SubjectsSubjects(version: 867)
Course, academic year 2019/2020
  
Introduction to Visual Sociology - JSB534
Title: Introduction to Visual Sociology
Guaranteed by: Department of Sociology (23-KS)
Faculty: Faculty of Social Sciences
Actual: from 2019
Semester: winter
Points: 7
E-Credits: 7
Examination process: winter s.:
Hours per week, examination: winter s.:1/1 Ex [hours/week]
Capacity: 27 / 27 (20)
Min. number of students: unlimited
State of the course: taught
Language: English
Teaching methods: full-time
Note: course can be enrolled in outside the study plan
enabled for web enrollment
priority enrollment if the course is part of the study plan
Guarantor: Ludmila Maria Wladyniak, M.A., Ph.D.
Teacher(s): Ludmila Maria Wladyniak, M.A., Ph.D.
P//Is pre-requisite for: JSM581
Annotation - Czech
Last update: Ludmila Maria Wladyniak, M.A., Ph.D. (17.09.2019)
The course is an introduction to visual sociology and visual studies. It gives students the opportunity to get to know the basics of visual sociology, both in theory and practice. The course is designed not only to present theoretical approach and methodological background of the subdiscipline, but also to give students the opportunity to explore the filed themselves and gain some research practice. The course is completed by in-class workshops and students’ own projects.
Aim of the course
Last update: Ludmila Maria Wladyniak, M.A., Ph.D. (17.09.2019)

 Objectives:

·         to present the basic assumptions and main currents of the subdiscipline

·         to help to understand the visual culture – offline and online

·         to let students explore the field themselves

·         to involve students into the practical exercises and activities

·         to show the usability of sociological approach outside the academic environment

Course completion requirements
Last update: Ludmila Maria Wladyniak, M.A., Ph.D. (17.09.2019)

Requirements & assessment:

·         active participation in classes – 40% 

·         project – 60%

·         attendance - students may skip one class (no excuse needed)

 

Grading:

91 - 100 points: A - excellent (outstanding performance with only minor mistakes)
81 -  90 points: B - very good (above average performance with some mistakes)
71 - 80 points: C - good (overall good performance with a number of notable mistakes)
61 - 70 points: D - satisfactory (acceptable performance with significant mistakes)
51 - 60 points: E - sufficient (performance fulfils only minimum criteria)
less than 51 points: F - insufficient/failed (more effort needs to be made)

 

Literature
Last update: doc. PhDr. Dino Numerato, Ph.D. (29.10.2019)

Marcus Banks (2001) Reading pictures, in: ‘Visual methods in social research’. London, Thousand Oaks, New Delhi: SAGE publications, p. 1-9.

John Grady (2001) Becoming a Visual Sociologist. Sociological Imagination, no 1/2, vol. 38, p. 83-106.

Susan Sontag (2005) ‘On Photography’. New York: Rosetta Books, p. 1-20.

Susan Sontag (2005) ‘On Photography’. New York: Rosetta Books p. 119-141.

Kari Andén-Papadopoulos (2008) The Abu Ghraib torture photographs: News frames, visual culture, and the power of images. Journalism, 9; 5-30.

Judith Butler (2009) Torture and the Ethics of Photography: Thinking with Sontag, in: ‘Frames of War’. New York: Verso, p. 63-101.

Erving Goffman (1986) Gender commercials, in: ‘Gender Advertisement’. New York: Harper Torchbooks, p. 24-27.

Paul Frosh (2001) The Public Eye and the Citizen-Voyeur: Photography as Performance of Power, Social Semiotics, Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 43-59.

Steven J. Gold (2004) Using Photography in Studies of Immigrant Communities, American Behavioral Scientist, Vol. 47, No. 12, pp. 1551-1572.

Pierre Bourdieu (1990) Photography. A Middle-brow Art. Cambridge: Polity Press, p. 13-46.

Thereza M. Senft and Nancy K. Baym (2015) What does the selfie say? Investigating the global phenomenon, ‘International Journal of Communication’, 9(2015), Feature 1588–1606.

Marcus Banks (2001) “Making images”, in: “Visual methods in social research”, SAGE publications, p. 111-132.

Douglas Harper (2012) The visual sociology of space from above, inside and around, in ‘Visual Sociology’, London and New York: Routledge, p. 56-88.

Douglas Harper (2012) Photo elicitation, in ‘Visual Sociology’, London and New York: Routledge, p. 155-188.

Clark-Ibánez, Marisol (2004) Framing the Social World With Photo-Elicitation Interviews. American Behavioral Scientist, Vol. 47, No. 12, pp. 1507-1527.

Douglas Harper (2012) Ethnomethodology, semiotics and the subjective, in ‘Visual Sociology’, London and New York: Routledge, p. 111-141.

Marcus Banks (2001) Presenting research results, in: ‘Visual methods in social research’. London, Thousand Oaks, New Delhi: SAGE publications, p. 139-175.

Syllabus
Last update: Ludmila Maria Wladyniak, M.A., Ph.D. (10.10.2019)

1.     Introduction to the course

2.      Reading pictures

3.     Workshop 

4.     Presentation of the workshop results

5.     Final project discussion

6.     Contemporary visual culture

7.     War photography

8.     Final project update

9.      Visual Research Methods (VRM)

10.  Presentation of students’ projects

11. Analysis of visual material – in-class workshop in groups

 

 

 
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