The Special Relationship between the United States and Great Britain - JTM259
Title: The Special Relationship between the United States and Great Britain
Guaranteed by: Department of North American Studies (23-KAS)
Faculty: Faculty of Social Sciences
Actual: from 2020
Semester: winter
E-Credits: 6
Examination process: winter s.:combined
Hours per week, examination: winter s.:2/0, Ex [HT]
Capacity: 14 / unknown (10)
Min. number of students: unlimited
4EU+: no
Virtual mobility / capacity: no
State of the course: taught
Language: English
Teaching methods: full-time
Teaching methods: full-time
Note: course can be enrolled in outside the study plan
enabled for web enrollment
priority enrollment if the course is part of the study plan
Guarantor: doc. PhDr. Mgr. Francis Raška, Ph.D.
Teacher(s): doc. PhDr. Mgr. Francis Raška, Ph.D.
Class: Courses for incoming students
Examination dates   WS schedule   Noticeboard   
Annotation -
PURPOSE OF THE COURSE

This M.A. seminar course seeks to encourage students to consider the nature of the relationship between the United States and Great Britain. How has it evolved? What are the prospects for the survival of the “special relationship”? The course is introductory in nature and the readings reflect this fact. All assigned readings will be sent to students electronically

Last update: Raška Francis, doc. PhDr. Mgr., Ph.D. (20.09.2023)
Aim of the course -

PURPOSE OF THE COURSE

 

This M.A. seminar course seeks to encourage students to consider the nature of the relationship between the United States and Great Britain. How has it evolved? What are the prospects for the survival of the “special relationship”? The course is introductory in nature and the readings reflect this fact. All assigned readings will be sent to students electronically.

Last update: Raška Francis, doc. PhDr. Mgr., Ph.D. (20.09.2023)
Course completion requirements -

Each student will be awarded a final mark at the end of the semester, which will be determined by three factors:

                                                           Class participation 30%

                                                           Term paper 50%

                                                           Oral examination 20%

 

Grading is based on the Dean's Measure no. 20/2019: https://fsv.cuni.cz/deans-measure-no-20/2019

  • 91% and more   => A
  • 81-90%             => B
  • 71-80%             => C
  • 61-70%             => D
  • 51-60%             => E
  • 0-50%               => F

 

Last update: Raška Francis, doc. PhDr. Mgr., Ph.D. (20.09.2023)
Literature -

TEXTS

 

Baylis, John, Anglo-American Relations since 1939, Manchester, 1997.

 

Buruma, Ian, The Churchill Complex: The Rise and Fall of the Special Relationship, London, 2020.

 

Smith, Michael. The Real Special Relationship: The True Story of How MI6 and the CIA Work Together, New York, 2023.

 

 

 

 

 

Last update: Raška Francis, doc. PhDr. Mgr., Ph.D. (20.09.2023)
Teaching methods -

Students will be expected to read the assigned materials. Attendance in class sessions and participation in class discussions are required and each student will be required to submit a term paper containing 10 to 15 double-spaced pages at the end of the semester. In order to avoid any problems, I will need to know term paper topics beforehand. During the first weeks of the course, we will agree as a group on the submission dates for the topics and the term papers themselves. If a student repeatedly fails to read the assigned materials and/or does not attend the course regularly, I reserve the right not to accept his/her term paper at the end of the term. This translates into “No work, no credit.” 

 

Last update: Raška Francis, doc. PhDr. Mgr., Ph.D. (20.09.2023)
Syllabus -

The Special Relationship between the United States and Great Britain since the Second World War

 

 Course number: JTM259

 

Instructor: doc. PhDr. Francis D. Raška, PhD.

 

E-mail: francisraska@gmail.com  

 

Office hours: Tuesdays from 3:30 PM until 4:30 PM and Wednesdays from 3:30 PM until 4:30 PM in Room C419

 

            PURPOSE OF THE COURSE

 

This M.A. seminar course seeks to encourage students to consider the nature of the relationship between the United States and Great Britain. How has it evolved? What are the prospects for the survival of the “special relationship”? The course is introductory in nature and the readings reflect this fact. All assigned readings will be sent to students electronically.

                        

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND EVALUATION PROCEDURES

 

Each student will be awarded a final mark at the end of the semester, which will be determined by three factors:

                                                            Class participation 30%

                                                            Term paper 50%

                                                            Oral examination 20%

 

Grading is based on the Dean's Measure no. 20/2019: https://fsv.cuni.cz/deans-measure-no-20/2019

  • 91% and more   => A
  • 81-90%             => B
  • 71-80%             => C
  • 61-70%             => D
  • 51-60%             => E
  • 0-50%               => F

 

 

Students will be expected to read the assigned materials. Attendance in class sessions and participation in class discussions are required and each student will be required to submit a term paper containing 10 to 15 double-spaced pages at the end of the semester. In order to avoid any problems, I will need to know term paper topics beforehand. During the first weeks of the course, we will agree as a group on the submission dates for the topics and the term papers themselves. If a student repeatedly fails to read the assigned materials and/or does not attend the course regularly, I reserve the right not to accept his/her term paper at the end of the term. This translates into “No work, no credit.” Past experience has taught me that, largely on account of other university requirements and responsibilities, students need help with time management and guidance in their work. Therefore, I have decided upon several courses of action. First, I will insist that students let me know how they are getting on with their work throughout the course of the semester. Second, some time will be spent during the first session(s) discussing what is expected in a term paper. Third, all students can expect to be examined orally on the topic of their term paper at the end of the term. Questions asked during individual examination sessions may involve the given term paper topic as well as the research methods employed. The utlilization of others’ ideas must be cited. Failure to cite the words and/or ideas of others constitutes plagiarism. The Faculty of Social Sciences has very severe penalties for plagiarism, including expulsion. I ask each of you to be very careful and make sure that you cite all sources consulted. It is in your interest. Finally, I would like to stress that, in order for the course to be a success, we need to work together as a group of dedicated, mature scholars whose members communicate constructively with one another. Let the festival of learning begin!

 

TEXTS

 

Baylis, John, Anglo-American Relations since 1939, Manchester, 1997.

 

Buruma, Ian, The Churchill Complex: The Rise and Fall of the Special Relationship, London, 2020.

 

Smith, Michael. The Real Special Relationship: The True Story of How MI6 and the CIA Work Together, New York, 2023.

 

COURSE TOPICS AND ASSIGNED READINGS

 

Documentary History of the “Special Relationship”

 

Readings:

 

1.     Baylis, John, Anglo-American Relations since 1939, pp. 18-37.

2.     Baylis, John, Anglo-American Relations since 1939, pp. 38-67.

3.     Baylis, John, Anglo-American Relations since 1939, pp. 68-117.

4.     Baylis, John, Anglo-American Relations since 1939, pp. 118-167.

5.     Baylis, John, Anglo-American Relations since 1939, pp. 168-196.

6.     Baylis, John, Anglo-American Relations since 1939, pp. 197-222.

7.     Baylis, John, Anglo-American Relations since 1939, pp. 223-252.

 

Various Aspects of the “Special Relationship”

 

Readings:

 

8.     Buruma, Ian, The Churchill Complex: The Rise and Fall of the Special Relationship, pp. 37-105.

9.     Buruma, Ian, The Churchill Complex: The Rise and Fall of the Special Relationship, pp. 107-147.

10.  Smith, Michael. The Real Special Relationship: The True Story of How MI6 and the CIA Work Together, pp. 374-422.

11.  Smith, Michael. The Real Special Relationship: The True Story of How MI6 and the CIA Work Together, pp. 423-489.

 

 

Last update: Raška Francis, doc. PhDr. Mgr., Ph.D. (20.09.2023)