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Předmět, akademický rok 2021/2022
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Borders and International Migration - JSM062
Anglický název: Borders and International Migration
Zajišťuje: Katedra sociologie (23-KS)
Fakulta: Fakulta sociálních věd
Platnost: od 2021
Semestr: letní
E-Kredity: 8
Způsob provedení zkoušky: letní s.:kombinovaná
Rozsah, examinace: letní s.:2/0 [hodiny/týden]
Počet míst: 30 / neurčen (30)
Minimální obsazenost: neomezen
Virtuální mobilita / počet míst: ano / 10
Kompetence: critical thinking, data literacy
Stav předmětu: vyučován
Jazyk výuky: angličtina
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Další informace: https://dl1.cuni.cz/course/view.php?id=3980
Poznámka: předmět je možno zapsat mimo plán
povolen pro zápis po webu
při zápisu přednost, je-li ve stud. plánu
Garant: doc. Mgr. Jakub Grygar, Ph.D.
Vyučující: doc. Mgr. Jakub Grygar, Ph.D.
Mansheetal Singh
doc. PhDr. Zdeněk Uherek, CSc.
Třída: Courses for incoming students
Záměnnost : JSM061
Je záměnnost pro: JSM061
Anotace - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Mgr. Jakub Grygar, Ph.D. (13.02.2022)
The course is lectured online only.

The course provides a survey of main ideas underlying debates on international borders, cross-border migration, and politics of national/state belonging and control thereof. This course will consider the border politics involved in the making of state power, migrant strategies, and local and (trans) national communities based on assigned weekly reading. Using the EU/non-EU border as our primary loci of inquiry, we will explore the rights and reception of those who cross borders: not only geopolitical, but also linguistic, racial, economic, and cultural. Examining immigration policy and admissions policy, law enforcement along the border, media representations of migrants, and stories of border crossers, we will attempt to understand the forces that expand and constrain membership rights in these intersecting communities. How are borders constructed and contested by groups on both sides of the border? How are rights of belonging and membership transformed by migrants and “trespassers”? Border politics will be considered from an anthropological perspective allowing us to consider a wide variety of scholarly work in fiction and non-fiction, contemporary media, and border studies.
Cíl předmětu - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Mgr. Jakub Grygar, Ph.D. (14.01.2022)

Course objectives

In this class, students will gain a broadened perspective on the EU/non-EU border, and an awareness of the ways border politics are enacted locally as well as internationally. In particular, the students will:

  • understand the border as a social construction, shaped by historical, political, social and cultural contexts;
  • understand structural conditions that push people to cross borders;
  • understand the unique experiences and perspectives of border crossers; and
  • gain basic knowledge and understanding of the relationship between changing borders and identities, and changing patterns of migration and citizenship in Europe.



Literatura - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Mgr. Martin Hájek, Ph.D. (03.12.2019)

Core Obligatory reading:

BRETTELL, Caroline B. 2016. Perspectives on Migration Theory - Anthropology. In International Handbook of Migration and Population Distribution, ed. by Michael J. White. Springer Netherlands. Pp. 41-68.

DONNAN, Hastings - Thomas M. WILSON. 1999. Frontiers of Identity, Nation and State. London: Berg.

FITZGERALD, David Scott - Rawan ARAR. 2018. The Sociology of Refugee Migration. Annual Review of Sociology, 44:8.1–8.20.

 

Required reading:

ADEY, PETER. 2009. Facing airport security: affects, biopolitics, and the preemptive securisation of the mobile body. Environment and Planing D: Society and Space (27): 274-295.

ANDERSSON, RUBEN. 2014. Illegality, Inc.: Clandestine migration and the business of bordering Europe. University of California Press. Pp. 137 -176.

Anne Harris: Food Experiences of Forced Migrants in the UK

Castles, M., Miller, M.: The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World. New York, Guilford Press. chapter 1

Castles, M., Miller, M.: The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World. New York, Guilford Press.

DE GENEVA, NICHOLAS. 2002. Migrant “Illegality” and deportability in everyday life. Annual Review of Anthropology (31): 419-447.

DONNAN, HASTINGS; WILSON, THOMAS M. 1998. ‚Nation, state and identity at international borders‘, in Border Identities. Nation and State at International Frontiers. Donnan, Hastings; Wilson, Thomas M. (eds.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 1-30.

GUPTA, Akhil – FERGUSON, James. 1992. Beyond „Culture“: Space, Identity, and the Politics of Difference. Cultural Anthropology, 7(1): 6-23.

CHAVEZ, Leo R. 2006. Spectacle in the Desert. The Minuteman Project on the U.S-Mexico Border.

John Borneman, Parvis Ghassem-Fachandi 2017. The concept of Stimmung: From indifference to xenophobia in Germany´s refugee crisis. | Hau: Journal of Ethnographic Theory 7 (3): 105–135

Lee, Everett 1966. Theory of Migration. Demography 3(1): 47–57.

MASSEY, Douglas S. , Joaquin ARANGO, Graeme HUGO, Ali KOUAOUCI, Adela PELLEGRINO,J. Edward TAYLOR. 1993. Theories of International Migration: A Review and Appraisal. Population and Development Review 19(3): 431-466.

PETERSEN, William 1958. A general typology of migration. American Sociological Review, 23(3): 256-266.

Ravenstein, E. G. 1885. Laws of Migration. Journal of the Statistical Society, 48(2): 167–235.

Simone Cinotto: The Taste of Place: Italian Immigrants in New York Shape a Foodscape, 1900-1950

Vertovec, Steven 2009: Transnationalism. New York: Routledge.

 

Recommended reading:

BIERMANN, URSULA. 2002. Performing the Border: On Gender, Transnational Bodies and Technology. Globalization on the Line. Sadowski-Smith, Claudia (eds.) Palgrave.

BOURDIEU, PIERRE. 1991. Identity and representation. Elements for a critical reflection on the idea of region.  In: Language and Symbolic Power, Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

FARMAN, Abou. (2017) The Political Aesthetics of Border Walls, Anthropology Now, 9:3, 3-5

GLENNY, MISHA. 2008. McMafia. A Crime Without Frontiers. NY: Vintage House.

HEINZ Bude 2017: What does Stimmung Mean? Hau: Journal of Ethnographic Theory 7 (3): 137-139.

JANSEN C. J. 1970. Readings in the Sociology of Migration. London: Pergamon Press.

MASSEY, Douglas S. (ed.). 2005. Worlds in Motion. Understanding International Migration at the End of the Millenium. New York, Oxford University Press.

UHEREK, Zdeněk 2018. Czech and Slovak Romani on the path abroad: Migration and human personality. Romani Studies (Liverpool University Press) 28/5 (1): 79–108.

 

 

Metody výuky - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Mgr. Jakub Grygar, Ph.D. (14.01.2022)

Lectures, work in the seminars.

Požadavky ke zkoušce - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Mgr. Jakub Grygar, Ph.D. (14.01.2022)

Course Requirements

  1. Participation in class, including group activities.
  2. Three intermediate tests.
  3. Essay (research paper) deeply exploring one concrete issue discussed in the course. The paper is due May 31. There will be no grace period for late papers. (2,000 words max.)

 

Evaluation Criteria of the final essay / research paper

 

There is no obligation to make research in the field, the research paper can be based only on review of the literature. 

  1. Paper adheres to the chosen topic.
  2. Creativity of subject matter or approach.
  3. Evidence of understanding topic issues. Does the paper give the reader a clear overall picture of what is being discussed?
  4. Introduction section: problem, objective, methodology (explain how objective will be achieved), the organization of the paper.
  5. Discussion sections properly labelled and detailed. Quality of organization and discussion. Clear and effective methodology.
  6. Findings / application section.
  7. Conclusion section summarizes arguments and states recommendations. Accuracy of conclusions.
  8. References are cited correctly in the text.

Course Policies

  • Class begins on time; students are expected to be present at every session from the start to the end.
  • Students are encouraged to participate regularly in class discussions and bring the relevant readings and notes to the classes.
  • Students are expected to come to class having read texts indicated in the syllabus and ready to discuss them.
  • Students are expected to engage in academic honesty in all forms of work for this course.
  • Collaborating with other students is encouraged in cases of exchanging rough drafts for constructive criticism or brainstorming ideas for homework assignments, etc.; however, it is NOT allowed to take ideas from other students or from their works and call them your own, or to write homework assignments or take-home exams together.
  • It is NOT allowed to take ideas from any source without putting them in quotations and citing them, or by paraphrasing them. Please read How to avoid plagiarism.
  • Any student who misses more than two seminars without a valid medical excuse or due to other serious reasons will automatically be excluded from the course.
  • No late work is accepted unless the student asks for deadline extension in advance. Extensions are provided only in cases of emergency (such as medical or serious family reasons).


Grading

 

The final grade for the class will be determined by:

  • group activities (max. 20%);
  • intermediate tests (max. 30%);
  • participation in seminars (max. 10%);
  • essay / research paper (max 40%).

For each activity the student must obtain at least half of the score.

100 - 91: A (Excellent. The student has shown excellent performance, originality and displayed an exceptional grasp of the subject.)
81 - 90: B (Very Good. The student understands the subject well and has shown some originality of thought. Above the average performance, but with some errors.)
71 - 80: C (Good. Generally sound work with a number of notable errors.)
61 - 70: D (Satisfactory. The student has shown some understanding of the subject matter, but has not succeeded in translating this understanding into consistently original work. Overall good performance with a number of significant errors.)
51 - 60: E (Sufficient. Acceptable performance with significant drawbacks. Performance meets the minimum requirements.)
50 - 0: F (Fail. The student has not succeeded in mastering the subject matter of the course.)

Deadlines

A student may not submit the researcher paper more than three times, i.e., s/he has the right to two resit dates for the essay or research paper. There is no extraordinary resit date.

May 31: Essay / Research paper (resit deadlines: June 15, June 30)

 

Sylabus - angličtina
Poslední úprava: doc. Mgr. Jakub Grygar, Ph.D. (13.02.2022)

For a detailed syllabus for Summer semester 2022 please see https://dl1.cuni.cz/course/view.php?id=3980

 

Part I: INTRODUCTION

 

Week 1

Introduction to the course

(Jakub Grygar, Zdeněk Uherek)

 

Week 2 

Migration crisis on external EU borders

(Jakub Grygar)

 

Week 3 

Crisis on the PL - BY border

(Jakub Grygar + guest lecturer)

 

Week 4 

Seminar I: Reflextion of the migration crisis in public and media discourse

(Jakub Grygar, Zdeněk Uherek)

 

1. intermediate test

 

Part II: MIGRATION

 

Week 5 

Migration: basic concepts in historical perspective. 

How migration is studied. Approaches to the study of migration until the 1960s, motivation to study migration, study of migration from the perspective of various social and natural sciences.

(Zdeněk Uherek)

 

Required readings

Lee, Everett 1966. Theory of Migration. Demography 3(1): 47–57.

 

Recommended readings

Ravenstein, E. G. 1885. Laws of Migration. Journal of the Statistical Society, 48(2): 167–235.

Petersen, William 1958.  A general typology of migration. American Sociological Review, 23(3): 256-266.

 

Supporting learning materials for distance learning

§  video / podcast

§  Prezi / PowerPoint presentation

§  test

 

 

Week 6

Contemporary theoretical approaches to migration. Migration theories: individual authors, schools

The lecture discusses individual cases, which include individual migration theories.

(Zdeněk Uherek)

 

Required readings

MASSEY, Douglas S., Joaquin ARANGO, Graeme HUGO, Ali KOUAOUCI, Adela PELLEGRINO, J. Edward TAYLOR. 1993. Theories of International Migration: A Review and Appraisal. Population and Development Review 19(3): 431-466.

 

Recommended readings

MASSEY, Douglas S. (ed.). 2005. Worlds in Motion. Understanding International Migration at the End of the Millenium. New York, Oxford University Press.

Castles, M., Miller, M.: The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World. New York, Guilford Press. chapter 1

 

Supporting learning materials for distance learning

§  video / podcast

§  Prezi / PowerPoint presentation

§  test

 

 

Week 7

World Migration Streams and Trends. Transnationalism; Concept of Stimmung

The lecture discusses the issue of migration flows and related integration strategies.

(Zdeněk Uherek)

 

Required readings

Vertovec, Steven. 2009. Transnationalism. New York: Routledge.

Castles, M., Miller, M.. 1998. The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World. New York, Guilford Press.

 

Recommended readings

Massey, D.S. (ed.): Worlds in Motion. Understanding International Migration at the End of the Millenium. New York, Oxford University Press 1998, second edition 2005.

 

Supporting learning materials for distance learning

§  video / podcast

§  Prezi / PowerPoint presentation

§  test

 

 

Week 8

Seminar II: Discussion on the topic of lectures from weeks 5 - 7

(Zdeněk Uherek)

 

2. intermediate test

 

Part III: BORDERS

 

Week 9

Anthropology of borders. Bordering - ordering - othering. Fortification of Europe and surveillance

(Jakub Grygar)

 

Required readings

DONNAN, HASTINGS; WILSON, THOMAS M. 1998. ‚Nation, state and identity at international borders‘ in Border Identities. Nation and State at International Frontiers. Donnan, Hastings; Wilson, Thomas M. (eds.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 1-41.

 

Required podcasts

Borders. BBC 4: Thinking Allowed
Walls. BBC 4: Thinking Allowed

 

 

Required documentary film

The Border Fence (dir. Nikolaus Geyrhauter, 2018)

Synopsis: In October 2006, the United States government decided to build a 700 mile fence along its Mexican border. Three years and 3.1 billion dollars later, award-winning director Rory Kennedy investigates the impact of the project, revealing how its stated goals--containing illegal immigration, cracking down on drug trafficking, and protecting America from terrorists--have given way to unforeseen consequences.

 

Recommended learning resources

BOURDIEU, PIERRE. 1991. Identity and representation. Elements for a critical reflection on the idea of region.  In: Language and Symbolic Power, Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

CHAVEZ, Leo R. 2006. Spectacle in the Desert. The Minuteman Project on the U.S-Mexico Border.

FARMAN, Abou. (2017) The Political Aesthetics of Border Walls, Anthropology Now, 9:3, 3-5.

GUPTA, Akhil – FERGUSON, James. 1992. Beyond „Culture“: Space, Identity, and the Politics of Difference. Cultural Anthropology, 7(1): 6-23.

 

 

Supporting learning materials for distance learning

§  video and podcast

§  Prezi / PowerPoint presentation

§  test

 

 

Assignment 

 

A. Listen to the first 15 minutes of the podcast Borders from BBC 4 Thinking allowed series (https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000dgyp) and answer the questions:

What is the difference between borders and frontiers?

How do you understand the statement on the holy trinity of people - state - and territory?

Is the borderless world a utopia or dystopia? Why?

 

B. Watch the video on Wagah Attari border closing ceremony (). Find more information about the ceremony and explain what we can observe in the video clip. From your answer should be evident you have read required reading for today's lecture (DONNAN, HASTINGS; WILSON, THOMAS M. 1998. ‚Nation, state and identity at international borders‘, in Border Identities. Nation and State at International Frontiers. Donnan, Hastings; Wilson, Thomas M. (eds.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 1-41).

 

Team-work for 3-4 students.

The scope of the work (A+B): 1000 words max.

Deadline: xxx

 

 

 

Watch the documentary and answer following questions:

1.     What are the motivations of the social actors in the dispute with the Brennerpass / Passo del Brenner fence?

2.     Some sociologists (Henri Lefebvre, Michel de Certau, James Scott) distinguish between "strategy" and "tactics". Find more information about these terms and explain, where we can see these concepts in practices depicted in the documentary.

3.     Give 3 examples of politics and rituals performing power control at the Austrian-Italian border.

 

 

Week 10

Easter Monday, no class

 

 

Week 11 

Borders and body politics. Crossing external EU border. Surveillance

(Jakub Grygar)

 

Required reading

ADEY, PETER. 2009. Facing airport security: affects, biopolitics, and the preemptive securisation of the mobile body. Environment and Planing D: Society and Space (27): 274-295.

ANDERSSON, RUBEN. 2014. Illegality, Inc.: Clandestine migration and the business of bordering Europe. University of California Press. Pp. 137 -176.

 

Required podcasts

Surveillance. BBC 4: Thinking Allowed.

Biometric Security: Ethnographer´s dilemma. BBC 4: Thinking Allowed.

 

Recommended learning resources

BIERMANN, URSULA. 2002. Performing the Border: On Gender, Transnational Bodies and Technology. Globalization on the Line. Sadowski-Smith, Claudia (eds.) Palgrave.

BIGO, DIDIER; GUILD, ELSEPTH. 2005. Controlling Frontiers: Free Movement Into And Within Europe. Aldershot: Ashgate. Pp. 49-100. (Please note, this is ".djvu" file, for reading it you have to install a DJVU browser to your computer.)

FOLLIS, S. Karolina. Vision and Transterritory: The Borders of Europe. Science, Technology, & Human Values. XX(X): 1-28.

LOW, Setha M. (2016) Spatializing Culture: The Ethnography of Space and Place. New York and London: Routledge.
LYON, David.. 2017. The Culture of Surveillance: Watching as a Way of Life. Wiley: London.

 

 

Week 12 

Local communities and the state. Power and resistance. Loyalty and illegality

(Jakub Grygar)

 

Required reading

DE GENEVA, NICHOLAS. 2002. Migrant “Illegality” and deportability in everyday life. Annual Review of Anthropology (31): 419-447.

 

Required podcast

 

 

Required video

 

 

Recommended learning resources

ANTONOPOULOS, GEORGIOS, A. 2008. The Greek Connection(s). The social organizationof the cigarette-smuggling business in Greece. European Journal of Criminology 5(3): 263-288.

GLENNY, MISHA. 2008. McMafia. A Crime Without Frontiers. NY: Vintage House.

 

Documentary

Niggers / Niguri (2009, dir. Antonio Martino)

The small Calabrian village of Sant'Anna is "invaded" by the "Nìguri" (Blacks in Calabrian dialect). There is a center that is one of the greatest place of reception of immingrants of Europe, that reflects what happens in Italy: fear of the differences, distrust and the doubt of how to welcome the clandestine immigrants that reach our coasts. The people of Calabria, historically defined emigrant, accept unwillingly the cohabitation with the new arrivals, that attend for a long time, and often in vain, a document to be able to live in Italy and that they will very probably live in places like Rosarno, working as slaves.

 

 

Week 13 

Seminar III: Power and resistance at the EU border

(Jakub Grygar)

 

3. intermediate test

 

 
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