SubjectsSubjects(version: 861)
Course, academic year 2019/2020
  
Nations and Nationalism - JSM430
Title: Nations and Nationalism
Czech title: Národy a nacionalismus
Guaranteed by: Department of Sociology (23-KS)
Faculty: Faculty of Social Sciences
Actual: from 2019
Semester: summer
Points: 8
E-Credits: 8
Examination process: summer s.:oral
Hours per week, examination: summer s.:2/0 Ex [hours/week]
Capacity: 35 / unknown (35)
Min. number of students: unlimited
State of the course: taught
Language: English
Teaching methods: full-time
Note: course can be enrolled in outside the study plan
enabled for web enrollment
priority enrollment if the course is part of the study plan
Guarantor: doc. PhDr. Zdeněk Uherek, CSc.
Teacher(s): Shreya Bhardwaj
doc. PhDr. Zdeněk Uherek, CSc.
Annotation -
Last update: doc. Mgr. Martin Hájek, Ph.D. (06.12.2019)
History of the anthropological research of the nationalism (1960s – present). Theory of the Cultural and Ethnic Groups – Anthropological View; changes of the historical meaning of the nation, the tribe and the minority. Ernest Gellner’s theory. Characteristic (and symbols) of the nation, tribe, culture group. Benedict Anderson’s theory. Examples of the nationalists‘ constructions in Europe (Czechs, Slovaks, Poles, Scots); West Europe and USA before 1989 – Reality and Discourse. Examples of the nationalists‘ constructions in post-colonial Africa, Asia and Latin America – Reality and Discourse. Culture groups „without ethnicity“ and culture/ethnic groups in diaspora (Romanies, Jews – Israelies). Nations and ethnic groups in the empires. Great Britain, Eastearn Europe and China – Reality and Discourse. Discourse about the Conflicting Civilisations. Post-communist Countries in 1990s. Ethnic Processes between Chaos and Organised Effort.
Course completion requirements -
Last update: doc. PhDr. Zdeněk Uherek, CSc. (20.05.2020)

Students will attend lectures and seminars, discuss lectured topics and literature, and write and discuss a study on at least four pages (7,200 characters).
The small study will include a brief introduction, a subchapter on the status, methodology, presentation of results and conclusions, and a list of references. If possible, this small study will be discussed in a seminar. The deadline for submitting the study is May 19.

The "mid-term assignment" will be 3 pages (or 1,500 words) in length and will require students to watch the film and analyze it in the light of lectures and literature. The deadline for submitting the medium-term task is 24 April.

The final test will verify the knowledge of individual topics.

The final test will verify the knowledge of individual topics.
Students can earn up to
- 50 points for the study
- 30 points for the test
- 20 points for the mid-term assignment

Classification of students for fulfilled duties is as follows:
Evaluation criteria:

The marking criteria will be based on the following percentage system:

100 - 91: A (excellent, with minor lapses)

81 - 90: B (very good, above-average achievement, with a few mistakes)

71 - 80: C (good, overall good performance with some significant mistakes)

61 - 70: D (satisfactory, acceptable performance with substantial mistakes)

51 - 60: E (sufficient, performance fulfils minimum requirements)

50 - 0: F (failed)

Literature -
Last update: doc. Mgr. Martin Hájek, Ph.D. (03.12.2019)

Literature:

Compulsory:

  • Anderson, B. (2016). Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism . London: Verso.
  • Gellner, E. (1983). Nations and Nationalism . Ithaca, NY: Cornell Univ. Press.
  • Brubaker, R. (2011). Religion and nationalism: Four approaches *. Nations and Nationalism, 18 (1), 2-20. doi: 10.1111 / j.1469-8129.2011.00486.
  • Brubaker, R. (2011). Religion and nationalism: Four approaches *. Nations and Nationalism, 18 (1), 2-20. doi: 10.1111 / j.1469-8129.2011.00486.
  • Holy, L. (nd). Nation against state. The Little Czech and the Great Czech Nation, 16-54. doi: 10.1017 / cbo9780511621727.002

 

 

Recommended:

  • Haas, EB (1986). What is nationalism and why should we study it? International Organization, 40 (03), 707. doi: 10.1017 / s0020818300027326
  • Waldron, AN (1985). Theories of Nationalism and Historical Explanation. World Politics, 37 (03), 416-433. doi: 10.2307 / 2010250
  • Fortes, M. & Evans-Pritchard, EE 1940. Introduction. In: M. Fortes & EE Evans-Pritchard (eds) African Political Systems. London: Oxford University Press: 1-23.
  • Freedman, M., & Barth, F. (1970). Ethnic Groups and Boundaries: Difference. The British Journal of Sociology, 21 (2), 231. doi: 10.2307 / 588416
  • Beyer, P. (nd). Globalization and Glocalization. The Sage Handbook of Sociology of Religion, 98-118. doi: 10.4135 / 9781848607965.n6
  • Wimmer, A. & Schiller, NG (2003). Methodological Nationalism, Social Sciences, and Study of Migration: An Essay in Historical Epistemology. International Migration Review, 37 (3), 576-610. doi: 10.1111 / j.1747-7379.2003.tb00151.
  • Giddens, A. (1991). The consequences of modernity . Cambridge: Polity Press: 63-78
  • Uherek  ,  ZNot only moving bodies  :  conceived  and  transforming concepts  in  migration studies  . Slovak Ethnography. Roč. 65  , No. 2  (  2017  ), s. 222-233
  • Nodia, G. (2016). Nationalism and Democracy. Democracy . doi: 10.7312 / blau17412-094
  • Hansen, TB (1996). Recuperating Masculinity. Critique of Anthropology, 16 (2), 137-172. two: 10.1177 / 0308275x9601600203
  • Wariavwalla, B. (2000) Religion and Nationalism in India Ram The Hindu Nation, 89: 357, 593-605, DOI: 10.1080 / 003585300225223
  • Mukta, P. (1995). The Politics of Religious Nationalism and New Indian Historiography: Lessons for the Indian Diaspora.
  • DeHanas, D. N. & Shterin, M. (2018) Religion and the rise of populism. Religion, State & Society, 46:3, 177-185, DOI: 10.1080/09637494.2018.1502911
  • Eriksen, TH (2006, March 27). Nations in Cyberspace . Lecture presented by Ernest Gellner Lecture, London School of Economics, London.
  • Meinhof, UH (2018). Living (with) borders: East-West borders in Europe . Abingdon, Oxfordshire: Routledge.
  • Lewellen, Ted C. (2003)  Political Anthropology: An Introduction.  3rd ed. Westport, Conn: Praeger.
Syllabus -
Last update: doc. Mgr. Martin Hájek, Ph.D. (03.12.2019)

I. Theories, basic concepts and ideas of nationalism

1. Basic introduction to nationalism

Lit: Thomas Hylland Eriksen (2001) Small Places, Large Issues. London: Pluto Press: 275 - 293.

2. Theory of Cultural and Ethnic Groups; primordialists, modernists,  Ernest Gellner's and Benedict Anderson's theories. Types of nationalism.

Lit: Thomas Hylland Eriksen (2001) Small Places Large Issues. London: Pluto Press: 261-274.

      Benedict Anderson (2006) Imagined Communities. London, New York: Verso. Revised edition: 67-82.

      John Kane (2016) Nationalism. Queensland: School of Government and Relations.

      Chain Gans (2003) The Limits of Nationalism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: 7-22.

3. History of the Anthropological Research of Nationalism, Nations and Nation States, Long-Distance Nationalism

Lit: Rogers Brubaker (2004) Ethnicity Without Groups. Cambridge: Harvard University Press: 132-160

4. Transnationalism and Methodological Nationalism

Lit. Andreas Wimmer; Nina Glick Schiller (2003) Methodological Nationalism, the Social Sciences, and the Study of Migration. IMR 39, 3: 576-610.

 

II. Related concepts: applying theories of nationalism to various segments of society

5. Migration

Lit: Frances Pine: Migration as Hope. Current Anthropology Volume 55, Supplement 9, August 2014

6. Religion

Lit. Brubaker, R. (2011). Religion and nationalism: Four approaches *. Nations and Nationalism, 18 (1), 2-20. doi: 10.1111 / j.1469-8129.2011.00486.

     Wariavwalla, B. (2000) Religion and Nationalism in India Ram The Hindu Nation, 89: 357, 593-605, DOI: 10.1080 / 003585300225223

     DeHanas, D. N. & Shterin, M. (2018) Religion and the rise of populism. Religion, State & Society, 46:3, 177-185, DOI: 10.1080/09637494.2018.1502911

7. Sports

 

III. Case Studies

8. Bosnia and Herzegovina

9. Anthropology of Hope: Poland

10. Community Building (Indonesia, USA)

 

IV. Conclusion

11. Changes of social relations in the intensive globalization era

12. Politics and Forms of Power

 
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