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Předmět, akademický rok 2019/2020
  
Circulating within the Postmodern Cinematic Image - AAALE010AE
Anglický název: Circulating within the Postmodern Cinematic Image
Zajišťuje: Zahraniční oddělení (21-ZO)
Fakulta: Filozofická fakulta
Platnost: od 2016
Semestr: letní
Body: 0
E-Kredity: 5
Způsob provedení zkoušky: letní s.:
Rozsah, examinace: letní s.:0/3 Zk [hodiny/týden]
Počet míst: neurčen / neurčen (15)
Minimální obsazenost: neomezen
Stav předmětu: vyučován
Jazyk výuky: angličtina
Způsob výuky: prezenční
Úroveň:  
Je zajišťováno předmětem: AAALE010A
Poznámka: předmět je možno zapsat mimo plán
povolen pro zápis po webu
Garant: doc. Erik Sherman Roraback, D.Phil.
Třída: Exchange - 03.4 Photography, Cinematography
Exchange - 09.2 General and Comparative Literature
Rozvrh   Nástěnka   
Anotace
Poslední úprava: doc. Erik Sherman Roraback, D.Phil. (26.01.2020)
COURSE DESCRIPTION AND LEARNING OBJECTIVES:<br>
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This inter-disciplinary and “indisciplinary” (Jacques Rancière) seminar is modeled on the epistemological notion of an American-informed postmodernity/globalization and now indeed post-post-modernity deglobalization, which informs our contemporaneity, and which by extension for us as such produces the pedagogic matter in our class that engages a select examination of global films from the following post-war world-directors of narrative cinema: Chantal Akerman (Belgium), Michelangelo Antonioni (Italy), Rainer Werner Fassbinder (Germany), Terrence Malick (USA), Alain Resnais (France), Andrei Tarkovsky (USSR), and Orson Welles (USA), (i.e., post-1947 Occidental and Soviet cinema). Special focus will be given to those cinematic moments that teach and that train us in new non-dominatory viewing strategies, in new creative/decreative ways of circulating (our term for not only economic circulation, but for interpretive work of the moving eye and mind and so of motion too) and in new nonsadistic ways of engaging with the most essential element of the cinema: the aesthetic unit of the image. Film criticism and film philosophy from Nico Baumbach (USA), Walter Benjamin (Germany), Leo Bersani-Ulysse Dutoit (USA), David A. Cook (USA), Gilles Deleuze (France), Niklas Luhmann (Germany), Todd McGowan (USA), Edgar Morin (France), Jacques Rancière (France), Erik S. Roraback (USA/Czech Republic), Steven Shaviro (USA), Bernard Stiegler, (France), François Truffaut (USA) and Slavoj Žižek (Slovenia/UK), will be our principal objects of focus. All films are either in English or have English inter-titles or sub-titles. Clips and special features from the DVDs will also be shown. Strategically, we shall engage our target pictures in a non-orthodox counter chronological way in order to undercut over facile teleological ways of thinking and of reasoning; this strategic intention will also provide us with a different perspective on the cultural development of perhaps one of the more important and influential cultural forms of the twentieth-century, the cultural system of film. Programs:<br>
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UALK-Charles University (Anglophone Literatures and Cultures: Centre for Critical & Cultural Theory elective course and American Literature and Cultural Studies optional/extension course); ERASMUS-Charles University.
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MATERIAL <br>
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Videos: see schedule; selections from the following critical and theoretical texts will be available in a course-reader or: will be adduced in the lectures or readings authored by the instructor:<br>
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Baumbach, Nico: Cinema/Politics/Philosophy (Columbia UP, 2019).
Benjamin, Walter: selected texts from the series of volumes with Harvard UP to be announced<br>
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Bersani, Leo and Ulysse Dutoit: Arts of Impoverishment: Beckett, Rothko, Resnais (Harvard UP, 1993).<br>
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_____ . Forms of Being: Cinema, Aesthetics, Subjectivity (BFI, 2004). <br>
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Bird, Robert. Andrei Rublev. (BFI, 2004).<br>
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Conrad, Peter: The Stories of His Life: Orson Welles (Faber & Faber, 2003).<br>
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Cook, David A.: A History of Narrative Film (Norton, 2004).<br>
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Deleuze, Gilles: Cinema 1: The Movement-Image, trans. Hugh Tomlinson and Barbara<br>
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Habberjam (U of Minnesota P, 1986). <br>
_____ . Cinema 2: The Time-Image, trans. Hugh Tomlinson and Robert Galeta (U of Minnesota P, 1989).<br>
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Lambert, Gregg: “The Brain is the Screen: An Interview with Gilles Deleuze” in Flaxman, Gregory, ed., The Brain is the Screen: Deleuze and the Philosophy of Cinema (U of Minnesota P, 2000).<br>
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Le Fanu, Mark. Stalker in The Cinema of Andrei Tarkovsky (BFI, 1987) pp. 92-107.<br>
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Luhmann, Niklas: The Reality of the Mass Media, trans. Kathleen Cross (Stanford UP, 2000).<br>
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McGowan, Todd: The Real Gaze: Film Theory after Lacan (SUNY P, 2007). <br>
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Morin, Edgar: The Cinema, or The Imaginary Man, trans. Lorraine Morimer (U of Minnesota P, 2005). <br>
_____ . The Stars, trans. Richard Howard, foreword Lorraine Mortimer (U of Minnesota P, 2005).<br>
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Nancy, Jean-Luc: The Creation of the World; or, Globalization, trans. with an intro. Francois Raffoul and David Pettigew (SUNY P, 2007).<br>
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Naremore, James: The Magic World of Orson Welles (OUP, 1978 reprinted at Southern Methodist UP, 1989).<br>
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Ranciere, Jacques: Film Fables, trans. Emiliano Battista (Berg, 2006). <br>
_____ . The Future of the Image, trans. Gregory Elliott (Verso, 2007).<br>
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Roraback, Erik S.: a select band of essays adduced below (some published and / or presented at conferences) from a book that is being prepared for publication.<br>
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Shaviro, Steven: The Cinematic Body, Theory Out of Bounds, Volume 2 (U of Minnesota P, 1993).<br>
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Thomsen, Christian Braad: The Double Man;Bavaria and Hollywood; and Querelle; in Fassbinder: The Life and Work of a Provocative Genius, trans. Martin Chalmers (Faber and Faber, 1997) pp. 1-44, 101-10 and 302-11.<br>
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Truffaut, Francois: “ Foreword to Andre Bazin Orson Welles: A Critical View (Acrobat, 1978), pp. 1-27.<br>
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Žižek, Slavoj, ed.: Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Lacan But Were Afraid to Ask Hitchcock (Verso, 2010).<br>
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COURSE REQUIREMENTS
To receive credit for the seminar all students must 1) have no more than two absences; arriving more than ten minutes late at the beginning of the seminar or leaving early will be considered an absence for that full session. 2) give one oral presentation on a film and on the required text(s) for that week 3) submit a mid-term essay and 4) produce a final essay. This final essay will count as the graded essay for the Charles University students who sign up for it. Final essay (3000 words): 30%, Mid-term essay (1500 words): 20%, Oral presentation: 20%, Attendance and participation: 30%. Essay topics will be distributed at least two weeks before they are due. Erasmus students will receive credit and a grade in the respective credit and E boxes on the SIS so long as they sign up for both. During class time, mobile phones are to be off and computers may be on for note-taking only and not for doing work online.

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Weekly Schedule: <br>
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18 and 25 February: American Neo-Noir & the American Sublime<br>
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Pre-film lecture and screening: Badlands (1974, 95 min., dir. Terrence Malick); The Thin Red Line (1998, 170 min., dir. Terrence Malick)<br>
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Post-film lecture/discussion<br>
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Readings: E. Roraback: Revised version of an essay first presented as “The Dialectic of Cinema and Silence; or, Forms and Structures for Moving Across Badlands (1974)” at the Olomouc International Symposium on American Studies, ‘America in Motion’, 7-10 September 2008, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic.<br>
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E. Roraback: Revised version of “Terrence Malick’s The Thin Red Line (1998) and Circulating within the Heideggerian Cinematic Image” first presented as a guest lecture, 16 May 2006, Philosophy Dept., Universität Wien, Austria.<br>
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3 March: The Chantal Akerman Phenomenon
Je Tu Il Elle (I You He She, 1974, French with English subtitles, 86 minutes, dir. Chantal Akerman). Rdgs: To be announced.
10 and 17 March: Soviet Cinema, Icon Art and the Medieval Pre-film lecture and screening: Andrei Rublev (1966, Russian with English subtitles, 205 minutes, dir. Andrei Tarkovsky). Post-film lecture/discussion Rdgs: D. Cook, A History, pp. 696–98. E. Roraback "Medieval Immobilizings and the Atheological Unconscious in Tarkovsky's Andrei Rublev (1966)". CD extract: F. Couturier: "Andrei" (to Eduard Artemiev) 7:05 minutes from F. Couturier, Nostalghia—Song for Tarkovsky (Munich: ECM, 2006)
24 March: Das Neue Kino: Fassbinder (New German Cinema)<br>
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Pre-film lecture and screening: The Merchant of Four Seasons (Der Händler der vier Jahreszeiten, 1971, German with English subtitles, 88 minutes,dir. Rainer Werner Fassbinder). Rdgs: D. Cook: A History, pp. 582-604. E. Roraback: “Fassbinder and Cinematic Intensity”. C. B. Thomsen: “The Double Man”, “Bavaria and Hollywood” and<br>
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“Querelle” in Fassbinder: The Life and Work of a Provocative Genius, trans. Martin Chalmers (Faber and Faber, 1997) pp. 1-44, 101-10 and 302-11.<br>
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Will discuss: Berlin Alexanderplatz (1980, German with English subtitles, 940 minutes, dir. Rainer Werner Fassbinder). <br>
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31 March and 7 April: Post French New Wave Cinema, Life and Death Pre-film lecture and screening: Providence (1976, English, 102 minutes, dir. Alain Resnais). Readings: L. Bersani and U. Dutoit: pp. 147-208, 221-25. E. Roraback: Revised version of an essay “Aesthetic Regions: or, The Double-Edges, Folds & Visions of Time & of Memory of Alain Resnais’s Muriel (1965) & Providence (1976)” first presented at the 33rd annual conference of the International Association of Philosophy and Literature, conference them: “Double Edges: rhetorics, rhizomes, regions”, Brunel University, West London, UK, 1-7 June 2009. Will discuss: Lancelot of the Lake (1974, French with English subtitles, dir. Robert Bresson). The French New Wave and Cinematic Hallucinations Pre-film lecture and screening: Muriel, 1965, French with English subtitles, 119 minutes, dir. Alain Resnais. Post-film lecture/discussion Rdgs: L. Bersani and U. Dutoit: pp. 1-9, 147-208, 221-25. D. Cook: A History, pp. 456-58. G. Deleuze: pp. 116-25 and 204-16 in Cinema 2. E. Roraback: Revised version of an essay “Aesthetic Regions: or, The Double-Edges, Folds & Visions of Time & of Memory of Alain Resnais’s Muriel (1965) & Providence (1976)” first presented at the 33rd annual conference of the International Association of Philosophy and Literature, conference them: “Double Edges: rhetorics, rhizomes, regions”, Brunel University, West London, UK, 1-7 June 2009. <br>
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Mid-Term Essay Due 7 April.
14 and 21 April: After Italian Neorealism and Contemporary Eros Pre-film lecture and screening: L’Avventura (1959, English, 141 minutes, dir. Michelangelo Antonioni). Post-film lecture/discussio Rdgs: D. Cook: A History, pp. 535-39. E. Roraback: Revised version of an essay first published as “The Colors and the Spinozist Bodies of Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’Avventura (The Adventure or The Fling, 1959)” EREA 3.1 (printemps 2005): ix-xviii, Univ. de Provence. S. Shaviro: The Cinematic Body, pp. 255-69 Will discuss: L’Eclisse (1962, dir. Michelangelo Antonioni); Blow-Up (1966, dir. Michelangelo Antonioni), The Passenger (1975, dir. Michelangelo Antonioni).<br>
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28 April and 5 May: American Film Noir II Screening: Touch of Evil (1958, year 2000-released 111 minute version) Rdgs/will discuss: Erik Roraback., “The Cinematic Baroque: Excessively Noirish Film: Orson Welles’s Early-Style The Lady from Shanghai (1948) and Mid-Style Touch of Evil (1958)”. Pre-film talk and screening: The Lady from Shanghai (1948, 87 minutes, dir. Orson Welles). Recommended (not required) viewing related to the Film Noir component of the course that students may wish to find and to pursue on their own, e.g. FAMU film library, etc.: classic American film noir such as: Dark Passage; In a Lonely Place; Mildred Pierce, Murder, My Sweet; Out of the Past; The Big Heat; The Night of the Hunter; The Postman Always Rings Twice Post-film lecture/discussion Rdgs/will discuss.:E. Roraback, “The Cinematic Baroque; or, Excessively Noirish Film: Orson Welles’s Early- Style The Lady from Shanghai (1948) and Mid-Style Touch of Evil (1958)” later version of a paper first presented at the University of Szeged, Hungary, on 20 November 2003: on “Deleuze, Orson Welles and the Cinematic Baroque”.<br>
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12 May: The Euroamerican Sublime Pre-film talk and screening Mr. Arkadin/Confidential Report (The Comprehensive Version, 1955, 105 minutes, dir. Orson Welles). Post-film lecture/discussion Readings: G. Deleuze: pp. 98-155 in Cinema 2: The Time-Image. E. Roraback: Revised version of an essay first published as “Circulating within Orson Welles’s Mr. Arkadin/Confidential Report for a Newly Armed Eye” in the conference proceedings from the 8th Brno Conference of English, American and Canadian Studies, 2005. F. Truffaut: “Foreword” to André Bazin’s Orson Welles: A Critical View, pp. 1-27.<br>
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Final essay due 26 May 2020.<br>
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