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Předmět, akademický rok 2009/2010
  
European policies and practice towards ethnic minorities - JSM628
Anglický název: European policies and practice towards ethnic minorities
Zajišťuje: Katedra veřejné a sociální politiky (23-KVSP)
Fakulta: Fakulta sociálních věd
Platnost: od 2008 do 2009
Semestr: zimní
Body: 9
E-Kredity: 9
Způsob provedení zkoušky: zimní s.:
Rozsah, examinace: zimní s.:1/1 Zk [hodiny/týden]
Počet míst: neurčen / neurčen (50)Rozvrh není zveřejněn, proto je tento údaj pouze informativní a může se ještě měnit.
Minimální obsazenost: neomezen
Stav předmětu: vyučován
Jazyk výuky: angličtina
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Další informace: http://dl.cuni.cz/course/view.php?id=464
Poznámka: předmět je možno zapsat mimo plán
povolen pro zápis po webu
Garant: Mgr. Antonin Bernard Thompson Mikes, BA, Ph.D.
P//Je prerekvizitou pro: JSM629
Anotace -
Poslední úprava: MIKESA (16.09.2013)
This course discusses and analyses major ethnic, racial, national, and religious minorities in contemporary Europe from a sociological, political, legal, historical and anthropological perspectives. It will look at broad range of topic such as inclusive citizenship, identity, conflict, migration, minority rights, international law, minority policy development and implementation. By using case studies, student will deepen their understanding of the status and condition of minorities in Europe, the roots of and solutions to ethnic conflict, and gradually changing European conceptions of citizenship and the multicultural state.
Sylabus -
Poslední úprava: MIKESA (16.09.2013)

* JSM628 European Policy and Practice towards Ethnic Minorities
* dl.moodle.cz


This course discusses and analyses major ethnic, racial, national, and religious minorities in contemporary Europe from a sociological, political, legal, historical and anthropological perspectives. It will look at broad range of topics such as inclusive citizenship, identity, conflict, migration, minority rights, international law, minority policy development and its implementation. By using case studies, students will deepen their understanding of the status and condition of minorities in Europe, the roots of and solutions to ethnic conflict, and gradually changing European conceptions of citizenship and multicultural states.

* COURSE TIMETABLE

* Aims of the Course and Teaching Objectives
The principles of equality, non-discrimination, observance of human rights and protection of ethnic minorities are fundamental European values. Ethnic discrimination in its various forms and manifestations has been made illegal through the recent EU anti-discrimination directives, recognising that it is harmful to the social and educational development of individuals and to Europe as a whole. It can lead to marginalised and socially excluded groups, unemployment and poverty in ghettoised districts and negatively influence already disadvantaged regions. One of the traditionally most severely marginalized and excluded groups have been the Roma, Gypsies, and Travellers.
The course aims to explain reasons behind prejudice, stereotypes, and discrimination against these ethnic groups and to introduce students to public and social policy measures dealing with these negative phenomena at the global, European and national levels.
Through active participation and the formulation of policy suggestions (or analysis) students will gain greater understanding of the complexities surrounding the issue of minority rights and policies specific to inequality, race and gender.

* Course Outline and Reading Guide
The reader contains all required readings listed below. A sufficient number of copies of the reader will be placed in the University Library study room in Jinonice. Additional materials may be obtained from the lecturers or are to be found in the library or from online searches. Students are expected to read the materials for the week ahead of class.

* I. Theoretical Framework
* Week 1 No required readings

* Week 2 Introduction - cont.; Concept of Multiculturalism
* Readings: Ethnicity, race, culture, identity, racism
- Eriksen, T. H.: "Ethnicity, Race, Class and Nation ", text 4, in Hutchinson, John, Smith Anthony, eds. (1996) Ethnicity, Oxford- New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 28-31
- Van den Berghe, Pierre: "Does race matter?", text 9, in Hutchinson (above), pp. 57-63
- Cornell, Stephen, Hartmann, Douglas (1998) Ethnicity and Race. Making Identities in a Changing World, Pine Forge Press/A Sage Publication Company, text on The definition of race, pp 21- 43, 68-69
- Richmond, Anthony (1994) Global Apartheid, Toronto: Oxford University Press (pp.1-45) on power, conflict, identity (good description of race and ethnicity)
- Optional:
- Kovats, Martin (2001) "The Emergence of European Roma Policy", in Guy ed.,Between Past and Future: the Roma of Central and Eastern Europe, Hartfield: Uni of Hertfordshire Press. 93-116.

* Week 3 Racisms & Discrimination
* Readings: Integration, multiculturalism, nationalism
- Birch, Anthony (1989) Nationalism and National Integration, London: Unwin Hyman Ltd, chapter 4: National integration, pp. 36-51 - classical text on integration!
- Brubacker, Rogers, "Civic and ethnic nations in France and Germany", text 28. in Hutchinson, John, Smith Anthony, ed. (1996) Ethnicity, Oxford - New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 168-173
- Kymlicka, Will (2001)"Western Political Theory and Ethnic Relations in Eastern Europe", in Kymlicka, Will, Opalski, Magda (eds.) Can Liberal Pluralism be Exported?, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp.13 - 103
- UNDP (2003) The Roma in Central and Eastern Europe. Avoiding the Dependency Trap, UNDP.
- Hancock, Ian (2000) "The Consequences of Anti-Gypsy Racism in Europe" in Other Voices. The (e)Journal of Cultural Criticism, v. 2, n.1 (February 2000), http://www.othervoices.org/2.1/hancock/roma.html
- Optional:
- Benhabib, Seyla (2002) The Claims of Culture. Equality and Diversity in the Global Era. Princeton, USA- Woodstock, UK: Princeton University Press, preface plus pp. 1-48
* II. Policy Implications
* Week 4
* Readings: Multiculturalism, identity and politics
- Malik, Kenan (1996) The Meaning of Race, London: Macmillan, "The meaning of Multiculturalism", pp.169-177, and "The West and its Others´", pp.221-226
- Rex, John (2001) "The concept of a multicultural society" in Guibernau, Montserrat and Rex, John (eds): The Ethnicity Reader. Nationalism, Multiculturalism and Migration, Cambridge, UK: Polity Press, pp. 205-220
- Kuper, Leo (2001) "Plural Societies" in Guibernau (above)
- Thornberry, Patrick (2001)" An Unfinished Story of Minority Rights" in Bíró, A.M. and Kovács, P (eds) Diversity in Action, Budapest. LGI/OSI, pp.47-73

* Week 5
* Readings: Definitions and forms of discrimination
- EU race equality directive:Implementing the Principle of Equal Treatment Between Persons Irrespective of Racial or Ethnic Origin Directive 2000/43/EC (adopted on 29 June 2000)
- Parekh, Bhikhu (2000) Rethinking Multiculturalism: Chapter 7: The Political Structure of Multicultural Society Equal opportunity policy and positive action

* Week 6 Definitions and Forms of Discrimination
* Readings: Multiculturalism, identity and politics- cont.
- Benhabib, Seyla (2002) The Claims of Culture. Equality and Diversity in the Global Era. Princeton, USA- Woodstock, UK: Princeton University Press, preface plus pp. 1-48
- Bagihole, Barbara (1997) Equal Opportunities and Social Policy: Issues of gender, race and disability, London: Longman, Chapter two: What is Equal Opportunities? pp. 31-47

* Week 7 Legislative framework: international instruments
* Readings:
- Framework convention for the protection of national minorities in in Bíró, A.M. and Kovács, P (eds) Diversity in Action, Budapest. LGI/OSI, pp.75-81
- The ERRC letter to Dr. Petra Buzková of 26 March 2003

* III. Minority Case study
* Week 8
- Student submitted readings,
* Readings:
- Optional:
- UNDP (2003) The Roma in Central and Eastern Europe, UNDP. http://roma.undp.sk(website down)
- World Bank (2007) The Roma Page, www.worldbank.org/roma
- Okely, Judith (1997) "Some political consequences of theories of Gypsy ethnicity. The place of the intellectual" in James, Alisson et al. (eds) After Writing Culture. Epistemology and Praxis in Contemporary Anthropology, London: Routledge

- Week 9 Case Study: The Roma/ Gypsies/ Travellers
- Student submitted readings,
* Readings:
- World Bank (2007) The Roma Page, www.worldbank.org/roma
- Decade of Roma Inclusion, www.romadecade.org

* III. Country Case study
* Week 10 -12 No required readings

* Students´ Assignments and Exam Requirements
Students will be expected to write a total of three (3) ACQIs, two based on the reading package and one on a reading chosen by the student found during their research (must be approved through Moodle and posted for others to read). Additionally, students are required to deliver one essay (case study) with agreed upon structure (up to three thousand words). This essay (case study) should be an analysis or discussion related to a policy that has been applied in one country and that you think should or could be applied in other countries. Also, students will make one oral presentation on a selected topic related to the course content and recommended reading ( ie. a policy suggestion or information related to minorities in Europe).
Active participation and a minimum of seventy percent attendance is required. The final grade will be based on the following criteria:
Assessment:
30% - 3 ACQIs (2 based on the reader and 1 student submitted reading) Due week 3,4,6
30% - Policy paper - topic of choice - agreed upon by instructor Due week 8
20% - Student presentation (10-15 min) Due week 10
10% - Participation
10% - Final paper defense Due week 10-12

* Course Website
- All relevant course materials, including this syllabus, can be found on the course website: dl.cuni.cz (Moodle platform) which will be updated weekly. (To access the materials go to dl.cuni.cz, search for SM628, add yourself as a student, the password will be provided during class)
- All submissions will be electronic via Moodle, instructions can be found on the Moodle web platform (help section).
- The majority of lectures will be delivered in the form of PowerPoint slide presentations which will also be placed on the website for your convenience.
- The reader is available online with the rest of the course materials. A sufficient number of hard copies will be placed at the Jinonice Library Study Room.

* AQCI: Argument, Question, Connections, and Implications
Students will be required to prepare a single sheet (A4) relating to TWO articles from the reading list in the format of an AQCI and ONE additional reading of your choice. Students must submit their chosen article for confirmation (before writing their ACQI) on the Moodle platform. Although only three AQCIs per person will be marked, students may wish to prepare one AQCI every week in order to structure their thinking about the topic.
The structure of a written AQCI should be as follows (i.e. you should keep the numbered paragraph structure): 1. CENTRAL QUOTATION. Quote a sentence (or excerpts from linked sentences) from the text that you think is central to the author's (or authors') implicit or explicit argument(s). Always cite the page. 2. ARGUMENT. In a few sentences, state the author's explicit or implicit argument. Be sure to include both: what the author is arguing for, and what s/he is arguing against (if applicable). 3. QUESTION. Raise a question which you think is not fully, or satisfactorily, answered by the text. The question should be a question of interpretation or of inquiry, not simply a question of fact. 4. EXPERIENTIAL CONNECTION. Say, in a few lines only, how the argument confirms or contradicts your own experience or common sense. 5. TEXTUAL CONNECTION. Connect the argument of this text to an argument or point you find in another reading assignment covered in this course or one you have picked up from earlier study at the university or elsewhere. Present a quote from the other text (citing it properly), and explain how the present text's argument contrasts with, contradicts, confirms, clarifies, or elaborates the other text's argument or point. 6. IMPLICATIONS. Lay out what this argument (#2 above) implies for understanding or improving society, relations between individuals, or groups (e.g. ethnic, national, etc.) or any facet of social or cultural reality and relate this to practical policy-making (a few sentences only)
AQCIs should not exceed one typed page. They should be typed or word-processed, proofread and printed with the same degree of care as essays.
* Written Report
Students are expected to deliver an essay of approx. 3,000 words on an agreed upon topic. The purpose of the essay is to enhance students knowledge of a particular area related to minorities: this may be a governmental policy, NGO action, chronic issue, or may be a more general topic students are interested in, all topics must be approved by the course leader via Moodle (for details please see the Moodle Platform).
Reports or essays should be uploaded onto the Moodle platform on or before November 27th 2007

* Standardized Marking Procedure
All written work will be graded using standard marking sheets to ensure consistency and fairness. The sample sheets can be found on the Moodle platform. All assignments must be submitted with an attached self evaluation form using the provided format which should be attached at the end of all assignments. No self evaluation = no grade.

* Rewrites policy
As a part of our aim to help students develop critical thinking and written communication skills, students will have the opportunity to rewrite their AQCIs and essays if they are not happy with their grade but only if they submit them at the latest one week in advance of the official deadline.

* Attendance and seminar participation
All students are expected to be fully familiar with every week's required readings and bring to class their own considered questions and reactions to the material. The seminar discussion is intended to enable you to develop your understanding of the readings and to exchange ideas with others. Your attendance and participation in the seminar will be reflected in your grade.

* Marking Guidelines
* Our course uses the following grading scale:

* A+ 100-90%
Work of exceptional quality showing evidence of independent judgment and the ability to think critically about the issues under discussion. Work in this category will be based on wide reading, and will present a critical evaluation of the sources used. It will contain a clear and penetrating analysis and interpretation of the concepts and arguments found in the literature including a reasoned rejection of some of these arguments. Work in this category will be well structured and well written. It will display a decree of flair and originality.
* A, A- 80-89%
Work of excellent quality showing the ability to engage with the key concepts and arguments in the relevant literature. It will demonstrate evidence of wide reading, and a clear grasp of the subject matter and main issues under discussion. The arguments will be clearly developed and evidence will be shown of a reasoned rejection of some of the arguments in the literature. The work will be suitably referenced. The work will be well written with limited grammatical errors.
* B 70-79%
Work of good quality showing evidence of a reasonable grasp of the key issues and concepts. The analysis will raise the main points but the argument is likely to lack a tight framework. The work will show awareness of disagreement among various sources. Most often work in this category will be more descriptive than analytical. There is likely to be some errors in grammar and spelling and in the use of sources.
* C 60-69%
Work of satisfactory quality showing an attempt to engage with the main issues but often lacking in breadth and depth. Work in this category will display a limited understanding of the key debates and will most often simply reproduce the arguments from a limited range of sources. The reference technique is likely to be poor with a failure to substantiate key points. The writing will be marked by poor grammar, spelling and syntax.
FAIL <60% Work which shows a failure to understand the main issues. This will be work which has limited relevance to the topic under discussion, and contains many errors of fact and interpretation. Often work of this quality will also fail to meet the word norm. It will also be characterized by poor grammar syntax and spelling.



* Sample Self assessment form
Department of Public and Social Policy, Faculty of Social Sciences, Charles University

* AQCI ASSESSMENT FORM

Student's name: Name of assessor: Date:
Essay title:

Excellent Good Average Poor Not acceptable Comments
1) Is the chosen quotation central to the author's argument?
2) Has the main argument been fully understood (including its 'for' and 'against' sides, if applicable)?
3a) Is the question raised important/relevant/interesting?
3b) Has this question not been fully answered in the text?
4) Is the experiential connection relevant/interesting?
5a) Is the textual connection relevant/interesting?
5b) Has it been cited properly?
5c) Has it been adequately explained how the present text's argument contrasts with, contradicts, confirms, clarifies, or elaborates the other text's argument or point?
6) Have the implications been well understood, can they have a practical impact for policy making?
7) Expression/Presentation
a) Are the style, grammar and general use of English adequate?
b) Is the AQCI professionally presented?

Essay grade:

Further comments:














* Other optional literature and documents
Not all of these are available- some will be on the Moodle platform, others can be found in the Libraries or through online searches.
Suggested reading.
l About the Canadian Multiculturalism Act (2 pages)
l Alibhai-Brown, Yasmin (1999) True Colours - Public Attitudes to Multiculturalism and the Role of Government, London: Institute for Public Policy Research
l Bauböck, Rainer, Rundell, John (Eds.) (1998) Blurred Boundaries: Migration, Ethnicity, Citizenship, European Center Vienna and Ashgate, Ashgate
l Breton, Raymond: From "Ethnic to Civic Nationalism - Canada", text 58, in Hutchinson, John, Smith Anthony, eds. (1996) Ethnicity, Oxford- New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 348-358
l British anti-discrimination legislation (1976, 2000 Race Relation Act, 1975/ 86 Sex Discrimination Act, 1970 Equal Pay Act, 1944/58 Disabled Persons (Employment) Act, 1995 Disability Discrimination Act, Equality Act 2007 )
l CoE Framework Convention on protection of national minorities
l EU race equality directive "Implementing the Principle of Equal Treatment Between Persons Irrespective of Racial or Ethnic Origin" Directive 2000/43/EC (adopted on 29 June 2000).
l Joppke, Christian (1995) Multiculturalism and Immigration: A comparison of the United States, Germany, and Britain, EUI Working Paper SPS No. 95/1
l Open Society Institute (November 2000), Racism in Central and Eastern Europe and Beyond: Origins, responses, Strategies, Report. Budapest, 19 July 2000
l Thompson, Neil (1993) Anti-discriminatory Practice, MacMillan, Chapter 1: The Theory Base, pp. 17-39
l UN Factsheet No 18 on national minorities; UN Fact sheet No 12 on CERD (Committee on elimination of racial discrimination)
l UN ICERD (Int convention on elimination of racial discrimination);
* Other Readings of Interest.
l CERD General Recommendations on Roma (full text)
l European Commission against racism and intolerance (ECRI): Country by country Approach, Report on the Czech Republic, CRI (97) 50, 1997
l Barany, Zoltan (2002) The East European Gypsies. Regime Change, Marginality, and Ethnopolitics.
l Baumgartl, Bernd and Favell, Adrian, eds. (1995) New Xenophobia in Europe. Comparative study of 27 countries, with an introduction by Ernest Gellner. Kluwers Academic Publishers, Dordrecht/London/Boston..
l European Commission against racism and intolerance (ECRI): Second report on the Czech
l Glavanis, Pandeli (1999) "´Race´, racism and the politics of identity" in Beynon, Huw and Glavanis, Pandeli (eds) Patterns of Social Inequality, London and New York: Longman pp. 55-73
l Guibernau, Montserrat, ed. (2001) Governing European diversity, London : Sage Publications, Chapter 1, pp.1-34
l Guy, Will (1998) Ways of looking at Roma: The Case of Czechoslovakia (1975) in Tong, Diane, ed. Gypsies: An Interdisciplinary Reader, New-York and London: Garland Publishing, Inc.
l Modood, T., Werbner, P. (1989) The Politics of Multiculturalism in the New Europe
l MRG Reports: Roma/Gypsies, Refugees in Europe, Educational Rights, Protection of minorities, etc
l Parekh, Bhikhu (2000) Rethinking Multiculturalism. Cultural Diversity and Political Theory, London: Macmillan Press
l Ringold, Dena et al. (2003) Roma in an Expanding Europe. Breaking the poverty cycle. Executive Summary. A World Bank Study, June 2003, 24 p., www.worldbank.org/roma
l Taylor, Charles (1994) The Politics of recognition, in Gutmann, Amy (ed.) Multiculturalism. Examining the politics of Recognition, Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, pp. 25-73 (a key text on political philosophy of multiculturalism!)
l Thompson, N: (2000) Promoting Equality, London: Palgrave

 
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