44

Zangl, Bernhard (2008) Judicialization Matters! A Comparison of Dispute Settlement under GATT and the WTO, International Studies Quarterly, 52(4), pp. 825-854

[in total 50 pages]

6. Liberalism and transnational relations (January 7)

Keck, Margaret E., Kathryn Sikkink (1999) Transnational Advocacy Networks in International and Regional Politics, International Social Science Journal, 51(159), 89-101

 

Price, Richard (1998) Reversing the Gun Sights: Transnational Civil Society Targets Land Mines, International Organization, 52(3), 613-644, you can read only pp. 613-627

 

Munoz, Alejandro Anya (2009) Transnational and Domestic Processes in the Definition of Human Rights Policies in Mexico, Human Rights Quarterly, 31, 35-58

[in total 49 pages]

 

 
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