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Předmět, akademický rok 2023/2024
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Global Justice: Interdisciplinary Perspectives - JPM041
Anglický název: Global Justice: Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Zajišťuje: Katedra politologie (23-KP)
Fakulta: Fakulta sociálních věd
Platnost: od 2023
Semestr: letní
E-Kredity: 5
Způsob provedení zkoušky: letní s.:
Rozsah, examinace: letní s.:1/1, Zk [HT]
Počet míst: neomezen / neomezen (30)
Minimální obsazenost: neomezen
4EU+: ne
Virtuální mobilita / počet míst pro virtuální mobilitu: ne
Stav předmětu: vyučován
Jazyk výuky: angličtina
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Poznámka: předmět je možno zapsat mimo plán
povolen pro zápis po webu
Garant: Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
Vyučující: Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
Třída: Courses for incoming students
Neslučitelnost : JPM399
Soubory Komentář Kdo přidal
stáhnout Reading for Class 02-03 - World Order with CHINESE CHARACTERISTICS - from Bloomsbury Handbook of Global Justice.pdf Reading for Class 02-03 - World Order with CHINESE CHARACTERISTICS Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Reading for Class 04 - RAWLS and His LAW OF PEOPLES - Samuel Freeman.pdf Reading for Class 04 - RAWLS and His LAW OF PEOPLES Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Reading for Class 05 - POGGE against Rawlsian Claim about Domestic Causation of Injustice.pdf Reading for Class 05 - POGGE against Rawlsian Claim about Domestic Causation of Injustice Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Reading for Class 06 - NUSSBAUM on Capabilities and Global Justice.pdf Reading for Class 06 - NUSSBAUM on Capabilities and Global Justice Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Reading for Class 07 - SEN & NUSSBAUM on Global Justice and Global Pluralism.pdf Reading for Class 07 - SEN & NUSSBAUM on Global Justice and Global Pluralism Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Reading for Class 08 - Global GENDER Justice - from Heather Widdows.pdf Reading for Class 08 - Global GENDER Justice Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Reading for Class 09 - MARKETS and Justice - Welfare Economics and Markets Failures - from Reiss.pdf Reading for Class 09 - MARKETS and Justice Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Reading for Class 10 - Nationalism & Global Democracy - by Kok-Chor Tan.pdf Reading for Class 10 - Nationalism & Global Democracy Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Reading for Class 11 - SANDEL - Republican Critique of Liberalism - Liberalism and the Limits of Justice.pdf Reading for Class 11 - SANDEL - Republican Critique of Liberalism Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Reading for Class 12 - MORALITY of SOLIDARITY as a Condition of Justice.pdf Reading for Class 12 - MORALITY of SOLIDARITY as a Condition of Justice Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
Anotace - angličtina
Since the course is intended primarily for students of social sciences, who are in need of intellectual tools to understand the complexity of our increasingly interconnected and yet also ideologically fragmented world, its main aim is to teach the skills of careful, thoughtful, rigorous, rational analysis of beliefs, problems and questions, which find no answers in natural sciences, because pertain to specifically human, “first person”, perspective of self-conscious subjects. Thus we will treat philosophical questions as “open questions”, which unsurprisingly have no definitive answers and yet have to be confronted by every individual who hopes to live a meaningful life and by every society hopes to create conditions for flourishing life of its members. Philosophy, since its inception in Ancient Greece, China and India, teaches critical engagement with beliefs, convictions, doctrines and dogmas taken for granted by most in an unreflective manner, thus often clearing the path for a social progress (Plato’s philosophical argument in favour of intellectual equality of men and women may serve as an example). On the other hand, philosophers (including the leading thinkers of the Western tradition), like all of us, tended to be blind to their own cultural prejudices and tended to ignore the contribution of other cultures. Living at the threshold of a Global Age, thoughtful human beings need to engage in a critical but constructive way with the wealth of the diverse intellectual and ethical traditions of humanity, therefore this course adopts a “global”, that is cross-cultural perspective in addressing the eternal human questions: “Who am I?”, “What can I know?”, “What should I do?”, “What can I hope for?”
Poslední úprava: Bednařík Petr, PhDr., Ph.D. (24.11.2021)
Literatura - angličtina

COURSE READINGS.

They will be extracted chiefly from the following anthologies:

Ethics: The Essential Writings (ed. Marino)

Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings (ed. Perry, Bratman, Fischer)

Philosophic Classics: From Plato to Derrida (ed. Baird)

Philosophy and Contemporary Issues (ed. Burr, Goldinger)

Philosophy: The Quest for Truth (ed. Pojman)

The Truth about the World: Basic Readings in Philosophy (ed. Rachels)

 

Poslední úprava: Bednařík Petr, PhDr., Ph.D. (24.11.2021)
Sylabus - angličtina

SYLLABUS

 

Philosophy for Social Sciences – JPM399

Institute of Political Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, Charles University in Prague

 

 

COURSE CONTENTS:

Class 1. Global Justice and the Evolving World Order (I)

Class 2. Global Justice and the Evolving World Order (II)

Class 3. Global Justice and the Evolving World Order (III)

Class 4. Justice as utility (Utilitarians)

Class 5. Justice as fairness (John Rawls)

Class 6. Justice as entitlement (Robert Nozick)

Class 7. The Theory of complex equality and the 'spheres of justice' (Michael Walzer)

Class 8. Communitarians on domestic and global justice (Alistair MacIntyre & Michael Sandel)

Class 9. Capabilities and Global Justice (Martha Nussbaum)

Class 10. John Rawls and his 'Law of Peoples'

Class 11. Globalizing Rawls or Global Distributive Justice (Thomas Pogge)

Class 12. Utilitarianism on Global Justice (Peter Singer)

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the theories of justice in society (social justice) and in international relations (global justice). While the necessary historical and philosophical background of the age-long struggle for social justice will be taken into account, the main focus of the course will be the contemporary debates about justice in domestic and international politics. Since “theories of justice” constitute the central part of the contemporary political theory, the ideas of some of the most influential political theorists of the 20th century will be discussed in the course of the semester, and the class readings will include fragments of some of the most important works of political philosophy of our times. Discussing various theories of justice, their relevance to the current political practice will always be considered (for example, by identifying how these theories of justice inform programs of various political parties and movements that are important part of the political scene in Europe and elsewhere.

 

CLASS READINGS:

All class readings will be uploaded in a PDF format on this webpage.

They will be extracted chiefly from the following anthologies:

Ethics: The Essential Writings (ed. Marino)

Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings (ed. Perry, Bratman, Fischer)

Philosophic Classics: From Plato to Derrida (ed. Baird)

Philosophy and Contemporary Issues (ed. Burr, Goldinger)

Philosophy: The Quest for Truth (ed. Pojman)

The Truth about the World: Basic Readings in Philosophy (ed. Rachels)

 

 

COURSE GRADING:

Final Essay:                             35%

Final Written Exam:                  65%  

Total:                                      100%

 

 

FINAL ESSAY INSTRUCTION:

TOPIC OF THE FINAL ESSAY: Each student will choose the topic of the final essay individually, by selecting one CLASS TOPIC explored in the relevant CLASS READINGS (uploaded on the current course webpage in the SIS), doing an additional approximately 100 pages of relevant scholarly reading on that topic (found on EBSO, JSTOR or other reliable sources of academic publications on problems social justice), and discussing intelligently, critically and creatively the issue under consideration. (Narrowing the focus of the discussion is always preferable to treating the research question in a shallow and vague manner.)

LENGTH: 1600 to 1800 words

DEADLINE: 48 before your final exam

 

FINAL EXAM INSTRUCTION:

FINAL EXAM is an in-class 3 hours long written exam (students choose one of the three exam dates by registering in the SIS).

FINAL EXAM will include "discussing" 3 topics selected by the student from a list of 6-7 topics provided by the lecturer. Only the topics explored in the class readings will be included. The aim of the exam is to test students' command of the main ideas about justice explored in the class readings, and their ability to think about the problems of justice in a philosophical manner (i.e., rationally and critically, considering arguments employed by the authors studied throughout the semester).

 

GRADING SCALE:

  • A = 91-100 % – excellent
  • B = 81-90 % – very good
  • C = 71-80 % – good
  • D = 61-70 % – satisfactory
  • E = 51-60 % – minimal pass
  • F = 0-50 % – fail

 

 

 

 

Poslední úprava: Salamon Janusz, Ph.D. (19.04.2024)
 
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