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Předmět, akademický rok 2022/2023
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Radicalization and Deradicalization - JPM710
Anglický název: Radicalization and Deradicalization
Zajišťuje: Katedra bezpečnostních studií (23-KBS)
Fakulta: Fakulta sociálních věd
Platnost: od 2022
Semestr: oba
E-Kredity: 6
Rozsah, examinace: 1/1, Zk [HT]
Počet míst: zimní:44 / 38 (38)
letní:neurčen / neurčen (38)
Minimální obsazenost: neomezen
Virtuální mobilita / počet míst: ne
Stav předmětu: vyučován
Jazyk výuky: angličtina
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Další informace: https://dl2.cuni.cz/course/view.php?id=4693
Poznámka: předmět je možno zapsat mimo plán
povolen pro zápis po webu
při zápisu přednost, je-li ve stud. plánu
předmět lze zapsat v ZS i LS
Garant: prof. PhDr. Emil Aslan, Ph.D.
Vyučující: prof. PhDr. Emil Aslan, Ph.D.
Mgr. Markéta Kocmanová
Třída: Courses for incoming students
Soubory Komentář Kdo přidal
stáhnout Syllabus_RAD_DERAD_WS_2022_23.pdf Syllabus prof. PhDr. Emil Aslan, Ph.D.
Anotace - angličtina
Poslední úprava: Mgr. Markéta Kocmanová (10.09.2022)
Reflecting the recent surge in violent campaigns of Al-Qaeda, ISIL and other loosely shaped regional organizations inspired by Salafi-jihadism, this course provides general understanding of the causes conducive to (violent) radicalization. Ideology, grievances, and networks as factors at play in (violent) radicalization are discussed in this course, along with the related phenomena such as Western “home-grown terrorism”, “lone-wolf” terrorism, and jihadi foreign fighters. Consequently, the second part of the course is devoted to addressing the challenges of religiously inspired radicalization, while discussing the conceptual as well as practical policy measures. Particular focus is placed at the concepts of disengagement, de-radicalization, and counter-radicalization and how these are implemented in policy-making efforts across a variety of countries.
Cíl předmětu - angličtina
Poslední úprava: Mgr. Markéta Kocmanová (23.10.2019)

See the file containing the course syllabus above

Deskriptory - angličtina
Poslední úprava: Mgr. Markéta Kocmanová (23.10.2019)

See the file containing the course syllabus above

Podmínky zakončení předmětu - angličtina
Poslední úprava: Mgr. Markéta Kocmanová (23.10.2019)

See the file containing the course syllabus above

Literatura - angličtina
Poslední úprava: prof. PhDr. Emil Aslan, Ph.D. (09.09.2019)
  • Borum, Randy. "Radicalization into Violent Extremism I: A Review of Social Science Theories." Journal of Strategic Security 4.4 (2011).
  • Souleimanov, Emil Aslan. "Religion and Civil War: The Cases Involving Salafi Groups." Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics and Religion. Oxford, Oxford University Press (2018).
  • Wiktorowicz, Quintan. "Anatomy of the Salafi Movement." Studies in Conflict & Terrorism 29.3 (2006): 207-239.
  • Kirby, Aidan. “The London Bombers as ‘Self-Starters’: A Case Study in Indigenous Radicalization and the Emergence of Autonomous Cliques.” Studies in Conflict & Terrorism 30.5 (2007): 415–428.
  • Mendelsohn, Barak. “Foreign Fighters — Recent Trends.” Orbis 55.2 (2011): 189–202.
  • Silber, Mitchell, and Arvin Bhatt. Radicalization in the West: The Homegrown Threat. New York: NYPD Intelligence Division, 2007.
  • Horgan, John. "Deradicalization or Disengagement? A Process in Need of Clarity and a Counterterrorism Initiative in Need of Evaluation." Perspectives on Terrorism 2.4 (2008): 3-8.
  • Schulhofer-Wohl, Jonah, and Nicholas Sambanis. Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration Programs: An Assessment. Folke Bernadotte Academy Research Report, 2010.
  • Vidino, Lorenzo. Countering Radicalization in America. Washington, DC: United States Institute of Peace, Special Report 262, 2010.
  • Horgan, John, and Kurt Braddock. "Rehabilitating the Terrorists?: Challenges in Assessing the Effectiveness of De-radicalization Programs." Terrorism and Political Violence 22.2 (2010): 267-291.
Požadavky ke zkoušce - angličtina
Poslední úprava: Mgr. Markéta Kocmanová (23.10.2019)

See the file containing the course syllabus above

Sylabus - angličtina
Poslední úprava: prof. PhDr. Emil Aslan, Ph.D. (04.10.2022)

Radicalization and Deradicalization (JPM710)

Winter 2022/2023

6 ECTS

Wednesdays 9.30-10.50, 11:00-12:20 (Weeks 1-6), hybrid

Fridays 14:00-15:20, 15:30-16:50 (Weeks 7-12), online only

IMPORTANT NOTE: In the winter semester of 2022/23, the classes taught by Markéta Kocmanová are held online only due to her research visit in the USA.

Students are required to enroll in the course also in Moodle, link: https://dl2.cuni.cz/course/view.php?id=4619)

Teaching method: The course is run in a so-called hybrid regime (in person as well as online) through MS Teams platform;; link to all classes (there is one link available for all groups and all teaching times):

https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_MDkzOThjNTgtNTNkMy00NGIxLWFjNDQtYTExYjlhOWUwODkw%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%22e09276da-f934-4086-bf08-8816a20414a2%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%2219c250d6-559f-487c-bf15-2ab360fcbf97%22%7d

 

Lecturers: Emil Aslan[1] and Markéta Kocmanová[2]

Invited lecturers: Jonathan Collins,[3] Kledian Myftari,[4] and Clément Steuer[5]

 

Course description

Recent decades have seen the rise of Salafi-jihadism, a religiously-inspired political ideology striving for global dominance. Al Qaeda, ISIL and other loosely shaped regional organizations adhering to this militant ideology have sought to win the hearts and minds of Muslims from the United States to the Middle East and Russia to Southeast Asia in an effort to spark what they consider a global jihad against the infidels and hypocrites.

This course offers the students a basic understanding of the causes conducive to (violent) radicalization, a complex psychological process that prompts individuals to take on violence – depending on their individual motivations – to attain political goals, to channel their individual or group frustration, to regain self-esteem and become a member of a tight-knit community, or to self-sacrifice in the name of a supposedly divine mission. Ideology, grievances, and networks as causes of (violent) radicalization are discussed in this course, along with the related phenomena of Western “home-grown terrorism”, “lone wolf” terrorism, jihadi foreign fighters, and so on.

The second section of the course focuses on the opposite processes of de-radicalization, counter-radicalization, and disengagement, that is, seeking to put militants back to peaceful life. Combining conceptual and theoretical rigor with empirical insights, this course draws on a variety of case studies to give the students a better understanding of the researched phenomena.

Aims of the course

After completing the course, students shall be able to understand and apply in practice the concepts and theories of radicalization, de-radicalization, and the related phenomena.

Learning outcomes

In addition to learning basic facts on the topic of the course, this seminar-style course is intended to contribute to developing methodological and analytical skills among the students.

Structure of the course

1)         Introductory seminar 5 OCT (Aslan)

2)         Defining radicalization and related concepts 12 OCT (Aslan)

Presentation I: Defining radicalization: Mapping the debate[6]

Presentation II: Researching radicalization: Mapping the field and its challenges[7]

3)         Causes of radicalization: Ideology, grievances, and networks 19 OCT (Aslan)

Presentation III: Sorting out radicalization theories: Three major approaches

4)         An ideology of radicalization: Salafi-jihadism 26 OCT (Guest lecturer: Clément Steuer) 

Presentation IV: The ideologies and objectives of Al Qaeda & ISIL: A comparative analysis

5)         Self-radicalization and lone wolf attacks 2 NOV (Guest lecturer: Collins) 

Presentation V: Self-radicalization: The phenomenon and its causes

Presentation VI: Lone wolf attacks: Processes and consequences

6)         Jihadist foreign fighters 9 NOV (Myftari) 

Presentation VII: Jihadist foreign fighters: Who becomes a foreign fighter and why

Presentation VIII: Western-born jihadists in Syria: Understanding the causes and contexts

7)         Seminar I: “Home-grown” jihadi terrorism in the West 18 NOV (Kocmanová)

Presentation IX: Case Study A

Presentation X: Case Study B

8)         Mid-term test 25 NOV 

9)         Defining de-radicalization and related concepts 2 DEC (Kocmanová) 

Presentation XI:  Defining deradicalization: Identifying key challenges

10)   Causes of de-radicalization 9 DEC (Kocmanová)

Presentation XII: Disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR): Mapping the field

11)   Counter-radicalization and CVE 16 DEC (Kocmanová)  

Presentation XIII: Counter-radicalization and CVE: Explaining the phenomenon

Presentation XIV: Counter-radicalization and CVE: Case Study A

12)   Seminar 2: Counter-radicalization programs 6 JAN (Kocmanová)  

Presentation XV: Evaluating counter-radicalization and CVE programs and their challenges

Presentation XVI: Counter-radicalization and CVE programs in select EU member states: A comparative analysis

 

Readings[8]

Week 1: Syllabus

Schmid, Alex P. Radicalisation, de-radicalisation, counter-radicalisation: A conceptual discussion and literature review.  The Hague: ICCT, 2013. (Recommended reading).

Hafez, Mohammed. “The radicalization puzzle.” Youtube. Youtube, 23 August 2015.

Week 2: Sedgwick, Mark. "The concept of radicalization as a source of confusion." Terrorism and Political Violence,  22.4 (2010): 479-494.

Neumann, Peter R. "The trouble with radicalization." International Affairs 89.4 (2013): 873-893.  

Borum, Randy. "Radicalization into violent extremism I: A review of social science theories." Journal of Strategic Security 4.4 (2011), till p. 14 .

Hardy, Keiran. "Comparing theories of radicalisation with countering violent extremism policy." Journal for Deradicalization 15 (2018): 76-110. Read pages 76-90.

Kundnani, Arun. "Radicalisation: the journey of a concept." Race & Class 54.2 (2012): 3-25. (Recommended reading).

Week 3: Hafez, Mohammed, and Creighton Mullins. "The radicalization puzzle: a theoretical synthesis of empirical approaches to homegrown extremism." Studies in Conflict and Terrorism 38.11 (2015): 958-975.

Souleimanov, Emil Aslan. "Religion and Civil War: The Cases Involving Salafi Groups." Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics and Religion. Oxford, Oxford University Press (2018).

Horgan, John. "From profiles to pathways and roots to routes: Perspectives from psychology on radicalization into terrorism." The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 618.1 (2008): 80-94.

Silke, Andrew, and Katherine Brown. "‘Radicalisation’: The Transformation of Modern Understanding of Terrorist Origins, Psychology and Motivation." In: State, Society and National Security: Challenges and Opportunities in the 21st Century. Ed. Jashi Jayakumar. Singapore: World Scientific (2016). (Recommended reading).

Week 4: Wiktorowicz, Quintan. "Anatomy of the Salafi movement." Studies in Conflict & Terrorism 29.3 (2006): 207-239.

Neumann, Peter R. "The New Jihadism: A Global Snapshot." International Center for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence, King’s College, BBC World Service and Monitoring, London, 2014.

Moghadam, Assaf. "The Salafi-Jihad as a Religious Ideology." CTC Sentinel 1.3 (2008): 14-16.

Week 5: Kirby, Aidan. “The London Bombers as ‘Self-Starters’: A Case Study in Indigenous Radicalization and the Emergence of Autonomous Cliques.” Studies in Conflict & Terrorism 30.5 (2007): 415–428.

Picart, Caroline Joan S. “‘Jihad Cool/Jihad Chic’: The Roles of the Internet and Imagined Relations in the Self-Radicalization of Colleen LaRose (Jihad Jane).” Societies 5.2 (2015): 354–383.

Herath, C. and Whittaker, J. (2021) ‘Online Radicalisation: Moving beyond a Simple Dichotomy’, Terrorism and Political Violence, pp. 1–22.

Recommended: Mølmen, G. N. and Ravndal, J. A. (2021) ‘Mechanisms of online radicalisation: how the internet affects the radicalisation of extreme-right lone actor terrorists’, Behavioral Sciences of Terrorism and Political Aggression, pp. 1–25.

Week 6: Hegghammer, Thomas. “The Rise of Muslim Foreign Fighters: Islam and the Globalization of Jihad.” International Security 35.3 (2010): 53–94.

Mendelsohn, Barak. “Foreign Fighters—recent Trends.” Orbis 55.2 (2011): 189–202.

Malet, David. “Why Foreign Fighters?” Orbis 54.1 (2010): 97–114.

Week 7: Silber, Mitchell, and Arvin Bhatt. Radicalization in the West: The Homegrown Threat. New York: NYPD Intelligence Division, 2007.

Schuurman, Bart, Edwin Bakker, and Quirine Eijkman. "Structural influences on involvement in European homegrown jihadism: A case study." Terrorism and Political Violence (2016): 1-19.

King, Michael, and Donald M. Taylor. "The radicalization of homegrown jihadists: A review of theoretical models and social psychological evidence." Terrorism and Political Violence 23.4 (2011): 602-622.

Silke, Andrew. "Holy warriors: Exploring the psychological processes of Jihadi radicalization." European Journal of Criminology 5.1 (2008): 99-123.

O'Duffy, Brendan. "Radical atmosphere: Explaining jihadist radicalization in the UK." PS: Political Science & Politics 41.01 (2008): 37-42. (recommended reading)

Week 8: Mid-term test

Week 9: Horgan, John. "Deradicalization or disengagement? A process in need of clarity and a counterterrorism initiative in need of evaluation." Perspectives on Terrorism 2.4 (2008): 3-8.

Horgan, John. “Individual Disengagement: A Psychological Analysis.” In: Leaving Terrorism Behind: Individual and Collective Disengagement. Ed. Tore Bjorgo and John Horgan. New York: Routledge, 2009.

Horgan, John; Altier, Mary Beth; Shortland, Neil, and Max Taylor.  “Walking away: the disengagement and de-radicalization of a violent right-wing extremist.” Behavioral Sciences of Terrorism and Political Aggression, 9.2 (2017): 63-77.

Week 10: De Vries, Hugo, and Nikkie Wiegink. "Breaking up and going home? Contesting two assumptions in the demobilization and reintegration of former combatants." International Peacekeeping 18.1 (2011): 38-51.

Muggah, Robert and Chris O’Donnell. 2015 “Next Generation Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration.” Stability: International Journal of Security & Development, 4.1 (2015): 1-12.

United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations. “Second Generation Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR) Practices in Peace Operations.” United Nations: Department of Peacekeeping Operations, 2010. Read only pages 7-31.

Souleimanov, Emil, A. and Huseyn Aliyev. The Individual Disengagement of Avengers, Nationalists, and Jihadists: Why Ex-Militants Choose to Abandon Violence in the North Caucasus. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014: 9-43.

Week 11: Hardy, Keiran. "Comparing theories of radicalisation with countering violent extremism policy." Journal for Deradicalization 15 (2018): 76-110. Read pages 91-101.

Vidino, Lorenzo. Countering radicalization in America. Washington, DC: United States Institute of Peace, Special Report 262, 2010.

Brown, Katherine E., and Tania Saeed. "Radicalization and counter-radicalization at British universities: Muslim encounters and alternatives." Ethnic and Racial Studies 38.11 (2015): 1952-1968.

Lindekilde, Lasse. "Introduction: assessing the effectiveness of counter-radicalisation policies in northwestern Europe." Critical Studies on Terrorism 5.3 (2012): 335-344. (recommended reading)

Week 12: Horgan, John, and Kurt Braddock. "Rehabilitating the Terrorists?: Challenges in Assessing the Effectiveness of De-radicalization programs." Terrorism and Political Violence 22.2 (2010): 267-291.

Cherney, Adrian, and Emma Belton. “Assessing intervention outcomes targeting radicalised offenders: Testing the pro integration model of extremist disengagement as an evaluation tool.” Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict (2019).

Gielen, Amy-Jane. “Countering Violent Extremism: A Realist Review for Assessing What Works, for Whom, in What Circumstances, and How?” Terrorism and Political Violence, 31.6 (2019): 1149-1167.

 

Course requirements

Students are expected to attend all classes, read all reading assignments before each class, and actively participate in discussions. This course is reading-intensive (approx. 70-100pp per week), which makes a daily reading routine a necessity. Students are encouraged to follow the topics of (de)radicalization, jihadist groups, and political violence in the media.

The students’ performance in the course will be assessed based on the following criteria:

·             One in-class mid-term test (20%). Test questions will be related to the first section of the course (Weeks 1-7), will mostly draw from the weekly readings, and will test the students’ factual knowledge. No notes, electronic devices or literature may be used during the test. The duration of the test is 25 min. Students are expected to take the test on Week 8. The Moodle-based Midterm Test consists of 10 mixed-type questions each of which is awarded with 2 points. Only those in serious and duly documented circumstances may be excused from the test and are to take the test upon agreement with the lecturers. Those failing to take the test whatsoever may continue attending the course, but will not acquire up to 20% ascribed to the mid-term test.

·             One 20-minutes highly analytical presentation on a chosen topic (30%). Power points are not formally required, but are welcomed and may be emailed to the lecturer and/or fellow students before class. Formally structured (introduction-main theses-core-conclusion-bibliography + three topic-related questions for class discussion) one page handouts should be distributed to fellow students and the lecturer at the beginning of each presentation. Note that presentations are to be delivered in due time; they cannot be rescheduled. Failure to deliver an assigned presentation in due time or to provide a good reason for absence from the day of presentation may result in one’s disqualification from the course. Should the students have any doubts about the structure or scope of their presentation, they are encouraged to consult the issues with the lecturer beforehand to ensure they score well on the presentation. 

·             Research papers (40%), of around 2500 words (the +/- 10% rule to the paper length applies), in Word files, to be uploaded into Moodle), due January 15th noon Central European Time. Penalties for late submission are as follows: within 24 hours: 5%; within 48 hours: 10%; 48+ hours: not accepted. Research papers have to be original pieces of research, based on the knowledge of the related scholarly literature and centered on innovative research questions. Research papers can be written individually or jointly by two authors (those students intending to submit joint papers must email their names to the lecturer (Markéta Kocmanová) by 30th November; unless they do so, they will be expected to submit a single-authored paper). For joint papers the following guidelines apply: one in charge of the non-empirical sections (theoretical and conceptual introduction, literature review) and one in charge of the empirical sections. The names of both authors and their respective share (i.e. authorship of non-empirical vs. empirical sections) should be clearly stated on the front page with each author given mark individually on his or her part of the paper.

In general (irrespective of being written by one author or co-authored), the research papers have to be in-depth and preferably innovative, rather than superficial and descriptive. They should contain references (in Chicago or Harvard Manual of Style; students should make sure that all references are quoted accurately as the papers are run on Turnitin plagiarism software), be formally organized, and have both general (conceptual and theoretical) and empirical parts. Particular attention should be paid to the interconnectedness of the theoretical and empirical sections, with empirical sections illustrating the theoretical argument. Research papers shall have the following structure: Introduction (Introduction to the topic/situating your paper in the relevant academic context/your research questions), Theoretical and Conceptual Framework (sorting out related theories/ a brief definition of the studied concept or phenomenon), Empirical (providing empirical evidence relating to your case/s), Conclusion. More specifically, the theoretical part must draw on the conceptual and theoretical perspectives covered throughout the course (radicalization, deradicalization, counter-radicalization, disengagement, etc.), in the empirical part the students are encouraged to select and analyze comparatively two case studies. Single case studies may be accepted only in exceptional cases upon prior approval from the lecturer. Students are encouraged to discuss with the lecturer their preferred topics in advance (at least 4 weeks). The lecturer may assign topics as well. Note that the research papers cannot be written on the same topic as the presentations. Feedback on individual research papers is provided by M. Kocmanová upon request by email.

·             An important note: If you decide to run your papers on some kind of plagiarism software, such as Turnitin, before the submission just to check that you have referenced everything properly, you should be aware of the fact that the system will put your paper in the global database. Subsequently, upon regular paper submission a note about the paper similarity appears to the course instructor. To prevent potential problems, the students are instructed to either not to ‘pre-check’ their papers beforehand (it is rather advisable to learn how to reference properly to avoid plagiarism-related issues, such as the use of quotation marks or pagination) or notify the course instructor responsible for the assessment of research papers and document this fact by the software system digital report that you obtain as a proof.

·             Active class participation (10%) based primarily on the discussion of the weekly readings; failure to demonstrate the familiarity with the assigned texts will prevent the students from scoring.

 

Evaluation

A - Excellent     91%-100%

B - Very good    81%-90%

C - Fairly good 71%-80%

D – Poor 61%-70%

E – Very poor 51%-60%

F - Fail                   0-50%

 

Note that the acquired scores for the presentations, research papers, mid-term test, and research papers are not negotiable, either individually or as a total. Nor may they be improved through additional performance unless specifically suggested by the lecturers. Only those acquiring up to 5 points below the minimum threshold for passing the course (45%) may go through extra reexamination to attain an E.

 

Course rules

The Code of Study and Examination of Charles University in Prague provides the general framework of study rules at the university. According to art. 6, par. 17 of this Code, “a student may not take any examination in any subject entered in his study plan more than three times, i.e. he shall have the right to two resit dates; no extraordinary resit date shall be permitted.  (…) If a student fails to appear for an examination on the date for which he has enrolled without duly excusing himself, he shall not be marked; the provision of neither this nor of the first sentence shall constitute the right to arrange for a special examination date.”

Any written assignment composed by the student shall be an original piece. The practices of plagiarism, defined by the Dean’s Provision no. 18/2015, are seen as “a major violation of the rules of academic ethics” and “will be penalized in accordance with Disciplinarian Regulations of the faculty.”

IMPORTANT INFORMATION ON RESPECTING PRIVACY:

In order to ensure the privacy and personal data protection of the students as well as the lecturers and taking into consideration the sensitive content covered in the course, the course participants are NOT ALLOWED to make audio or video recordings of the classes.

[1]                 emil.aslan@fsv.cuni.cz

[2]                 marketa.kocmanova@fsv.cuni.cz  

[3]                jonathan.collins@fsv.cuni.cz

[4]                kledian.myftari@fsv.cuni.cz

[5]                steuer@iir.cz

[6]                 Suggested literature: required and recommended readings for the class.

[7]                 Suggested literature: Neumann, Peter, and Scott Kleinmann. "How Rigorous Is Radicalization Research?" Democracy and Security 9.4 (2013): 360-382.

[8]                 All readings are required unless otherwise specified.

Vstupní požadavky - angličtina
Poslední úprava: Mgr. Markéta Kocmanová (23.10.2019)

See the file containing the course syllabus above

Požadavky k zápisu - angličtina
Poslední úprava: Mgr. Markéta Kocmanová (23.10.2019)

See the file containing the course syllabus above

 
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