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Ethno-Political Conflicts in the Caucasus - JTM269
Anglický název: Ethno-Political Conflicts in the Caucasus
Zajišťuje: Katedra ruských a východoevropských studií (23-KRVS)
Fakulta: Fakulta sociálních věd
Platnost: od 2022
Semestr: zimní
E-Kredity: 6
Způsob provedení zkoušky: zimní s.:kombinovaná
Rozsah, examinace: zimní s.:1/1, Zk [HT]
Počet míst: 28 / neurčen (15)
Minimální obsazenost: neomezen
Virtuální mobilita / počet míst: ne
Stav předmětu: vyučován
Jazyk výuky: angličtina
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Poznámka: předmět je možno zapsat mimo plán
povolen pro zápis po webu
při zápisu přednost, je-li ve stud. plánu
Garant: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D.
Vyučující: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D.
Třída: Courses for incoming students
Neslučitelnost : JMM130
Anotace - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (13.09.2022)
Ethno-political conflicts are not a phenomenon peculiar to the region of the Caucasus. But they became part of the region’s post-Soviet history following the collapse of the Soviet Union. In this context, this one-semester course sheds light on key aspects of ethno-political conflicts in the region by combining an understanding of major concepts and theories of ethno-political conflict initiation and separatism with an analysis of the case studies of Nagorno-Karabakh, South Ossetia and Abkhazia. The course will also draw attention to latent hotspots of ethno-political tensions across the region.
Cíl předmětu - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (13.09.2022)

The goal of this course is to supply students with the relevant conceptual vocabulary and historical contexts to understand and to analyse the emergence and occassional sparks of ethno-political conflict in the post-Soviet region of South Caucasus.

Podmínky zakončení předmětu - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (13.09.2022)

REQUIREMENTS

1)    Attendance is mandatory as the course is designed as a seminar where substantial student participation is needed in class and in-person. Depending on COVID-19 situation, the course might take place on-line via the zoom platform.

2)    For every three weeks, a position paper of around 300 words should be prepared, to be submitted in Moodle. Position papers should address reading for particular class. They should be done individually not as a group effort.

3)    Two weeks after the end of the course, a final paper of around 2500 words should be submitted to the lecturer.

4)    Active class participation – 10%, mid-term test – 30%, position papers – 30% and final paper-30%.  

 

 EVALUATION 

A - "výborně - A" - "excellent - A"
B - "výborně - B" - "excellent - B"
C - "velmi dobře - C" - "very good - C"
D - "velmi dobře - D" - "very good - D"
E - "dobře - E" - "good - E"
F - "neprospěl/a - F" - "fail – F” 

See Dean´s provision https://www.fsv.cuni.cz/opatreni-dekanky-c-172018aj

 

Literatura - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (13.09.2022)

 

A.    READING ASSIGNMENT  

 

1.     Introduction to the course

·       Syllabus

·       Cornell, Small Nations and Great Empires: A study of ethno-political conflict in the Caucasus <https://is.muni.cz/el/1423/podzim2012/MVZ208/um/35586974/Small_Nations_and_Great_Powers__A_Study_of_Ethnopolitical_Conflict_in_the_Caucasus__.pdf> (Chapters 1 and 2)

Further reading(s)

·       Frederik Coene’s The Caucasus (Introduction chapter, see SIS). 

 

2.     Understanding main concepts: identity, ethnicity, nationalism

·       Howard, ‘Social Psychology of Identities’ in

Further reading(s)

·       Eriksen, ‘Ethnicity vs Nationalism’ in < http://www.hyllanderiksen.net/Ethnnat.pdf>

 

3.     Defining ethno-political conflict

·       Gilley, ‘Against the Concept of Ethnic Conflict’,

Further reading(s)

·       Varshney, ‘Ethnicity and Ethnic Conflict’, < http://ashutoshvarshney.net/wp-content/files_mf/varshneyethnicityandethnicconflict.pdf>

 

4.     Theorizing the causes of ethno-political conflicts and separatism

·       Suleimanov, ‘Understanding ethno-political conflict’ in

Further reading(s)

·       Siroky, ‘Explaining Secession’ in 

·       Brown, G., ‘Development and conflict: theoretical and empirical linkages’, Securing Peace: State-building and Economic Development in post Conflict Countries, (2011), 53-70.

 

  

5.     Escalation in ethno-political conflict 

·       Carment & James, ‘Escalation in Ethnic Conflict: A Survey & Assessment’ in

Further reading(s)

·       Oliveira, ‘A discussion of Rational and Psychological Decision-making Theories and Models’, in  

·       MIT Security Studies Program, in < http://ssp.mit.edu>

 

6.     Reconciliation in ethno-political conflict

·       Bloomfield et al (eds.), ‘Reconciliation after violent conflict’, in (Part Two)

Further reading(s)

·       Kaufman, S., ‘Escaping the Symbolic Politics Trap: Reconciliation Initiatives & Conflict Resolution in Ethnic Wars’, Journal of Peace Research, 43/2 (2006), 201-218.

 

7.     Mid-term test

 

8.     Case study I - the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict: the causes & escalation   

·       Cornell, Small Nations and Great Empires: A study of ethno-political conflict in the Caucasus <https://is.muni.cz/el/1423/podzim2012/MVZ208/um/35586974/Small_Nations_and_Great_Powers__A_Study_of_Ethnopolitical_Conflict_in_the_Caucasus__.pdf> (Chapter 3)

Further reading(s)

·       Gasparian, Arsen, ‘Understanding the Nagorno-Karabakh Conflict: Domestic politics and twenty-five years of fruitless negotiations 1994-2018’, Caucasus Survey, DOI: 10.1080/23761199.2019.1674114 (2019).

  

9.     Case study I - the South Ossetia conflict: the causes & escalation   

·       Cornell, Small Nations and Great Empires: A study of ethno-political conflict in the Caucasus <https://is.muni.cz/el/1423/podzim2012/MVZ208/um/35586974/Small_Nations_and_Great_Powers__A_Study_of_Ethnopolitical_Conflict_in_the_Caucasus__.pdf> (Chapter 4)

Further reading(s)

·       Vincent M. Artman, ‘Documenting Territory: Passportisation, Territory, and Exception in Abkhazia and South Ossetia, Geopolitics’, 18:3, (2013), 682-704, DOI:10.1080/14650045.2013.769963

 

10.  Case study I - the Abkhazia conflict: the causes & escalation   

·       Cornell, Small Nations and Great Empires: A study of ethno-political conflict in the Caucasus <https://is.muni.cz/el/1423/podzim2012/MVZ208/um/35586974/Small_Nations_and_Great_Powers__A_Study_of_Ethnopolitical_Conflict_in_the_Caucasus__.pdf> (Chapter 4)

Further reading(s)

·       Gerrits, A., Bader, M., ‘Russian Patronage over Abkhazia and South Ossetia: Implication for Conflict Resolution’, East European Politics, 32/3 (2016), 297-313.

 

11.  Cases of latent ethnic conflict in the region 

·       Azerbaijani & Armenian minorities in Georgia, in < https://www.crisisgroup.org/europe-central-asia/caucasus/georgia/georgia-s-armenian-and-azeri-minorities >

·       Avar, Lezghin and Talysh minorities in Azerbaijan, in (Part on Azerbaijan)

·       Yazidis, Russian & other minorities in Armenia, in (Part on Armenia)

·       Ingush Ossetian Conflict, in

·       Matevosyan, V., Currie, B., ‘A conflict that did not happen: visiting the Javakhk affair in Georgia’, Nation and Nationalism(2018), 1-21.

 

12.  Concluding seminar

·       Laurence Broers, ‘Stuck in the post-liberal limbo? Conflict resolution in the South Caucasus’, Journal of Conflict Transformation, 5 October 2019, pp. 1-16.

Further reading(s)

·       Murshed, S. M., ‘Peace-building and social contract’, Securing Peace: State-building and Economic Development in post Conflict Countries, (2011), 71-86.

Metody výuky - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (13.09.2022)

The course is seminar-based and will take place offline, which means that the lecturer will open up the discussion on the reading material of the week by laying out the main concepts and questions which will be followed by students' interventions and analytical discussions. The reading material will be accessable in Moodle. 

 

 

Sylabus - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (13.09.2022)

Ethno-political Conflicts in the Caucasus (JMM 130) 

Associate Professor Adrian Brisku, PhD

Department of Russian & East European Studies, Charles University 

https://cuni.academia.edu/adrianBrisku

adrian.brisku@fsv.cuni.cz

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

Ethno-political conflicts are not a phenomenon peculiar to the region of the Caucasus. But they became part of the region’s post-Soviet history following the collapse of the Soviet Union. In this context, this one-semester course sheds light on key aspects of ethno-political conflict in the region by combining an understanding of major concepts and theories of ethno-political conflict initiation and separatism with an analysis of the case studies of Nagorno-Karabakh, South Ossetia and Abkhazia. The course will also draw attention to latent hotspots of ethno-political tensions across the region.  

 

A.    COURSE DESIGN  

1.     Introduction to the course

2.     Understanding the main concepts: identity, ethnicity, nationalism

3.     Defining ethno-political conflict 

4.     Theorizing the causes of ethno-political conflict and separatism

5.     Escalation of ethno-political conflict 

6.     Reconciliation in ethnic conflict 

7.     Midterm test 

8.     Case study I – the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict: causes & escalation  

9.     Case study II – the South-Ossetia conflict: the causes & escalation

10.  Case study III – the Abkhazia conflict: the causes & escalation 

11.  Cases of latent ethnic conflict in the region

12.  Concluding seminar

 

Updated,

13.09.2022

 
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