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Předmět, akademický rok 2019/2020
  
Legal Argumentation and Debate: First Amendment Issues in Context - HP3036
Anglický název: Legal Argumentation and Debate: First Amendment Issues in Context
Zajišťuje: Katedra jazyků (22-KJ)
Fakulta: Právnická fakulta
Platnost: od 2018 do 2019
Semestr: letní
Body: 0
E-Kredity: 4
Způsob provedení zkoušky: letní s.:
Rozsah, examinace: letní s.:0/2 Zk [hodiny/týden]
Stav předmětu: vyučován
Jazyk výuky: angličtina
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Úroveň:  
Poznámka: předmět je možno zapsat mimo plán
povolen pro zápis po webu
Garant: Sean Davidson
Vyučující: Sean Davidson
Prerekvizity : HP3016
XP//Ve slož. prerekvizitě: HM2101
Anotace
Poslední úprava: Sean Davidson (12.02.2020)
This course focuses on judicial decisions in various cases involving the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which protects freedom of expression, freedom of the press, and freedom of religion. Students will be required to analyse U.S. Supreme Court decisions and form legal arguments in both class discussions and formal moot court debate exercises.

This course concerns the following issues relating to the First Amendment: presence of religious symbols in public places; freedom of the press (including both news gathering and leaking); obscene and indecent expression; religious and political expression in the workplace.

The objectives of this course are: 1) to deepen students’ understanding of U.S. interpretation of freedom of expression; 2) to provide students the context to compare and assess various approaches to such issues; 3) to provide the framework for students to determine the appropriate boundaries of individual freedoms; and 4) to aid students in acquiring and using sophisticated legal English vocabulary and grammar.

This course is designed as a follow-up to the winter semester course titled "Legal Reasoning: First Amendment Case Law", yet naturally this course covers different topics and entirely new cases and principles that are not covered in the winter semester course.

The instructor prepares the materials for the course from the selected bibliography below, along with other supplementary materials from the U.S. Supreme Court’s database.

Irons, Peter (Editor, 1997). May it Please the Court: The First Amendment. The New Press.

Stone, Geoffrey (et al.) (2008). The First Amendment. Aspen Publishers.

Sullivan, Kathleen M. and Gunther, Gerald (2010). The First Amendment Law, 4th edition. Foundation Press.

Požadavky ke zkoušce
Poslední úprava: Sean Davidson (01.04.2020)

Legal Argumentation and Debate:  First Amendment Issues in Context

Sean Davidson                                                                     

 

Course Objectives:

1) to examine high court cases on the First Amendment and issues related to freedom of expression, freedom of religion, and freedom of the press; 2) to compare and assess the U.S. Supreme Court decisions to those of other courts, including the European Court of Human Rights; 3) to develop skills of reasoning and critical analysis, especially through arguing and deciding cases in moot court exercises.

 

Course Requirements:  Obtain at least 55/100 assessment points (see below)

 

Final Marks:  

(A-E, Erasmus)  A: 91-100       B: 82-90        C: 73-81        D: 64-72        E: 55-63

(1-3, regular curriculum students)     1: 89-100         2: 75-88          3: 55-74 

 

Final Mark Assessment:

           

·         2 Moot Court exercises (April 7, May 5):  45% each

 

-Lawyers marked as a group based on oral arguments during the Moot Court hearing itself (in groups of 2 or 3)

 

-Judges marked individually on written judicial opinions (maximum 2000 words) to be turned in within one week of the Moot Court hearing

 

 

·         Preparation for Class:  10%

 

Course Program:

Week 1 (February 25): Course introduction

·         Interpreting the First Amendment

·         Is religion special?

·         Considering psychology studies

Week 2 (March 3): Establishment clause - religious symbols in public places

·         Lynch v. Donnelly (nativity scene)

·         Allegheny v. ACLU (nativity scene)

·         Analysing the endorsement test

Week 3 (March 10): Religious symbols in public places (cont’d.)

·         Van Orden v. Perry (ten commandments)

·         Town of Greece v. Galloway (prayer at town meetings)

·         Ceremonial deism

Week 4 (March 17): informal moot court exercise – prayer at presidential inauguration

Week 5 (March 24):  Freedom to publish

·         New York Times v. United States (Pentagon Papers)

·         Nebraska Press v. Stuart (media coverage of trials)

Week 6 (March 31):  Right to be forgotten (right to erasure) – EU perspective

·         German case concerning murderer’s right to be forgotten

·         Dutch surgeon case

·         Comparison to U.S. Supreme Court (Florida Star v. B.J.F.)

Week 7 (April 7):  first assessed Moot Court exercise

Week 8 (April 21):  Right to gather news 

·         Branzburg v. Hayes (anonymous sources)

·         Comparison to ECtHR

Week 9 (April 28): Indecent expression

·         FCC v. Pacifica Foundation (broadcasting vulgar speech)

·         Erzoznik v. Jacksonville (publicly visible screen nudity)

Week 10 (May 5):  second assessed Moot Court exercise

 

Sylabus
Poslední úprava: Sean Davidson (01.04.2020)

 

 

Course Program:

Week 1 (February 25): Course introduction

·         Interpreting the First Amendment

·         Is religion special?

·         Considering psychology studies

Week 2 (March 3): Establishment clause - religious symbols in public places

·         Lynch v. Donnelly (nativity scene)

·         Allegheny v. ACLU (nativity scene)

·         Analysing the endorsement test

Week 3 (March 10): Religious symbols in public places (cont’d.)

·         Van Orden v. Perry (ten commandments)

·         Town of Greece v. Galloway (prayer at town meetings)

·         Ceremonial deism

Week 4 (March 17): informal moot court exercise – prayer at presidential inauguration

Week 5 (March 24):  Freedom to publish

·         New York Times v. United States (Pentagon Papers)

·         Nebraska Press v. Stuart (media coverage of trials)

Week 6 (March 31):  Right to be forgotten (right to erasure) – EU perspective

·         German case concerning murderer’s right to be forgotten

·         Dutch surgeon case

·         Comparison to U.S. Supreme Court (Florida Star v. B.J.F.)

Week 7 (April 7):  first assessed Moot Court exercise

Week 8 (April 21):  Right to gather news 

·         Branzburg v. Hayes (anonymous sources)

·         Comparison to ECtHR

Week 9 (April 28): Indecent expression

·         FCC v. Pacifica Foundation (broadcasting vulgar speech)

·         Erzoznik v. Jacksonville (publicly visible screen nudity)

Week 10 (May 5):  second assessed Moot Court exercise

 

Podmínky zakončení předmětu
Poslední úprava: Sean Davidson (12.02.2020)

Podíl garanta na výuce činí 100 %

Studijní opory - angličtina
Poslední úprava: Sean Davidson (12.02.2020)
Rethinking the Constitutionality of Ceremonial Deism, Steven B. Epstein, Columbia Law Review Vol. 96 No. 8 (December 1996)
NSA Metadata Collection and the Fourth Amendment, Joseph D. Mornin, Berkeley Technology Law Journal Vol. 29 Issue 4 (2014)
The First Amendment, Geoffrey Stone (et al.), Aspen Publishers (2008)
May it Please the Court: The First Amendment, Peter Irons (Editor), The New Press (1997)
 
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