SubjectsSubjects(version: 901)
Course, academic year 2022/2023
  
Sedimentary Petrology - MG421P13
Title: Petrologie sedimentárních hornin
Czech title: Petrologie sedimentárních hornin
Guaranteed by: Institute of Geology and Paleontology (31-420)
Faculty: Faculty of Science
Actual: from 2021
Semester: summer
E-Credits: 4
Examination process: summer s.:
Hours per week, examination: summer s.:2/1 C+Ex [hours/week]
Capacity: unlimited
Min. number of students: unlimited
Virtual mobility / capacity: no
State of the course: taught
Language: Czech, English
Note: enabled for web enrollment
the course is taught as cyclical
Guarantor: Mgr. Karel Martínek, Ph.D.
Opinion survey results   Examination dates   Schedule   
Annotation -
Last update: OPLUSTIL (06.05.2002)
Course provides students with advanced techniques and approaches used in the study of sedimentary rocks - siliciclastics, carbonates, evaporites, cherts, ironstones, phosphates and hydrocarbons. Emphasis is given to microstructures, provenance and diagenetic processes. Students will acquire strong skills in recognition of the rock composition, sedimentary structures and microstructures, and they will be able to interpret these data in terms of diagenetic history, fluid flow and small-scale depositional history.

Literature -
Last update: Mgr. Karel Martínek, Ph.D. (25.10.2019)

M.E.Tucker: Sedimentary petrology. Blackwell, 2003.

Pettijohn F.J., Potter P.E. a Siever R. (1987): Sand and Sandstone. Springer-Verlag, New York, 553 pp.

M.E.Tucker&V.P.Wright: Carbonate Sedimentology. Blackwell, 1994.

P.A.Scholle et al. (eds): Carbonate depositional environments. AAPG Memoir 33, 1983.

Bathurst R.G.C. (1979): Carbonate sediments and their diagenesis. Developments in sedimentology 12, Elsevier, Amsterodam.

C.H.Moore (1989): Carbonate diagenesis and Porosity. Developments in sedimentology 46, Elsevier.

Requirements to the exam -
Last update: Mgr. Karel Martínek, Ph.D. (25.10.2019)

scientific paper presentation

course work

test - quiz + essay

Syllabus -
Last update: Ing. Radek Trnka, Ph.D. (20.04.2006)

1. Siliciclastic rocks - grain-size analysis, morphology, modal composition, provenance, heavy minerals, geochronology; diagenesis - compaction, porosity, decompaction, backstripping, authigenesis, cements, diagenetic environments

2. Carbonates I. - mineralogy, specific structures, components, classification

(Folk 1962, Dunham 1962); depositional environmments

3. Carbonates II. - dolomitization, dedolomitization, porosity, early, late and burial diagenesis, cements, diagenetic environments

4. Evaporites, cherts, ironstones, organic matter and hydrocarbons, glauconite, phosphates

5. Geochemistry of sedimentary rocks - stable isotopes, trace elements, chemostratigraphy, eventostratigraphy; cathodoluminiscence; case studies

6. Paleosols - processes, diagnostic features; humid, arid, semiarid; calcretes, silcretes, dolocretes

Course schedule:

12 2-hour or 6 4-hour lectures

practicals include half day field work and 2 3-hour microscopy lab work

Requirements:

credit - oral presentation of selected scientific paper, student project including field and microscopical documentation of outcrop measured section and interpretation of depositional and diaggenetic history from the obtained data

exam: test - knowledge quiz + essay on selected topic

Dependencies:

basic courses in Mineralogy and Petrology (1st year) must be passed; completion of Sedimentary geology course (3rd year, autumn semester) is highly recommended

Aim:

Course provides students with advanced techniques and approaches used in the study of sedimentary rocks - siliciclastics, carbonates, evaporites, cherts, ironstones, phosphates and hydrocarbons. Emphasis is given to microstructures, provenance and diagenetic processes. Students will acquire strong skills in recognition of the rock composition, sedimentary structures and microstructures, and they will be able to interpret these data in terms of diagenetic history, fluid flow and small-scale depositional history.

 
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