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Asia Security - JPM697
Anglický název: Asia Security
Zajišťuje: Katedra bezpečnostních studií (23-KBS)
Fakulta: Fakulta sociálních věd
Platnost: od 2018
Semestr: oba
Body: 6
E-Kredity: 6
Rozsah, examinace: 1/1 Zk [hodiny/týden]
Počet míst: zimní:neurčen / neurčen (25)Rozvrh není zveřejněn, proto je tento údaj pouze informativní a může se ještě měnit.
letní:neurčen / neurčen (25)Rozvrh není zveřejněn, proto je tento údaj pouze informativní a může se ještě měnit.
Minimální obsazenost: neomezen
Stav předmětu: vyučován
Jazyk výuky: angličtina
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Poznámka: předmět je možno zapsat mimo plán
povolen pro zápis po webu
při zápisu přednost, je-li ve stud. plánu
předmět lze zapsat v ZS i LS
Garant: Mgr. Michal Kolmaš, Ph.D.
Neslučitelnost : JPM644
Je neslučitelnost pro: JPM644
Anotace - angličtina
Poslední úprava: Mgr. Michal Kolmaš, Ph.D. (24.10.2019)
The course is designed to shed light on the main security issues in the region of Asia Pacific. 20 years ago, Aaron Friedberg suspected that Europe’s past will be Asia’s future. He argued that Asia’s 21st century will be prone to security disturbances with Asian countries reverting to realist policies of national interest pursue. The lecturer of this course believes that in order to predict potential conflicts and security issues in the region, simple power analogies without cultural basis are not sufficient. This course will thus go in different direction that Friedberg’s study; it will investigate Asian security in its historical, cultural and social context. Basically, it can be divided into four parts. The first part will illustrate Asian IR theories and schools of thought. Second part will illustrate historical roots of present situation. Third part will make us understand cultural basis of the most ‘prominent’ societies in Asia (or, most relevant for current security environment, i.e. Japan, China, the Koreas, ASEAN). Fourth part will then connect these into interpretation of contemporary situation.
Cíl předmětu - angličtina
Poslední úprava: Mgr. Michal Kolmaš, Ph.D. (24.10.2019)

Upon successfully completing the course, the student should be able to identify, explain and interpret the main security issues that Asia-Pacific region is dealing with. He/she should also be able to discuss the historical roots of these conflicts and their theoretical interpretations. Students should be able to understand the security situation with regard to the regional and extraregional actors and their policy preferences. By intertwining theory with actual policy outcomes, students should be able to create their own research proposals and plans.

Podmínky zakončení předmětu - angličtina
Poslední úprava: Mgr. Michal Kolmaš, Ph.D. (24.10.2019)

Students can get altogether 100 points. This is divided into a research paper/research presentation (30) and final written test (70). For the presentation, students will choose their own topic (can discuss it with the lecturer but does not necessarily have to). The presentation will be accompanied by a 7-10 pages research (seminar) paper. The paper must possess 1) a sound research question (and, if needed, a hypothesis), 2) a theoretical evaluation and/or a literature review of existing scholarly literature, 3) rigorous empirical evaluation based in relevant academic sources. The paper is supposed to be a group work of groups of 3-4 people. Both the paper and a powerpoint presentations must be sent to the lecturer by a 1st of December.

The test will be in the form of several (most probably 7) open questions regarding the in-class lectures as well as the required literature. Students are expected to participate in class discussions.

Literatura - angličtina
Poslední úprava: Mgr. Michal Kolmaš, Ph.D. (24.10.2019)

Shambaugh, David: International relations in Asia: A multidimensional analysis. In. Shambaugh – Yahuda (2014): International relations of Asia. New York: Rowman and Littlefield, pp. 3-33

Katzenstein, Peter J. – Hemmer, Christopher (2002): Why Is There No NATO in Asia? Collective Identity, Regionalism and the Origins of Multilateralism. In. International Organization, Vol. 56, No. 3, pp. 576-607

Buzan, Barry – Amitav, Acharya (2010): Non-western international relations theory. London: Routledge. Pages 1-26

Drulak, Petr (2013): Non-western reflection on politics. Frankfurt: Peter Lang. Pages 11-21

Simone, Vera (2001): The Asian Pacific political and economic development in a global context.  California: Pearson, pp. 25-66 and 304-370

Kolmaš, Michal (2019): National identity and Japanese revisionism, London: Routledge, chapters 2 and 3

Kolmaš, Michal and Šárka Kolmašová (2018): A pivot that never materialized: American strategy to Asia under Obama and Trump, forthcoming in Cambridge Review of International Affairs, Vol. 32

Zhao, Suisheng (2011): China’s Approaches Toward Regional Cooperation in East Asia: Motivations and Calculations. In. Journal of Contemporary China, Vol. 20, No. 68, pp. 53-67

Rolls, Mark (2012): Centrality and Continuity: ASEAN and Regional Security since 1967. In. East Asia: An International Quarterly, Vol. 29, No. 2, pp. 127-139

Kelly, Michael J. – Watts, Sean (2010): Rethinking the Security Architecture of North East Asia. In. Victoria University of Wellington Law Review, Vol. 41, pp. 273-289

Ahn, Mun Suk (2011): What is the root cause of North Korea’s nuclear program? Asian Affairs, Vol. 38, No. 4, pp. 175-187

Tian, Dexin – Chao, Chin-Chung (2013): Border Institutions – What is Lacking in the Diaoyu/Senkaku Island Dispute. In. China Media Research, Vol. 9, Iss. 4, pp. 27-44

Yan, Xuetong (2001): The rise of China in Chinese eyes, Journal of Contemporary China, Vol. 10, No. 26, 33-39

Ito, Takatoshi – Rose, Andrew K. (2010): The Economic Consequences of Demographic Change in East Asia. Chicago: Chicago University Press, pp. 1-19

Sylabus - angličtina
Poslední úprava: Mgr. Michal Kolmaš, Ph.D. (24.10.2019)

Asia security/Contemporary IR in East Asia (JPM 697)

Winter semester 2019/2020

6 ECTS

Tuesday  9:30-10:50, room J3014

Lecturers

Michal Kolmas, Ph.D. (michal.kolmas@mup.cz, https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michal_Kolmas2)

Course description

The course is designed to shed light on the main security issues in the region of Asia Pacific.  20 years ago, Aaron Friedberg suspected that Europe’s past will be Asia’s future. He argued that Asia’s 21st century will be prone to security disturbances with Asian countries reverting to realist policies of national interest pursue. The lecturer of this course believes that in order to predict potential conflicts and security issues in the region, simple power analogies without cultural basis are not sufficient. This course will thus go in different direction that Friedberg’s study; it will investigate Asian security in its historical, cultural and social context. Basically, it can be divided into four parts. The first part will illustrate Asian IR theories and schools of thought. Second part will illustrate historical roots of present situation. Third part will make us understand cultural basis of the most ‘prominent’ societies in Asia (or, most relevant for current security environment, i.e. Japan, China, the Koreas, ASEAN). Fourth part will then connect these into interpretation of contemporary situation.

Aims of the course

Upon successfully completing the course, the student should be able to identify, explain and interpret the main security issues that Asia-Pacific region is dealing with. He/she should also be able to discuss the historical roots of these conflicts and their theoretical interpretations. Students should be able to understand the security situation with regard to the regional and extraregional actors and their policy preferences. By intertwining theory with actual policy outcomes, students should be able to create their own research proposals and plans.

Learning Outcomes

Structure of the course

1)      (1st of October) Introduction to the course, requirements – NO LECTURE, I am unfortunately abroad. We will do the introduction in the following week)

2)   What is EAST ASIA?

How do we define what is a region? How is region constituted? In the first lecture, we will discuss theories stemming from realist and constructivist schools and their explanation of the region formation. In order to illustrate the specificity of the context, intellectual traditions and their interpretation of region will be discussed.

Required literature: Shambaugh, David: International relations in Asia: A multidimensional analysis. In. Shambaugh – Yahuda (2014): International relations of Asia. New York: Rowman and Littlefield, pp. 3-33

Katzenstein, Peter J. – Hemmer, Christopher (2002): Why Is There No NATO in Asia? Collective Identity, Regionalism and the Origins of Multilateralism. In. International Organization, Vol. 56, No. 3, pp. 576-607

3)   IR theory, Western dominance and Asian response. Intellectual traditions and identity

This theoretical lecture will provide some useful insights into the difference between Western and non-Western international relations traditions. It will critique the prevailing intellectual dominance of the West and show, how Asian legacies were muted by Western power position. Furthermore, the class will provide a theoretical evaluation of the concept of identity and its possible applications to Asian surroundings.

Buzan, Barry – Amitav, Acharya (2010): Non-western international relations theory. London: Routledge. Pages 1-26

Drulak, Petr (2013): Non-western reflection on politics. Frankfurt: Peter Lang. Pages 11-21

4)   East Asian history

The lecture will go through the legacy of colonization and decolonization, formation of modern states and their identities. It will also mention and set into context the wars of 19th and 20th century up to the Second World War. Briefly, it will also discuss post-war developments.

Simone, Vera (2001): The Asian Pacific political and economic development in a global context.  California: Pearson, pp. 25-66 and 304-370

5)   Actors, societies and their interests – Japan and the US

In order to better understand the dynamics of East Asian security nexus, two lectures will define the role and foreign policies of major regional actors. First lecture will introduce Japan’s and Korean interests in the region with emphasis on the rise of Japanese nationalism and the evolution of Japan-Korea relations.

Kolmaš, Michal (2019): National identity and Japanese revisionism, London: Routledge, chapters 2 and 3

      Kolmaš, Michal and Šárka Kolmašová (2018): A pivot that never materialized: American strategy to Asia under Obama and Trump, forthcoming in Cambridge Review of International Affairs, Vol. 32

Optionally: Hughes, Christopher (2015): Japan’s foreign and security policy under the ‘Abe doctrine’. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, chapter 2 (security policy)

6)   Actors, societies and their interests – China, Taiwan, ASEAN

Second actor based lecture will introduce the basic definition of China’s political system and China’s perception of foreign policy conduct. It will also define China’s preferences and overall opinion about ‘others’ – both intellectual (legacy and disillusion about the tributary system) and practical (one China policy etc.). It will also briefly mention ASEAN and Taiwan’s foreign political aims.

Zhao, Suisheng (2011): China’s Approaches Toward Regional Cooperation in East Asia: Motivations and Calculations. In. Journal of Contemporary China, Vol. 20, No. 68, pp. 53-67

Rolls, Mark (2012): Centrality and Continuity: ASEAN and Regional Security since 1967. In. East Asia: An International Quarterly, Vol. 29, No. 2, pp. 127-139

7)   Contemporary issues I – North Korea, proliferation, 6 party talks

First ‘practical’ lecture will deal with the ‘North Korean’ problem. It will describe the history of Korean totalitarian regime, its basic principles and problems it has caused. It will discuss the role of international organizations and regional actors in mitigating the conflicts. It will also present initiatives such as Agreed framework, Sunshine policy or 6 party talks and their influence on the diplomatic talks.

Kelly, Michael J. – Watts, Sean (2010): Rethinking the Security Architecture of North East Asia. In. Victoria University of Wellington Law Review, Vol. 41, pp. 273-289

Ahn, Mun Suk (2011): What is the root cause of North Korea’s nuclear program? Asian Affairs, Vol. 38, No. 4, pp. 175-187

8)   Contemporary issues II – Island disputes – Senkaku/Diaoyu, the Kuriles, Paracels/Spratlys

Second practical lecture will deal with probably the biggest nowadays issues concerning relations of China with other regional countries, specifically Japan, Vietnam and others. We will discuss the history and present states of the Diaoyu/Senkaku island dispute and the Kuriles island dispute. The lecture will briefly mention other maritime disputes and tensions in the South China Sea.

Tian, Dexin – Chao, Chin-Chung (2013): Border Institutions – What is Lacking in the Diaoyu/Senkaku Island Dispute. In. China Media Research, Vol. 9, Iss. 4, pp. 27-44

9)   Contemporary issues III – rising China, cross-strait relations

Third practical lecture will concentrate on the security tension arising from the economic development of China.  China’s rise, military investment, and the history of its relations with Taiwan will be discussed. Also, United States’ role will be subject to analysis in historical and also present perspective.

Yan, Xuetong (2001): The rise of China in Chinese eyes, Journal of Contemporary China, Vol. 10, No. 26, 33-39

10)            Contemporary issues IV – American pivot to Asia and Donald Trump

      Fourth practical lecture will illustrate the ineffectiveness of Obama’s pivot policy and the lack of trust and the chaos brought by Trump’s Asia policy

            Kolmaš, Michal and Šárka Kolmašová (2019): A pivot that never existed: American Asian strategy under Obama and Trump,  Cambridge Review of International Affairs, Vol. 32, No 1

11) Contemporary issues V – soft security – demographic problems, environmental degradation, economic crises AND selected student presentations

Last security lecture will step back from hard security issues concerning the region into more ‘soft security’ problems that East Asia is dealing with. It will concentrate on the demographic problems of some Asian states (primarily Japan and China) and on the environmental degradation. It will also briefly mention economic troubles of some Asian states along with the 1990’s economic crises.

Ito, Takatoshi – Rose, Andrew K. (2010): The Economic Consequences of Demographic Change in East Asia. Chicago: Chicago University Press, pp. 1-19

12) Final game – be sure to come, you can gain extra points.

Readings

As stipulated for each lecture.

Course requirements

Students can get altogether 100 points. This is divided into a research paper/research presentation (30) and final written test (70). For the presentation, students will choose their own topic (can discuss it with the lecturer but does not necessarily have to). The presentation will be accompanied by a 7-10 pages research (seminar) paper. The paper must possess 1) a sound research question (and, if needed, a hypothesis), 2) a theoretical evaluation and/or a literature review of existing scholarly literature, 3) rigorous empirical evaluation based in relevant academic sources. The paper is supposed to be a group work of groups of 3-4 people. Both the paper and a powerpoint presentations must be sent to the lecturer by a 1st of December.

The test will be in the form of several (most probably 7) open questions regarding the in-class lectures as well as the required literature. Students are expected to participate in class discussions.

Evaluation

General Grade

Grade Specification

Percentage

A - excellent

Excellent upper (1)

100 – 96

 

Excellent lower (2)

95 - 91

B – very good

Very good upper (1)

90 - 86

 

Very good lower (2)

85 – 81

C - good

Good upper (1)

80 – 76

 

Good lower (2)

75 – 71

D - satisfactory

Satisfactory upper (1)

70 – 66

 

Satisfactory lower (2)

65 – 61

E - sufficient

Sufficient  upper (1)

60 - 56

 

Sufficient lower (2)

55 - 51

F - fail

 

50 - 0

 

Course rules

The Code of Study and Examination of Charles University in Prague provides the general framework of study rules at the university. According to art. 6, par. 17 of this Code, “a student may not take any examination in any subject entered in his study plan more than three times, i.e. he shall have the right to two resit dates; no extraordinary resit date shall be permitted.  (…) If a student fails to appear for an examination on the date for which he has enrolled without duly excusing himself, he shall not be marked; the provision of neither this nor of the first sentence shall constitute the right to arrange for a special examination date.”

Any written assignment composed by the student shall be an original piece. The practices of plagiarism, defined by the Dean’s Provision no. 18/2015, are seen as “a major violation of the rules of academic ethics” and “will be penalized in accordance with Disciplinarian Regulations of the faculty.”

 
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