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Předmět, akademický rok 2019/2020
  
World War II and the New Europe: Czechoslovakia in the 20th Century European Politics - OEBZO15
Anglický název: World War II and the New Europe: Czechoslovakia in the 20th Century European Politics
Zajišťuje: Děkanát (41-DEKAN)
Fakulta: Pedagogická fakulta
Platnost: od 2011
Semestr: oba
E-Kredity: 4
Rozsah, examinace: 1/1 Zk [hodiny/týden]
Počet míst: zimní:neurčen / neurčen (neurčen)
letní:neurčen / neurčen (neurčen)
Minimální obsazenost: neomezen
Stav předmětu: nevyučován
Jazyk výuky: angličtina
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Poznámka: předmět je možno zapsat mimo plán
při zápisu přednost, je-li ve stud. plánu
předmět lze zapsat v ZS i LS
Garant: doc. RNDr. Miroslava Černochová, CSc.
Třída: Předměty v angličtině - bc.
Předměty v angličtině - mgr.
Anotace - angličtina
Poslední úprava: CERNOCHO/PEDF.CUNI.CZ (11.02.2011)
Czechoslovakia and the Czech Republic have often been at the epicentre of European politics, though mostly as mere objects of great-power relations. The creation of independent Czechoslovakia in the aftermath the First World War was a part of President Wilson’s ambitious project to reform international politics. For the rest of the interwar period, Czechoslovakia was one of the most active members of the Wilsonian League of Nations. In the late 1930s, the tense Czech-German relations resulted into a major crisis, which was one of the precursors of World War II. The 1939 German occupation of Czechoslovakia prompted Britain and France to guarantee Polish security, which eventually led them to declare war on Germany. Ten years later, the communist coup in Czechoslovakia accelerated the formation of NATO. The Soviet invasion of 1968 to crush the Prague Spring irreparably discredited Soviet communism worldwide. The 1989 "Velvet Revolution" is often invoked as the model for peaceful transition to democracy and the 1992 "Velvet Divorce" as the example of a peaceful solution of nationalist ambitions. The integration of the Czech Republic (and other Central European countries) into NATO and the European Union has been a major international issue of the past twenty years.
Cíl předmětu - angličtina
Poslední úprava: CERNOCHO/PEDF.CUNI.CZ (11.02.2011)

The aim of the course is to put the history of Czechoslovakia and the Czech Republic into the broader international context. We will focus on both the Czechoslovak foreign policy and the role the country played in the European history of the past hundred years. We will discuss the key events and problems linking Czech history with that of Europe and the United States. We will try to examine each problem from various angles and thus to challenge conventional interpretations.

Special attention will be devoted to the history of Czechoslovak-American relations. Not only did the United States act as a midwife in the process of Czechoslovakia’s creation, but subsequently the ups and downs of Czechoslovakia‘s fate kept intersecting with American foreign policy interests.

Požadavky ke zkoušce - angličtina
Poslední úprava: CERNOCHO/PEDF.CUNI.CZ (11.02.2011)

Course evaluation

Attendance 10%

Class preparation and participation 30%

Midterm test (March 29) 15%

Final test (May 3) 15%

Final paper (deadline May 3) 30%

The two tests (midterm and final) are short multiple-choice tests examining students’ knowledge of basic facts, events and concepts that have been discussed in classes and that could be read about in the readings.

Students must choose a topic of their final paper by March 8 and inform the lecturer on their choice (preferably by e-mail). Students are free to choose any topic that is relevant, but they are recommended to choose from the weekly topics outlined in this syllabus. The papers (8 to 10 pages or 14,400 to 18,000 characters including spaces) are to be delivered to the lecturer by May 3. Final papers will be presented during the final session (May 3).

Attendance policy

Attendance is obligatory, and so is consistent class preparation and active participation. A single absence will not adversely affect the grade but more than that will automatically lower it. Medical absences are excused with the prompt receipt of proper documentation.

Class protocol

Students are required to be involved in class activities. They are expected to show their preparation by participating in discussions, by asking relevant questions, being critical and analytical with the contents presented in class as well as by sharing their ideas and opinions. It is expected that students arrive to class on time and that they return promptly to class after any given class break.

Sylabus - angličtina
Poslední úprava: CERNOCHO/PEDF.CUNI.CZ (11.02.2011)

Part 1

Introduction: Czechoslovakia in European History (basic concepts, facts, figures and events; overview of Czechoslovak-American relations; Czechoslovakia’s role in international affairs; has Central European history been uniquely complicated? - clichés and stereotypes; continuity and discontinuity in Czechoslovak history; competing interpretations of history).

Required reading:

JONATHAN SUNLEY: Post-Communism. In: The National Interest, Summer 1996 (Issue 44), pp. 1-8.

LEXINGTON: Old America v New Europe, In: The Economist, February 20, 2003.

JAN JIREŠ: United States and Central Europe: A Special Relationship? Guest lecture delivered at the Middle Tennessee State University, March 3, 2009.

Part 2

The Wilsonian project and the creation of Czechoslovakia (Austria-Hungary in the World War I, Czech nationalists and their activities abroad to achieve independence; the role of Czech-Americans and Slovak-Americans; Woodrow Wilson’s project to reform international affairs, the Fourteen Points; paradoxes and contradictions of Czechoslovakia’s creation).

Required reading:

HENRY KISSINGER: Diplomacy. New York, Simon & Schuster 1994, pp. 218-245.

Declaration of Independence of the Czechoslovak Nation by its Provisional Government, October 18, 1918.

Part 3

The interwar years: small-power diplomacy in a dangerous world (Czechoslovakia as a status-quo power in European politics; Czechoslovakia in the League of Nations; Czechoslovakia’s friends and foes, the dynamic of alliances; economic expansion & the Great Depression).

Required reading:

MARY HEIMANN: Czechoslovakia: The State That Failed. New Haven, Yale University Press 2009, pp. 48-74.

OLDŘICH TŮMA, JAROSLAV PÁNEK: A History of the Czech Lands. Prague, Karolinum 2009, pp. 395-420.

Part 4

Munich Agreement: the road to World War II (the sources of the Sudeten crisis; great-power interests and Czechoslovakia in the 1930s, Czechoslovakia’s allies in the 1930s, great-power relations and the Munich agreement; the consequences of Munich, United States and the Sudeten crisis; the "second life" of Munich and the "Munich complex" in U.S. foreign policy).

Required reading:

HENRY KISSINGER: Diplomacy. New York, Simon & Schuster 1994, pp. 306-317.

MARY HEIMANN: Czechoslovakia: The State That Failed. New Haven, Yale University Press 2009, pp. 74-86.

OLDŘICH TŮMA, JAROSLAV PÁNEK: A History of the Czech Lands. Prague, Karolinum 2009, pp. 420-431.

Part 5

Czechoslovakia in World War II (the Nazi occupation of the Bohemian Crown Lands and its international consequences; the establishment of the German Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia; Czechoslovak government-in-exile and its activities to re-establish Czechoslovakia; Czechoslovak military abroad; the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich and its consequences; sliding into the Soviet orbit: the 1943 Czechoslovak-Soviet treaty; the liberation of Czechoslovakia by the Soviet and American militaries).

Required reading:

MARY HEIMANN: Czechoslovakia: The State That Failed. New Haven, Yale University Press 2009, pp. 111-149.

OLDŘICH TŮMA, JAROSLAV PÁNEK: A History of the Czech Lands. Prague, Karolinum 2009, pp. 435-458.

Part 6

The Third Republic and the road to Communist takeover (Europe and Czechoslovakia in 1945; the new superpowers and their European interests; ethnic homogenization: the expulsion of German speakers from Czechoslovakia; the communist subversion; Czechoslovakia and the Marshall Plan; the communist takeover in 1948 and its international consequences; why Czechoslovakia, why not Finland? - a comparative view).

Required reading:

HENRY KISSINGER: Diplomacy. New York, Simon & Schuster 1994, pp. 446-463.

JÜRGEN TAMPKE: Czech-German Relations and the Politics of Central Europe: From Bohemia to the EU. Palgrave-Macmillan 2002, pp. 73-94.

LONNIE JOHNSON: Central Europe: Enemies, Neighbours, Friends. New York and Oxford, OUP 2002, pp. 229-238.

Part 7

Czechoslovakia in the Cold War (emigration; terror and resistance at home; U.S. position; Czechoslovakia’s role within the Soviet Bloc).

Required reading:

MARY HEIMANN: Czechoslovakia: The State That Failed. New Haven, Yale University Press 2009, pp. 177-204.

OLDŘICH TŮMA, JAROSLAV PÁNEK: A History of Czech Lands. Prague, Karolinum 2009, pp. 493-519.

Part 8

The 1960s liberalisation, the 1968 Warsaw Pact invasion and the Czechoslovak "normalisation" (the 1960s liberalisation in Czechoslovakia and its domestic and international sources; the Prague Spring and its international context ; the Warsaw Pact invasion of August 1968 and its international consequences; impact on the Soviet reputation; Soviet motives behind the intervention; the "Normalization" regime in Czechoslovakia; the 1975 Helsinki Accords and the anti-Communist opposition in Czechoslovakia).

Required reading:

OLDŘICH TŮMA, JAROSLAV PÁNEK: A History of Czech Lands. Prague, Karolinum 2009, pp. 539-565.

Part 9

The idea of Central Europe and its revival in the 1980s (Western Europe x Eastern Europe; the revival of the idea of Central Europe as an instrument to undermine the bipolar division of Europe; the critics of the idea of Central Europe; the influence of the idea of Central Europe on the post-1989 Czechoslovak foreign policy).

Required reading:

MILAN KUNDERA: The Tragedy of Central Europe. In: The New York Review of Books, April 26, 1984 (Volume 31, Number 7), pp. 1-14.

TONY JUDT: The Rediscovery of Central Europe. In: Daedalus, Winter 1990 (Volume 119, Number 1), pp. 23-51.

TIMOTHY GARTON ASH: The Puzzle of Central Europe. In: The New York Review of Books, March 18, 1999 (Volume 46, Number 5), 1-12.

Part 10

The Spring of Nations 2.0: Czechoslovak "Velvet Revolution" in the context of the decline and fall of the Soviet Bloc (Czechoslovakia in the 1980s - comparison with other Soviet Bloc countries; opposition activity and their support from abroad; Gorbachev’s failed attempt to reform the Soviet Union; the 1989 Velvet Revolution in comparison with regime changes in other Soviet Bloc countries).

Required reading:

TIMOTHY GARTON ASH: The Magic Lantern: The Revolution of ’89 Witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin and Prague. Vintage Books 1993, pp. 78-122.

OLDŘICH TŮMA, JAROSLAV PÁNEK: A History of Czech Lands. Prague, Karolinum 2009, pp. 569-584.

Part 11

1990-1992: Czechoslovak foreign policy in the new Europe ("Return to Europe": integration with the West and assuming Western identity as the supreme goal of the new Czechoslovak foreign policy; United States and the post-communist Central Europe; Central European regional cooperation; the dissolution of the Warsaw Pact; the dissolution of Czechoslovakia and its international dimension).

Required reading:

MARY HEIMANN: Czechoslovakia: The State That Failed. New Haven, Yale University Press 2009, pp. 307-324.

RONALD ASMUS: Opening NATO’s Door: How the Alliance Remade itself for a New Era. New York, Columbia University Press 2002, pp. 3-17.

PAUL G. LEWIS: Central Europe since 1945. London, Longman 1994, pp. 296-299.

Part 12

Concluding discussion: Czechoslovakia as a failed state? (Was the Wilsonian Project a mistake? What role did Czechoslovakia play in the 20th-century European politics? What should have been done differently? Final papers in-class presentation).

Požadavky k zápisu - angličtina
Poslední úprava: CERNOCHO/PEDF.CUNI.CZ (11.02.2011)

The subject is taught by the experts from UJOP. You can find more details including the timetable of the course on http://it.pedf.cuni.cz/socrates/index.php?link=32&lang=en.

If you want to be enrolled in the course please contact immediatelly by e-mail Mrs Stanislava Vlckova (stanislava.vlckova@pedf.cuni.cz).

 
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