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Předmět, akademický rok 2019/2020
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Anthropological Theories - AET100198
Anglický název: Anthropological Theories
Zajišťuje: Ústav etnologie (21-UETN)
Fakulta: Filozofická fakulta
Platnost: od 2019
Semestr: zimní
Body: 0
E-Kredity: 6
Způsob provedení zkoušky: zimní s.:
Rozsah, examinace: zimní s.:2/2 Zk [hodiny/týden]
Počet míst: neomezen / neomezen (neurčen)
Minimální obsazenost: neomezen
Stav předmětu: vyučován
Jazyk výuky: angličtina
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Úroveň:  
Poznámka: předmět je možno zapsat mimo plán
povolen pro zápis po webu
Garant: John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
Vyučující: John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
Rozvrh   Nástěnka   
Soubory Komentář Kdo přidal
stáhnout Debate format.docx John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout discussion questions.doc John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout Syllabus Theories Charles U.docx John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 01. marx-engels.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 02. marx.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 03. spencer.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 04. morgan.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 05. morgan.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 06. boas..pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 07. mead.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 08. malinowski.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 09. radcliffe-browne.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 10. radcliffe-browne2.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 11. stewart.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 12. wilson.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 13. wilson2.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 15. gould.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 16. marks.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 17. harris1.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 18. harris2.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 19. wolf.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 20. levi-strauss.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 21. Strukturální antropologie, s. 39-54, s. 182-204.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 22. douglas.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 23. turner.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 24. turner2.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 25. turner3.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 26. geertz thick description.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 26a. GEERTZ_Zhusteny-popis.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 27. geertz deep play.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 28. slocum.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 29. ehrenberg.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 30. clifford.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 31. tyler.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 32. marcus and fisher.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 33. foucault.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 34. bourdieu.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 35. rubel and rosman.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 36. lamphere.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 37. appadurai.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
stáhnout 38. boskovic -eriksen.pdf John Michael Coggeshall, Ph.D.
Anotace -
Poslední úprava: PhDr. Barbora Půtová, Ph.D., Ph.D. (07.06.2019)
Examines various anthropological theories and their utility in explaining contemporary global issues. Students
read, discuss and compare original theoretical works, and synthesize ideas through class writings and debates.

DATE DISCUSSION TOPIC READING

02/10 Course Introduction NONE

07/10 Marxism “Bourgeois and proletarians” (Marx/Engels) and
“Contribution to a critique of political economy” (Marx)

09/10 Early Theories “Organic analogy reconsidered” H. Spencer and “Ethnical
periods” and “Preface,” L. H. Morgan

14/10 Franz Boas “Methods of ethnology”

16/30 Margaret Mead “Introduction” to Coming of age in Samoa

21/10 Malinowski “Subject, Method, and Scope of this inquiry” in Argonauts of the
W. Pacific

23/10 Structural-Functionalism “Concept of function”+ “Social structure” Radcliffe-Brown

28/10 Independence Day No class

30/10 Multilinear Evolution “Multilinear evolution” and “Concept and Method of
Cultural Ecology” J. Stewart

04/11 Sociobiology 2 chapters from On human nature E. O. Wilson

06/11 Neo-Sociobiology “Beyond ‘nature v. culture’” (Nettle), “Biological potentiality”
(Gould), and “Evolutionary Psychology” (Marks)

11/11 Cultural Materialism 2 chapters from Cultural Materialism M. Harris

13/11 Political Economy “Introduction” to Europe and the people without history (Wolf)

18/11 Structuralism 2 chapters from Structural Anthropology C. Levi-Strauss

20/11 Structuralism “Genesis as myth” (Leach) and “Meaning of myth” (Douglas)

25/11 Symbolism “Introduction,” “Symbols in Ndembu ritual,” “Ritual symbolism,” and
“Betwixt and between,” 4 chapters from Forest of symbols (V. Turner)

27/11 Interpretivism “Thick description” and “Notes on the Balinese Cockfight” C. Geertz

02/12 Feminism “Role of women in human evolution” (Ehrenberg) and “Woman the
gatherer: male bias in Anthropology” (Slocum)

04/12 Post-Modernism “Partial truths” (Clifford) and “Post-modern ethnography” (Tyler)

09/12 Post-Modernism “Crisis of representation” G. Marcus and M. Fischer

11/12 Post-Post Modernism “Birth of the asylum” (Foucault) and “Production and
reproduction of legitimate language” (Bourdieu)


16/12 Contemporary critiques “Past and future of anthropology” (Rubel and Rosman) and
“Unofficial histories” (L. Lamphere)

18/12 Global Anthropology “Disjuncture and difference” (Appadurai) and “Introduction” to
Other peoples’ anthropologies (Boskovic and Eriksen
23/12 – 01/01 Holiday Break No class

06/01 Class Debate: Science vrs. Humanity (Final Exam distributed)

08/01 Class Debate: Materialism vrs. Ideology

13/01 Class Debate: Applied vrs. Neutral

15/01 Final Discussion None

17/01 FINAL EXAM Submit electronically. Due by 17:00.
Cíl předmětu - angličtina
Poslední úprava: PhDr. Barbora Půtová, Ph.D., Ph.D. (05.06.2019)

COURSE OVERVIEW AND OBJECTIVES:

1. Overview--to provide students with a chance to explore a variety of anthropological theories through readings and discussions of selected primary sources.

2. Educational Competencies:

a. to explain several significant anthropological theories;

b. to compare and contrast conflicting theoretical perspectives to demonstrate critical thinking skills;

c. to evaluate one theory as the “best” explanation for human behavior;

d. to utilize oral and written communication skills

Požadavky ke zkoušce - angličtina
Poslední úprava: PhDr. Barbora Půtová, Ph.D., Ph.D. (05.06.2019)

COURSE MECHANICS

1. Please remember your grade does not depend upon your time or effort but upon the outcomes of that time and effort, as measured by the criteria described below. Thus, it is crucial to make your time and effort productive. Please see me as soon as possible if you are having difficulties.

2. Lectures-none. Classes will consist of discussions based on the readings due that day. Please locate the discussion questions for that class period, read through them, and then complete the reading. Please don’t read the questions and then try to find the answers in the readings. Instead, it is critical that you read and understand the material before thinking seriously about the discussion questions. I also highly recommend that you take notes on the material (summarizing the main points) while you read; then, you will have a summary of the article’s content for review for exams and later readings.

3. Text-none. Instead, I have selected readings from book chapters or articles from professional journals. These are original sources, by the theorists themselves (or their critics), and are often challenging (but certainly not impossible) to read. Please follow my suggestions for taking notes and utilizing the discussion questions.

4. Since this is a seminar class, discussion is very important. At the same time, I know that (almost all of) you are using English as a second language. Please understand that I am not grading you or evaluating you on grammar or pronunciation (in speaking or in writing). I just want to hear your thoughts and ideas. Please feel comfortable in speaking, and do not worry about your spoken or written English. As long as I (and the others) can understand you, that is fine.

5. Academic dishonesty in any form is not tolerated, and violators will be punished with the maximum penalty. Please do your own research and writing, and do not copy off of other students’ work.

GRADES AND ASSIGNMENTS

1. Grades are an objective measure of your ability to master the required material within a specified period of time. Note that I cannot evaluate the time or effort you spend on this class, but can only evaluate the outcomes of that time and effort. Therefore, make your time and effort as productive as possible. Grades will be weighed as follows:

Attendance 50 points 12.5%

Essays (11@10 pts ea.) 110 points 27.5%

Debate Participation 40 points 10%

Debate Evaluation (2 x 40 pts.) 80 points 20%

Final Exam 120 points 30%

400 points possible

2. Scale--final grades will be based on a 400-point scale, as follows:

A = 360 points or above

B = 320 to 359 points

C = 280 to 319 points

D = 240 to 279 points

F = 239 points or below

3. Attendance points. Attendance in a senior seminar is expected. Attendance will be monitored daily, and being present, seated by class time, and intellectually engaged during the entire class will earn you generally 2 points per discussion class. On the other hand, lateness (- .5 or - 1 pt), absences, or intellectual disengagement will negatively affect your grade.

4. In-Class Essays-at the beginning of class, you will be asked to write for about 10 minutes on one of the “reading questions” for that class. I will select the question that you will respond to. You may use your notes (but NOT the articles or text) to assist you. If you take notes on computer, please print those off; you cannot have an open electronic screen for the essay writing. Thus, it is important to have taken summary notes of the articles assigned for that day. I will drop the lowest one of your essay scores, but I recommend writing all 12 and then dropping the lowest.

General Essay Grading Criteria:

10 pts = exceptional.

09 pts = detailed; your own ideas.

08 pts = sufficient details; information from reading(s).

07 pts = details need elaborating but demonstrated had understood assignment.

06 pts = some evidence had read but not understood.

04 pts = honestly admit did not read.

01 pts = no evidence had read.

6. Debates - students will divide into teams, and each team will take one side of a debate. A specific question will be assigned later, but the general topics will be “Science vrs. Humanities,” “Materialism vrs. Ideology,” and “Applied vrs. Neutral.” The debates will follow a specific format and student participants will be evaluated on their ability to (a) support their side with specific evidence (professional citations as well) and (b) to counter the arguments of their opponents. Audience members will complete a two to three page paper describing which side had the better argument, so it is highly recommended to take notes during the debates as well. Specific guidelines for the debate and methods for evaluation will be distributed at a later date. Because your team is counting on your participation, and because you must be present to determine which side is more effective, attendance on these dates is critical.

7. Final Exam - the final will consist of essay questions asking you to compare and contrast ideas discussed throughout the semester. You may not consult your fellow students, but you may refer to any of the assigned readings. Please remember to cite appropriately. The exam will be take-home and must be typed. It will be due on Friday, 17 January, by 17:00. (hard copy or electronically).

E. LATE ASSIGNMENTS AND MAKE-UP WORK

1. Because of the critical importance of class discussions, but also realizing that emergencies do arise, students who miss a class for an appropriate reason (as defined by me) must meet with me independently and be prepared to discuss the assigned readings from that day as soon as possible after a missed class.

2. Missed in-class essays: should you miss class for a legitimate reason (as evaluated by me), I will give you the average of your other essay scores for the missed essay.

3. Late final exams are reduced by at least 10%.

4. There is no extra-credit work for this course.

 
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