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Předmět, akademický rok 2019/2020
  
Islam in Europe - ECHR Case Law - HP3628
Anglický název: Islam in Europe - ECHR Case Law
Zajišťuje: Katedra jazyků (22-KJ)
Fakulta: Právnická fakulta
Platnost: od 2019 do 2019
Semestr: letní
Body: 0
E-Kredity: 4
Způsob provedení zkoušky: letní s.:písemná
Rozsah, examinace: letní s.:0/2 Zk [hodiny/týden]
Stav předmětu: vyučován
Jazyk výuky: angličtina
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Úroveň:  
Poznámka: předmět je možno zapsat mimo plán
povolen pro zápis po webu
Garant: Sean Davidson
Vyučující: Sean Davidson
doc. PhDr. Marta Chromá, Ph.D.
Anotace
Poslední úprava: doc. PhDr. Marta Chromá, Ph.D. (17.01.2018)
This course focuses on analysing decisions of the European Court of Human Rights in various cases involving the limits of free religion and free expression rights especially of Muslims. In particular the free religion rights of Muslims are the focus of much attention and high court adjudication in the last two decades. Therefore many of the cases studied in this course are quite recent, including the 2014 decision concerning the French veil law (S.A.S. v. France).

The cases analysed in this course arise in various contexts, from school to workplace to general public life. In this course, students are encouraged to critically analyse the reasoning of the ECtHR, including the proportionality test and its implications. In addition, students will compare decisions reached by the ECtHR with decisions by American high courts to gain better understanding of different legal approaches.

The course is interactive and in-class Moot Court exercises are used for applying the law to fresh cases and hypothetical scenarios. There is a marked in-class Moot Court assignment in which students are divided into either lawyers or judges and the case is heard and decided.
Požadavky ke zkoušce - angličtina
Poslední úprava: Sean Davidson (01.04.2020)

Islam in Europe – ECHR Case Law

Sean Davidson                                                                     

Course Objectives: 1) to analyse how free religion rights are interpreted by the ECtHR; 2) to consider issues concerning margin of appreciation and subsidiarity in light of the Convention; 3) to provide useful context to compare and assess various approaches to reasoning free religion cases, in both ECtHR dissenting opinions and decisions from various jurisdictions; 4) to develop skills of reasoning and critical analysis, especially through arguing and deciding cases in moot court exercises.

Course Requirements: Obtain at least 55/100 assessment points (see below)

Final Marks:  

(A-E, Erasmus students)  A: 91-100       B: 82-90        C: 73-81        D: 64-72       E: 55-63

(1-3, regular curriculum students)     1: 89-100         2: 75-88          3: 55-74 

                      

 Final Mark Assessment:

           

·         2 Moot Court exercises (April 7, May 5):  45% each

 

-Lawyers marked as a group (in groups of 2 or 3) based on oral arguments during the Moot Court hearing itself

 

-Judges marked individually on written judicial opinions (maximum 2000 words) to be turned in within one week of the Moot Court hearing

 

 

·         Preparation for Class:  10%

 

Course Program:

Week 1 (February 25): course introduction

·         European Court of Human Rights

·         Margin of appreciation

·         Balancing free expression and religion

Week 2 (March 3): Balance between freedom of expression and respect for religious beliefs

·         E.S. v. Austria (calling Muhammad a paedophile)

·         Sekmadienis Ltd. v. Lithuania (religious symbols in advertising)

·         Otto Preminger Institut v. Austria (offensive film)

Week 3 (March 10): Wearing religious symbols in public places

·         S.A.S. v. France  (French face concealment ban)

Week 4 (March 17): Teachers wearing religious symbols in schools

·         Dahlab v. Switzerland  (primary school teacher wearing headscarf)

·         Kurtulumus v. Turkey  (university teacher wearing headscarf)

·         German Constitutional Court case BvR 471/10 (ban on state school teachers wearing headscarves)

Week 5 (March 24): follow-up discussion of S.A.S. v. France and Dahlab v. Switzerland

Week 6 (March 31): Rights of parents in schools, including exemptions 

·         Lautsi v. Italy  (crucifix in classrooms)

·         Osmanoglu and Kocabas v. Switzerland  (exemption from mixed gender swimming lessons)

Week 7 (April 7):  first assessed Moot Court exercise

Week 8 (April 21):Additional cases concerning rights of parents and children

·         Folgero and Others v. Norway  (exemption from religious instruction)

·         male circumcision case in Germany

Week 9 (April 28): Religion at work, and requirements for citizenship

·         religion and the workplace (Eweida and Others v. UK, Ebrahimian v. France)

·         citizenship handshake case

Week 10 (May 5):  second assessed Moot Court exercise

Sylabus
Poslední úprava: Sean Davidson (01.04.2020)

 

Course Program:

Week 1 (February 25): course introduction

·         European Court of Human Rights

·         Margin of appreciation

·         Balancing free expression and religion

Week 2 (March 3): Balance between freedom of expression and respect for religious beliefs

·         E.S. v. Austria (calling Muhammad a paedophile)

·         Sekmadienis Ltd. v. Lithuania (religious symbols in advertising)

·         Otto Preminger Institut v. Austria (offensive film)

Week 3 (March 10): Wearing religious symbols in public places

·         S.A.S. v. France  (French face concealment ban)

Week 4 (March 17): Teachers wearing religious symbols in schools

·         Dahlab v. Switzerland  (primary school teacher wearing headscarf)

·         Kurtulumus v. Turkey  (university teacher wearing headscarf)

·         German Constitutional Court case BvR 471/10 (ban on state school teachers wearing headscarves)

Week 5 (March 24): follow-up discussion of S.A.S. v. France and Dahlab v. Switzerland

Week 6 (March 31): Rights of parents in schools, including exemptions 

·         Lautsi v. Italy  (crucifix in classrooms)

·         Osmanoglu and Kocabas v. Switzerland  (exemption from mixed gender swimming lessons)

Week 7 (April 7):  first assessed Moot Court exercise

Week 8 (April 21):Additional cases concerning rights of parents and children

·         Folgero and Others v. Norway  (exemption from religious instruction)

·         male circumcision case in Germany

Week 9 (April 28): Religion at work, and requirements for citizenship

·         religion and the workplace (Eweida and Others v. UK, Ebrahimian v. France)

·         citizenship handshake case

Week 10 (May 5):  second assessed Moot Court exercise

Studijní opory
Poslední úprava: Sean Davidson (12.02.2020)
Why Tolerate Religion? Brian Leiter, Princeton University Press (2012)
A Secular Europe:  Law and Religion in the European Constitutional Landscape, Lorenzo Zucca, Oxford University Press (2012)
Is it Fair to Give Religion Special Treatment?  Andrew Koppelman, Illinois Law Review (2006)
 
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