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Předmět, akademický rok 2022/2023
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Comparative and Conceptual History - JTM048
Anglický název: Comparative and Conceptual History
Zajišťuje: Katedra ruských a východoevropských studií (23-KRVS)
Fakulta: Fakulta sociálních věd
Platnost: od 2022
Semestr: zimní
E-Kredity: 6
Způsob provedení zkoušky: zimní s.:
Rozsah, examinace: zimní s.:0/2, Zk [HT]
Počet míst: neurčen / neurčen (15)
Minimální obsazenost: neomezen
Virtuální mobilita / počet míst: ne
Stav předmětu: vyučován
Jazyk výuky: angličtina
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Poznámka: předmět je možno zapsat mimo plán
povolen pro zápis po webu
Garant: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D.
Vyučující: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D.
Třída: Courses for incoming students
Je prerekvizitou pro: JTM049
Anotace - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (13.09.2022)
Since their emergence, respectively, in 1960s and 1970s, comparative history and conceptual history have become important research perspectives in social sciences and historical studies scholarship. These perspectives are different in many ways, for instance conceptual history is more sensitive to concepts’ semantic context. They are similar in that while comparisons are largely informed by theoretical models, such models are nonetheless conceptual systems, which have gone through a process of clarification, definition and detachment from their original context. This course provides a solid and contextualized overview of the nature, methodologies and usages of comparative (qualitative) and conceptual history in these two fields. It will do so by detailing and discussing their strengths and shortcomings and in the process help students design comparative and conceptual research projects.
Cíl předmětu - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (13.09.2022)
This course aims at providing students with a solid and contextualized overview of the nature, methodologies and usages of comparative (qualitative) and conceptual history in historical studies and social sciences. It will do so by detailing and discussing their strengths and shortcomings and in the process help students design comparative and conceptual research projects. 
Podmínky zakončení předmětu - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (13.09.2022)

REQUIREMENTS

1)    Attendance is mandatory as the course is designed as a seminar where substantial student participation is needed. Given the circumstances with COVID-19, the course might take place on-line via the zoom platform.

2)    For every three weeks, a position paper of around 300 words should be prepared, to be submitted in Moodle. Position papers should address reading for particular class. They should be done individually not as a group effort.

3)    Two weeks after the end of the course, a final paper of around 2500 words should be submitted to the lecturer.

4)    Active class participation – 20%, position papers– 30% and final paper-50%.  

EVALUATION 

A - "výborně - A" - "excellent - A"
B - "výborně - B" - "excellent - B"
C - "velmi dobře - C" - "very good - C"
D - "velmi dobře - D" - "very good - D"
E - "dobře - E" - "good - E"
F - "neprospěl/a - F" - "fail - F"

For more detail on evaluation system see the Dean´s provision https://www.fsv.cuni.cz/opatreni-dekanky-c-172018aj

Literatura - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (13.09.2022)

B.   READING ASSIGNMENT

1. Introductory Seminar

·       Balazs Trencsenyi et al (eds), The Rise of Comparative History, vol 1 (Budapest: CEU, 2021, ‘Introduction’, pp, 4-25.

 

2Comparison as Uncovering Universal Laws & Causality: The Annales School Input

·       Marc Bloch, ‘A Contribution towards a Comparative History of European Societies,’ in Balazs Trencsenyi et al (eds), The Rise of Comparative History, vol 1 (Budapest: CEU, 2021, ‘Introduction’, pp, 89-123.

·       William H. Sewell, “Marc Bloch and the Logic of Comparative History”, History and Theory, 1967, Vol 6, No. 2, pp. 208-218.

 

3. Comparison as Change, Causality & Variation: The Modernisation Thesis & Social Sciences Input

·       Charles C. Ragin, The Comparative Method, UCP, 1987, pp. 1-68.

·       Theda Skopcol and Margaret Somers, ‘The Uses of Comparative History in Macrosocial Inquiry’, Comparative Studies in Society and History, Vol. 22, No. 2, 1980, pp. 174-197. 

 

4. Asymmetric Comparison: The Social History Input

·       Jürgen Kocka, “Asymmetric Historical Comparison: The Case of the German Sonderweg”, History and Theory, 1999, Vol 38, No. 1, pp. 40-50. 

·       Jürgen Kocka, “Comparative Historical Research: German Examples”, International Review of Social History 38 (1993), pp. 369–379.

 

5. Comparative Conceptual History: The Linguistic Turn Input 

·       Peter Wagner, “As Intellectual History Meets Historical Sociology…”, in Handbook of Historical Sociology, Sage, 2003, pp. 168-179.

·       Reinhart Koselleck, “Three Bürgerlische Worlds”, in Futures Past: On the Semantics of Historical Time, New York, 2004, pp. 209-17.

 

6. Comparative, Entangled & Transnational History: The Cultural History Input

·       Jürgen Kocka, Heinz-Gerhart Haupt, “Comparison and Beyond: Traditions, Scope and Perspectives of Comparative History”, in Comparative and Transnational History, edited by Jurgen Kocka, Heinz-Gerhart Haupt, Berghahn Books, 2009, pp. 1-32. 

·       Thomas Welskopp, “Crossing the Boundaries? Dynamics of Contention Viewed from the Angle of a Comparative Historian,” International Review of Social History 49 (2004), pp. 122–131.

 

7. Wold-System Analysis: The “Political Economy” Input

·       Immanuel Wallerstein, World System Analysis: An Introduction, Duke University Press, 2007, pp. 1-90

 

8. Comparing the Emergence and Development of Democracy

·       Barrington Moore, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy. Boston: Beacon Press, 1966, chapters I & II, pp. 3-108.

·       Adam Przeworski, Democracy and Development: Political Institutions and Material Well-Being in the World: 1950-1990, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002, chapters I & II, p. 13-128.

 

9. Comparing Welfare States

·       Paul Pierson, “Three Worlds of Welfare State Research”, Comparative Political Studies, 2000, 33: pp. 822-44.

·       Jonas Pontusson, Inequality and Prosperity: Social Europe vs. Liberal America, Cornel University Press, 2005, pp. 1-30.

 

10. Comparing Post-Soviet Societies

·       Kuzio, T., "History, Memory and the Nation-Building in the Post-Soviet Colonial Space," Nationalities Papers, Vol. 30, No. 2, 2002, p. 241-264.

·       Erica Marat, “State-Propagated Narratives about a National Defender in Central Asian States", The Journal of Power Institutions in Post-Soviet Societies, 6/7, 2007 [Online]. 

 

11. Comparative Conceptual History: Europe, Reform

·       Adrian Brisku, Political Reform in the Ottoman and the Russian Empires: A Comparative Approach, 2017, ‘Introduction’, pp. 1-14

·       Adrian Brisku, Bittersweet Europe, 2013, pp. 1-27.

·       Jiří Vykoukal, “Fusion or Fusion: Concepts of Central Europe and Regional Integration”, Osteeuropa 2007, pp. 183-204.

 

12. Comparative Conceptual History of Small Nations

·       M. Hroch, Social Preconditions of National Revival in Europe. Colombia University Press; part 1, ‘Introduction’, 2000, pp, 1-30

·       Brisku, A. 2022. ‘Dealing with Smallness in Habsburg Bohemia, Ottoman Albania, Tsarist Georgia in the late 19thto the early 20th Centuries’, in Politics of Smallness, S. Kruizinga (ed), London, Bloomsbury Academic, pp, 35-54.

   

 

Updated 13.09.2022

Metody výuky - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (13.09.2022)

The course is seminar-based and takes place in person, which means that the lecturer will open up the discussion on the reading material of the week by laying out the main concepts and questions which will be followed by students' interventions and analytical discussions. 

 

 

 

Sylabus - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Adrian Brisku, Ph.D. (13.09.2022)

 

Comparative & Conceptual History

Associate Professor Adrian Brisku, PhD.

Department of Russian & East European Studies, Charles University 

https://cuni.academia.edu/adrianBrisku

adrian.brisku@fsv.cuni.cz

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

 

Since their emergence, respectively, in 1960s and 1970s, comparative history and conceptual history have become important research perspectives in social sciences and historical studies scholarship. These perspectives are different in many ways, for instance conceptual history is more sensitive to concepts’ semantic context. They are similar in that while comparisons are largely informed by theoretical models, such models are nonetheless conceptual systems, but that have gone through a process of clarification, definition and detachment from their original context. This course provides a solid and contextualized overview of the nature, methodologies and usages of comparative (qualitative) and conceptual history in these two fields. It will do so by detailing and discussing their strengths and shortcomings and in the process help students design comparative and conceptual research projects. 

 

 

A.   COURSE DESIGN

1.     Introduction of the Course 

2.     Comparison as Uncovering Universal Laws, Historical Information & as Explanation: The Annales School Input 

3.     Comparison as Causality, Change & Variation: The Modernisation Thesis & Social Sciences Input 

4.     Asymmetric Comparison: The Social History Input

5.     Comparative Conceptual History: The “Linguistic Turn” Input

6.     Comparative, Entangled & Transnational History: The Cultural History Input 

7.     World System Analysis: The Political Economy Input

8.     Comparing Democracies 

9.     Comparing the Welfare State

10.  Comparing Post-Soviet Societies  

11.  Comparative Conceptual History: Europe, Reform

12.  Comparative Conceptual History of Small Nations

 
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