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Introduction to Philosophy: A Global Approach - JPB156
Anglický název: Introduction to Philosophy: A Global Approach
Zajišťuje: Katedra politologie (23-KP)
Fakulta: Fakulta sociálních věd
Platnost: od 2023
Semestr: zimní
E-Kredity: 6
Způsob provedení zkoušky: zimní s.:
Rozsah, examinace: zimní s.:2/1, Zk [HT]
Počet míst: 70 / 70 (70)
Minimální obsazenost: neomezen
4EU+: ne
Virtuální mobilita / počet míst pro virtuální mobilitu: ne
Stav předmětu: vyučován
Jazyk výuky: angličtina
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Poznámka: předmět je možno zapsat mimo plán
povolen pro zápis po webu
při zápisu přednost, je-li ve stud. plánu
Garant: Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
Vyučující: Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
Třída: Courses not for incoming students
Je prerekvizitou pro: JPB195, JPB158
Soubory Komentář Kdo přidal
stáhnout Class Reading for Class 01 - WATCHING DOCUMENTARY Cultural Differences West and East.pdf Class Reading for Class 01 - WATCHING DOCUMENTARY Cultural Differences West and East Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout CLASS Reading for Class 02 - Theory of Knowledge I - KNOWING the world or SHAPING the world.pdf CLASS Reading for Class 02 - Theory of Knowledge I - KNOWING the world or SHAPING the world Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Class Reading for Class 03 - Wittgenstein on how LANGUAGE Shapes our view of the world.pdf Class Reading for Class 03 - Wittgenstein on how LANGUAGE Shapes our view of the world Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Class Reading for Class 04 - Epistemology II - Epistemic Justification & Scepticism.pdf Class Reading for Class 04 - Epistemology II - Epistemic Justification & Scepticism Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Class Reading for Class 05 - PRAGMATISM - William James & CS Peirce & John Dewey.pdf Class Reading for Class 05 - PRAGMATISM Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Class Reading for Class 06 - Introducing so-called CONTINENTAL Philosophy.pdf Class Reading for Class 06 - Introducing so-called CONTINENTAL Philosophy Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Class Reading for Class 07 - Metaphysics or on the Nature of Reality - from Solomon & Higgins THE BIG QUESTIONS.pdf Class Reading for Class 07 - Metaphysics or on the Nature of Reality Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Class Reading for Class 09 - The SELF - Metaphysics of Personal Identity.pdf Class Reading for Class 09 - The SELF - Metaphysics of Personal Identity Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Class Reading for Class 10 - Freedom and the Problem of FREE WILL - Solomon - The Big Questions.pdf Class Reading for Class 10 - Freedom and the Problem of FREE WILL Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Class Reading for Class 11 - Introducing LOGIC - in The Big Questions - Solomon & Higgins.pdf Class Reading for Class 11 - Introducing LOGIC Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout Class Reading for Class 12 - Philosophy Against Prejudice - Race and Gender in PHILOSOPHY - Big Questions - Higgins & Solomon.pdf Class Reading for Class 12 - Philosophy Against Prejudice - Race and Gender in PHILOSOPHY Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout SEMINAR Reading for Seminar 01 - Examples of GOOD PHILOSOPHICAL ARGUMENTS.pdf SEMINAR Reading for Seminar 01 - Examples of GOOD PHILOSOPHICAL ARGUMENTS Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout SEMINAR Reading for Seminar 02 - Arguments in EPISTEMOLOGY.pdf SEMINAR Reading for Seminar 02 - Arguments in EPISTEMOLOGY Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout SEMINAR Reading for Seminar 03 - Arguments in METAPHYSICS.pdf SEMINAR Reading for Seminar 03 - Arguments in METAPHYSICS Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout SEMINAR Reading for Seminar 04 - Arguments about PERSONAL IDENTITY and FREE WILL.pdf SEMINAR Reading for Seminar 04 - Arguments about PERSONAL IDENTITY and FREE WILL Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
stáhnout SEMINAR Reading for Seminar 05 - Unmasking Bad Arguments.pdf SEMINAR Reading for Seminar 05 - Unmasking Bad Arguments Janusz Salamon, Ph.D.
Sylabus - angličtina

INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY: A GLOBAL APPROACH - JPB156

 

ETCS: 6 credits

Prerequisites: None

Taught in WINTER Semester

 

Lecturer: Dr Janusz Salamon

 

Time: MONDAY, 9.30-11.00-12.20-13:50 (including lectures and seminars - see details below)

 

PLACE: Jinonice, classroom C520 (Seminar at 9:30) & classroom C123 (Lecture at 11:00 and seminar at 12:30) - see details below

 

CONTACTS:

Email: janusz.salamon at fsv.cuni.cz

Office hours: Monday, 12.30-14.00 & Tuesday, 14:00-15:30 (3 Tuesdays per month) at office 514 (Floor 5) in Jinonice

also at other times ONLINE after appointment at https://cuni-cz.zoom.us/j/4572739330

COURSE GOALS

Since the course is intended primarily for students of social sciences, who are in need of intellectual tools to understand the complexity of our increasingly interconnected and yet also ideologically fragmented world, its main aim is to teach the skills of careful, thoughtful, rigorous, rational analysis of beliefs, problems and questions, which find no answers in natural sciences, because pertain to specifically human, “first person”, perspective of self-conscious subjects. Thus we will treat philosophical questions as “open questions”, which unsurprisingly have no definitive answers and yet have to be confronted by every individual who hopes to live a meaningful life and by every society hopes to create conditions for flourishing life of its members. Philosophy, since its inception in Ancient Greece, China and India, teaches critical engagement with beliefs, convictions, doctrines and dogmas taken for granted by most in an unreflective manner, thus often clearing the path for a social progress (Plato’s philosophical argument in favour of intellectual equality of men and women may serve as an example). On the other hand, philosophers (including the leading thinkers of the Western tradition), like all of us, tended to be blind to their own cultural prejudices and tended to ignore the contribution of other cultures. Living at the threshold of a Global Age, thoughtful human beings need to engage in a critical but constructive way with the wealth of the diverse intellectual and ethical traditions of humanity, therefore this course adopts a “global”, that is cross-cultural perspective in addressing the eternal human questions: “Who am I?”, “What can I know?”, “What should I do?”, “What can I hope for?”

 

COURSE OUTLINE

Class 1: Philosophy in the Global Age: Theorising Cross-Cultural Differences [A double LECTURE from 11:00 till 13:50 for everyone] [PLEASE, DO THE HOMEWORK WATCHING THIS TWO-PART DOCUMENTARY:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZoDtoB9Abck&t=17s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jLh4QZDyNUA&t=186s

 

Class 2: Epistemology (I): Knowing the world or "shaping" the world?

[SEMINAR 1 for Group 1 at 9:30, followed by LECTURE at 11.00 for everyone, followed by SEMINAR 1 for Group 2 at 12:30]

 

Class 3: Philosophy of language: Wittgenstein or "the limits of my language are the limits of my world" [SEMINAR 1 for Group 3 at 9:30, followed by LECTURE at 11.00 for everyone, followed by SEMINAR 1 for Group 4 at 12:30]

Class 4: Epistemology (II): Epistemic justification and the challenge of scepticism

[SEMINAR 2 for Group 1 at 9:30, followed by LECTURE at 11.00 for everyone, followed by SEMINAR 2 for Group 2 at 12:30]

Class 5: Pragmatism on knowing and acting

[SEMINAR 2 for Group 3 at 9:30, followed by LECTURE at 11.00 for everyone, followed by SEMINAR 2 for Group 4 at 12:30]

Class 6: Introducing "Continental philosophy"

[SEMINAR 3 for Group 1 at 9:30, followed by LECTURE at 11.00 for everyone, followed by SEMINAR 3 for Group 2 at 12:30]

Class 7: Metaphysics or on the "nature of reality" [SEMINAR 3 for Group 3 at 9:30, followed by LECTURE at 11.00 for everyone, followed by SEMINAR 3 for Group 4 at 12:30]

 

Class 8: MID-TERM WRITTEN TEST for ALL: 11:00-13:50 (covers ONLY the material of classes 1-5 and Seminars 1-2]

 

Class 9: Problem of the Self or metaphysics of 'personal identity' [SEMINAR 4 for Group 1 at 9:30, followed by LECTURE at 11.00 for everyone, followed by SEMINAR 4 for Group 2 at 12:30]

Class 10: Philosophy of mind and freedom: Are we free or causally determined? [SEMINAR 4 for Group 3 at 9:30, followed by LECTURE at 11.00 for everyone, followed by SEMINAR 4 for Group 4 at 12:30]

Class 11: PPE Philosophical Problems (I) [SEMINAR 5 for Group 1 at 9:30, followed by LECTURE at 11.00 for everyone, followed by SEMINAR 5 for Group 2 at 12:30]

 

Class 12: PPE Philosophical Problems (II) [SEMINAR 5 for Group 3 at 9:30, followed by LECTURE at 11.00 for everyone, followed by SEMINAR 5 for Group 4 at 12:30]

FINAL WRITTEN EXAM  (3 exam dates will be published in the SIS in due course)

 

 COURSE READINGS.

All readings will be available in electronic format available for download from THIS course website (in the SIS).

The readings will be extracted chiefly from the following anthologies:

Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings (ed. Perry, Bratman, Fischer)

Philosophic Classics: From Plato to Derrida (ed. Baird)

Philosophy and Contemporary Issues (ed. Burr, Goldinger)

Philosophy: The Quest for Truth (ed. Pojman)

The Truth about the World: Basic Readings in Philosophy (ed. Rachels)

COURSE GRADING:

Quality participation in the SEMINAR + Final SEMINAR Essay =  30%

Mid-term In-Class Written Test                                                30%

Final Written Exam                                                                 40%

Total                                                                                    100%

SEMINAR INSTRUCTION

The seminar is mandatory. As indicated in the Syllabus (above), the seminar will be taught in 4 groups. Each student will be informed during Week 1 to which group they belong. Each student must do the relevant seminar reading in advance (the familiarity with the seminar reading will be tested through quizzes at the beginning of each seminar, therefore students who will arrive late and will not take the quiz, will loose the points awarded for the quizzes (2, 1 or 0 points for a single quiz).

The "seminar readings" are uploaded below (in the SIS, not Moodle). The seminars will consists of the discussion of the philosophical arguments introduced in the "seminar readings"

Seminar Essay will be due 48 hours before the final exam (and it will be up to the student to choose from among three final exam DATES published in the SIS in due course).

The Final Seminar Essay instruction will be discussed during seminar 4 (i.e., after the mid-term exam), since the students need to accumulate enough knowledge to be able to work efficiently on the essay.

 

SEMINAR ESSAY INSTRUCTION

DEADLINE: 48 hours before YOUR written exam

LENGTH: 1500-1600 words

STYLE (I grade only the quality/plausibility of your IDEAS and the work you put into thinking about issues, so ignore the style but you must be able to explain yourself sufficiently clearly to convince me that you took this assignment seriously.)

TOPIC: PPE is primarily about understanding how human beings function in societies, especially in the political and economic spheres. The goal of our Seminar Essay is to give you a chance to ask yourself how your study of philosophy (epistemology, philosophy of language, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind) might contribute to your thinking CRITICALLY and CREATIVELY about the real-world political and economic problems. With this aim in mind, choose 3 or 4 from among our Seminar Arguments which may have some important political or economic implications and explain how their conclusions might be APPLIED to help to analyse and solve some serious social problems humanity is currently facing. You may wish to focus on the social problems you are familiar with from your local context.

MODE OF SUBMISSION:
PDF sent to me via email. (I will scan each PDF with the anti-plagiarism software which is now capable of detecting whether the essay has been written using AI services.)

 

EXAM INSTRUCTION

The course includes mid-term written test/exam and final written exam. The exams will include TWO types of assignments: (a) writing short essays devoted to the topics selected by the students from a list of topics covering the reading material of "CLASS READINGS"; (b) brief explanations of of few "seminar ARGUMENTS" or "CASE studies". In both cases, the point of the exam will be to test the understanding of the MAIN philosophical issues explored at BOTH the lectures AND the seminars.

NB: Mid-term test will cover ONLY the material of classes 1-5 and Seminars 1-2, while the Final Exam will cover the material explored in the REMAINING lectures and seminars.

GRADING SCALE:

  • A = 91-100 % – excellent
  • B = 81-90 % – very good
  • C = 71-80 % – good
  • D = 61-70 % – satisfactory
  • E = 51-60 % – minimal pass
  • F = 0-50 % – fail

 

 

 

Poslední úprava: Salamon Janusz, Ph.D. (02.12.2023)
 
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