Digitalised Societies: A Socio-Technical Analysis - JSB726
Title: Digitalised Societies: A Socio-Technical Analysis
Guaranteed by: Department of Sociology (23-KS)
Faculty: Faculty of Social Sciences
Actual: from 2022
Semester: summer
E-Credits: 7
Examination process: summer s.:
Hours per week, examination: summer s.:1/1, Ex [HT]
Capacity: 80 / 90 (80)
Min. number of students: unlimited
4EU+: no
Virtual mobility / capacity: no
State of the course: taught
Language: English
Teaching methods: full-time
Teaching methods: full-time
Note: course can be enrolled in outside the study plan
enabled for web enrollment
Guarantor: Mgr. Andrea Hrůzová, Ph.D.
Teacher(s): Mgr. Linda Coufal
Mgr. Andrea Hrůzová, Ph.D.
Mgr. Maksym Kolomoiets
Elisabeth Kovtiak
Magdaléna Michlová
Class: Courses for incoming students
Incompatibility : JSB532
Is incompatible with: JSB532
Is interchangeable with: JSB532
Examination dates   SS schedule   Noticeboard   
Annotation

The course provides an introduction to the sociological understanding of how information and communication technologies shape contemporary societies. The course focuses on social, cultural, political, and economic implications of the diffusion of digital media in late modernity. The lectures provide an overview of the historical development of digital media and discuss various spheres of social life which have been significantly transformed by the presence of digital media: self-presentation, social relationships, political engagement, hate speech, racism, or economy. A focus is given to the politics of social media as well as to the politics through social media. Lectures are accompanied by seminars run in a smaller group of students to allow everyone to engage in discussion through the reflection of reading. The final two weeks of the semester are dedicated to the intense and guided work on a final essay in thematically established groups.

The course has a relationship with the course “Digital Ethnography”. It is highly recommended that students attend the course “Digitalized Societies” FIRST.

Last update: Hrůzová Andrea, Mgr., Ph.D. (31.01.2024)
Aim of the course
Course Objectives
1. Understanding of the ways in which information and communication technologies shape contemporary societies.
2. Development of the knowledge about social, cultural, political and economic implications of the diffusion of digital media in late modernity.
3. Critical examination of one´s own position within the contemporary communication infrastructure.
Last update: Hrůzová Andrea, Mgr., Ph.D. (31.01.2024)
Course completion requirements

Assessment methods

  • mandatory attendance of 80% (will be monitored, acceptance of 3 absences throughout the whole semester) 

  • reading reflection of every single reading: in total 8 reflections - 16 points (2 points per reflection)

    • reading reflection consists of answering the following questions for each text:

      • What is the main information of the text?

      • What have I learned?

      • Which examples from my everyday/professional life can I provide related to the text?

      • Was I missing some information/example/data in the text?

    • late submission of reflection = 0 points 

    • two absent reflections = minus one grade 

    • reading reflection is submitted via Moodle 24 hours before the seminar

    • reading reflection cannot be submitted after the 10th week of the semester

  •  first articulation of the final essay - 10 points

    • submitted in the week no. 11 & 12 via Moodle

    • consists of title, goal(s), short blurb and two references outside the seminar reading (400 words

    • a video tutorial will be shared with students 

    • a template will be shared with students 

  • final essay submission followed by an oral interview based on the essay content - 74 points

    • 1800 words (excluding references)

    • 3 possible formats: theoretical essay, analysis of case study, mini research paper (students are presented to each format at a seminar session)

    • submitted via Moodle in three officially announced deadlines

    • it is necessary to reach 37 points to pass the essay

In the course, there is the ZERO AI USE policy. If there is a suspicion for the use of an AI tool, a material is going through an AI detector tool and there is an oral examination of students regarding the research process and the content of the submitted material.

A - F grading system

91 + = A
81-90 = B
71-80 = C
61-70 = D
51-60 = E
0-50 = F



Last update: Hrůzová Andrea, Mgr., Ph.D. (31.01.2024)
Literature

Compulsory readings for seminars (listed by weeks):

week 2:

Emilie Munch Gregersen et al. 2023. ´Digital dependence: Online fatigue and coping strategies during the COVID-19 lockdown´. Media, Culture & Society. Vol. 45(5) 967–984

Marie Heřmanová. 2022. ´Politicisation of the Domestic: Populist Narratives About Covid‐19 Among Influencers´. Media and Communication. Vol. 10(4) 180–190.

week 4:

Vilem Flusser. 1983/2000. “The Apparatus” (chapter) in Towards the Philosophy of Photography, 21-32.

Mühlhoff, R. (2020). Human-aided artificial intelligence: Or, how to run large computations in human brains? Toward a media sociology of machine learning. New Media & Society, 22(10), 1868-1884.

week 6:

Michelle Gorea. 2021. ´Becoming Your “Authentic” Self: How Social Media Influences Youth’s Visual Transitions´ Social Media + Society,  1–12.

Mitchell Hobbs, Stephen Owen & Livia Gerber. 2017. “Liquid love? Dating apps, sex, relationships and the digital transformation of intimacy”, Journal of Sociology, 52(2), 271-284.

week 8:

Roza Tsagarousianou. 2023. ´The Datafication of Migrant Bodies and the Enactment of Migrant Subjectivities: Biometric Data, Power and Resistance at the Borders of Europe´. Media, Culture & Society. 1-18. (online first)

Ging, Debbie. 2017. ‘Alphas, Betas, and Incels: Theorizing the Masculinities of the Manosphere’. Men and Masculinities 22(4):638–57.

 

Recommended literature:

Barassi, V. (2019). Datafied Citizens in the Age of Coerced Digital Participation. Sociological Research Online, 24(3), 414-429.

Fisher, E. and Fuchs, C. (eds.) 2015. Reconsidering value and labour in the digital age. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Gane, N., & Beer, D. (2008). New media: The key concepts. Oxford: Berg

Kelty, C. (2008). Two Bits: The Cultural Significance of Free Software. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008.

Lupton, Deborah (2013) Digital Sociology. London: Routledge.

Marres, N. (2017). Digital sociology: The reinvention of social research. London: John Wiley & Sons.

Miller, V. (2011). Understanding digital culture. London: SAGE Publications.

Orton-Johnson, K. and N. Prior (Eds) (2013) Critical Perspectives in Digital Sociology, Palgrave MacMillan, Basingstoke.

Last update: Hrůzová Andrea, Mgr., Ph.D. (31.01.2024)
Teaching methods

Teaching methods:  

Frontal lectures accommodate Q & A parts and provoke questions meant to be discussed in seminar groups.

Seminar groups provide the space for reading reflection and open, yet safe collective dabate in a smaller group of students.

One final week is dedicated to making students well prepared for the essay writing.

The course content and homeworks should be available and submitted via the Moodle.

OPTIONAL: Robotic workshop 11. 4. 2024 9.00-11.00 National Technical Library (free attendance)

Last update: Hrůzová Andrea, Mgr., Ph.D. (31.01.2024)
Syllabus

1st week: lecture Digitalized Societies: Course Intro (21. 2.)

  • introduction to the course

  • formal characteristics of the course

  • week by week content 

  • discussion of everyday digital media experience with students

  • lecture delivered by Andrea Pruchova Hruzova

 

2nd week:  seminar reading & discussion (28. 2.)

  • Emilie Munch Gregersen et al. 2023. ´Digital dependence: Online fatigue and coping strategies during the COVID-19 lockdown´. Media, Culture & Society. Vol. 45(5) 967–984

  • Marie Heřmanová. 2022. ´Politicisation of the Domestic: Populist Narratives About Covid‐19 Among Influencers´. Media and Communication. Vol. 10(4) 180–190.

 

3rd week: lecture Theory of New Media (6. 3.)

  • How old are the new media? Convergent culture (H. Jenkins)

  • The power of Apparatus (V. Flusser)

  • Principles of new media (L. Manovich) 

  • Algorithm as living subject (P. Brey) 

  • Geology of new media (J. Parikka) 

  • lecture delivered by Andrea Průchová Hrůzová

 

4th week: seminar reading & discussion (13. 3.)

  •  Vilem Flusser. 1983/2000. “The Apparatus” (chapter) in Towards the Philosophy of Photography, 21-32- submission of reading reflection

  • Mühlhoff, R. (2020). Human-aided artificial intelligence: Or, how to run large computations in human brains? Toward a media sociology of machine learning. New Media & Society, 22(10), 1868-1884

 

5th week: lecture Identity, Online Environment and Social Networks (20. 3.)

  • impression management

  • instagramism

  • culture of selfie

  • affective turn & affective communication

  • lecture delivered by Andrea Průchová Hrůzová

 

6th week: seminar reading & discussion (27. 3.)

  • Michelle Gorea. 2021. ´Becoming Your “Authentic” Self: How Social Media Influences Youth’s Visual Transitions´ Social Media + Society,  1–12.

  • Mitchell Hobbs, Stephen Owen & Livia Gerber. 2017. “Liquid love? Dating apps, sex, relationships and the digital transformation of intimacy”, Journal of Sociology, 52(2), 271-284 - submission of reading reflection

 

7th week: lecture Political Movements, Xenorasism & Polarization (3. 4.)

  • digital born movements 

  • practices of othering in the online realm

  • hate as an online mobilizing instrument

  • misogyny as an online practice

  • lecture delivered by Linda Coufal & Andrea Průchová Hrůzová

 

8th week: seminar reading & discussion (10. 4.) & How to Write a Good Academic Essay?

  • Roza Tsagarousianou. 2023. ´The Datafication of Migrant Bodies and the Enactment of Migrant Subjectivities: Biometric Data, Power and Resistance at the Borders of Europe´. Media, Culture & Society. 1-18. (online first)

  • Ging, Debbie. 2017. ‘Alphas, Betas, and Incels: Theorizing the Masculinities of the Manosphere’. Men and Masculinities 22(4):638–57. doi: 10.1177/1097184X17706401.

 

OPTIONAL 11. 4. Robotic Workshop in National Technical Library (9.00-11.00)

 

9th week: guest lecture by Martin Tremčinský “(Hidden) Labour in Digital Capitalism”  (17. 4.) 

  • watch the video essay “Cycles of Labour: In Metaverse, We All Will Be Housewives”

 

10th week: lecture & discussion Digital Economy (24. 4.)

  • lecture delivered by Maksym Kolomoiets

  • history of online markets

  • developed business models in the modern platform economy

  • platform ecosystems

  • the embeddedness of platforms limits their innovativeness

  • discussion

 

11th week: 1. 5. National Holiday (essay draft submission)

 

12th week: 8. 5. National Holiday (essay draft submission)

 

13th week: seminar consultations of essays (15. 5.)

  • students are meeting in newly established groups based on the choice of the essay´s theme

  • before the consultation: each student submits the title and the goal(s) of the essay & two academic references out of the seminar reading list

Last update: Hrůzová Andrea, Mgr., Ph.D. (31.01.2024)