SubjectsSubjects(version: 867)
Course, academic year 2019/2020
  
Digital Sociology - JSB532
Title: Digital Sociology
Guaranteed by: Department of Sociology (23-KS)
Faculty: Faculty of Social Sciences
Actual: from 2019
Semester: summer
Points: 7
E-Credits: 7
Examination process: summer s.:
Hours per week, examination: summer s.:1/1 Ex [hours/week]
Capacity: 55 / 80 (40)
Min. number of students: unlimited
State of the course: taught
Language: English
Teaching methods: full-time
Additional information: https://dl1.cuni.cz/course/view.php?id=5150
Note: course can be enrolled in outside the study plan
enabled for web enrollment
Guarantor: doc. PhDr. Dino Numerato, Ph.D.
Teacher(s): doc. PhDr. Dino Numerato, Ph.D.
Julien Wacquez
Pre-requisite : JSB008
Annotation -
Last update: doc. PhDr. Dino Numerato, Ph.D. (23.02.2020)
The course will provide an introduction to the sociological understanding of how information and communication technologies shape contemporary societies. The course will focus on the social, cultural, political and economic implications of the diffusion of digital media in late modernity. The first lectures will provide an overview of the historical development of digital media and will present the main theories of digital media in contemporary societies. A focus will be given to the politics of social media as well as to the politics through social media. Particular attention will be given to the relationship between digital media social stratification, identity, body, politics, health, labour and the digital economy. Last but not the last, attention is given to the material aspects of digital infrastructures, related to the functioning of digitalized societies and interconnected invisible environmental externalities.

Course completion requirements
Last update: doc. PhDr. Dino Numerato, Ph.D. (14.02.2020)

Type of Completion: Exam (Zk) (based on assessment methods) 

Assessment methods: 

1) presentation - (15 minutes long) - 8 points max 

2) assignments for seminars (5 compulsory texts related commentary and one sociological reflection of online experiences - 12 points in total max (2 points max for each) 

3) final test (A, B, C, D - one choice) - based on lectures and compulsory literature - 18 points

4) final essay outline - 6 points max 

5) final essay (around 2000 words long (+-10%)) - 56 points max 

IMPORTANT: To pass the Final Exam, the essay has to be evaluated with at least 29 points.

(The final essay has to include references to at least three academic articles on digital cultures not listed among compulsory readings)

 The tasks will be specified based on the number of students enrolled in the course during the registration period.

  

Grading System 

91 - 100 points: A

81 -  90 points: B

71 - 80 points: C

61 - 70 points: D

51 - 60 points: E

less than 51 points: F

 

Literature
Last update: doc. PhDr. Dino Numerato, Ph.D. (21.02.2020)

Compulsory readings

 

Seminar 1

Hogan, B. (2010) The presentation of self in the age of social media: distinguishing performances and exhibitions online. Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society, 30(6), 377-386.

Jamieson, L. (2013) Personal Relationships, Intimacy and the Self in a Mediated and Global Digital Age. In Digital Sociology (pp. 13–33). Ed. By K. Orton-Johnson & N. Prior.  Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Seminar 2

Fuchs, C. (2015). Social media surveillance. In Handbook of digital politics, Ed. by S. Coleman and D. Freelon, (pp. 395-414). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Pybus, J., Coté, M., & Blanke, T. (2015). Hacking the social life of Big Data. Big Data & Society, 2(2): 26-33.

 

Seminar 3

Lupton, D. (2013). The digitally engaged patient: Self-monitoring and self-care in the digital health era. Social Theory & Health, 11(3): 256–270. 

Levy, K.E.C. (2015). The Contexts of Control: Information, Power, and Truck Driving Work. The Information Society 31(2):160-174.

 

Seminar 4

Sunstein, C.R. (2017) #Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media. Princeton: Princeton University Press. (a selected chapter)

Van Dijk, J. A. (2013) Inequalities in the Network Society. In Digital Sociology: Critical Perspectives (pp. 105–124). Ed. By K. Orton-Johnson & N. Prior.  Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

Seminar 5

Latour, B. (2007) Can We Get Our Materialism Back, Please? ISIS. A Journal of the History of Science Society, 98 (1): 138-142.

Halloy, J. (2018) "Sustainability of Living Machines", in Prescott, T. J., Lepora, N. & Verschure, P.F.M.J., (Eds.), Living Machines, Oxford, Oxford University Press, pp. 610-618.

 

Seminar 6 / Final essay

The final essay has to include references to at least three academic articles on digital cultures not listed among compulsory readings and based on individual literature search.

 

Recommended literature

 

Barassi, V. (2019). Datafied Citizens in the Age of Coerced Digital Participation. Sociological Research Online, 24(3), 414-429.

Fisher, E. and Fuchs, C. (eds.) 2015. Reconsidering value and labour in the digital age. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Gane, N., & Beer, D. (2008). New media: The key concepts. Oxford: Berg

Kelty, C. (2008). Two Bits: The Cultural Significance of Free Software. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008.

Lupton, Deborah (2013) Digital Sociology. London: Routledge.

Miller, V. (2011). Understanding digital culture. London: SAGE Publications.

Orton-Johnson, K. and N. Prior (Eds) (2013) Critical Perspectives in Digital Sociology, Palgrave MacMillan, Basingstoke.

Syllabus
Last update: doc. PhDr. Dino Numerato, Ph.D. (23.02.2020)

Course description

The course will provide an introduction to the sociological understanding of how information and communication technologies shape contemporary societies. The course will focus on social, cultural, political and economic implications of the diffusion of digital media in late modernity. The first lectures will provide an overview of the historical development of digital media and will present the main theories of digital media in contemporary societies. A focus will be given to the politics of social media as well as to the politics through social media. Particular attention will be given to the relationship between digital media and knowledge economy, social stratification, identity, body, politics, healthcare, privacy and digital crime.

Course credits: 7 ECTS 

Type of Completion: Exam (Zk) (based on assessment methods) 

Assessment methods: 

1) presentation - (15 minutes long) - 8 points max 

2) assignments for seminars (5 compulsory texts related commentary and one sociological reflection of online experiences - 12 points in total max (2 points max for each) 

3) final test (A, B, C, D - one choice) - based on lectures and compulsory literature - 18 points

4) final essay outline - 6 points max 

5) final essay (around 2000 words long (+-10%)) - 56 points max 

IMPORTANT: To pass the Final Exam, the essay has to be evaluated with at least 29 points.

(The final essay has to include references to at least three academic articles on digital cultures not listed among compulsory readings)

 The tasks will be specified based on the number of students enrolled in the course during the registration period.

  

Grading System 

91 - 100 points: A

81 -  90 points: B

71 - 80 points: C

61 - 70 points: D

51 - 60 points: E

less than 51 points: F

Teaching methods: Lectures and seminars 

Participation in seminars is compulsory. Only one absence is tolerated. 

 

Timetable

 

Lectures and seminars: Room J 3015, Wednesday 12,30 - 13,50 

Please note that in case of a higher number of students, two seminar groups can be opened.                         

 

More details are available on Moodle: https://dl1.cuni.cz/course/view.php?id=5150 (The syllabus will be finalized by 21 February 2020)

 

Week 1: Lecture 1: Course introduction, Identities and digital cultures in everyday life (19 February) 

Week 2: Seminar 1: Identities and digital cultures in everyday life (26 February) 

Hogan, B. (2010) The presentation of self in the age of social media: distinguishing performances and exhibitions online. Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society, 30(6), 377-386.

Jamieson, L. (2013) Personal Relationships, Intimacy and the Self in a Mediated and Global Digital Age. In Digital Sociology (pp. 13–33). Ed. By K. Orton-Johnson & N. Prior.  Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Week 3: Lecture 2: Making sense of Big Data (4 March) 

Week 4: Seminar 2: Making sense of Big Data (11 March)

Fuchs, C. (2015). Social media surveillance. In Handbook of digital politics, Ed. by S. Coleman and D. Freelon, (pp. 395-414). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Pybus, J., Coté, M., & Blanke, T. (2015). Hacking the social life of Big Data. Big Data & Society, 2(2): 26-33.

Week 5: Lecture 3: Digital Health (18 March)

Week 6: Seminar 3: Digital Health (25 March)

Lupton, D. (2013). The digitally engaged patient: Self-monitoring and self-care in the digital health era. Social Theory & Health, 11(3): 256–270. 

Levy, K.E.C. (2015). The Contexts of Control: Information, Power, and Truck Driving Work. The Information Society 31(2):160-174.

Week 7: Lecture 4: Political Participation Online (1 April)

Week 8: Seminar 4: Political Participation Online  (8 April)

Sunstein, C.R. (2017) #Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media. Princeton: Princeton University Press. (a selected chapter)

Van Dijk, J. A. (2013) Inequalities in the Network Society. In Digital Sociology: Critical Perspectives (pp. 105–124). Ed. By K. Orton-Johnson & N. Prior.  Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Week 9: Lecture 5: The materiality of digital infrastructure (15 April): a lecture given by Julien Wacquez (EHESS Paris/CEFRES Prague)

Week 10: Seminar 5: The materiality of digital infrastructure (22 April)

 

Halloy, J. (2018) "Sustainability of Living Machines", in Prescott, T. J., Lepora, N. & Verschure, P.F.M.J., (Eds.), Living Machines, Oxford, Oxford University Press, pp. 610-618.

Latour, B. (2007) Can We Get Our Materialism Back, Please? ISIS. A Journal of the History of Science Society, 98 (1): 138-142.

Week 11: Seminar 6 (29 April):  Relating experience and theory: A Digital Diet/AppUsageReflection;

Week 12: Rector’s Day (6 May): home preparation: final essays outlines

Week 13: Course Wrap Up (13 May): final test, discussing Final Essay Outlines

  

  

Recommended readings

Fisher, E. and Fuchs, C. (eds.) 2015. Reconsidering value and labour in the digital age. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Gane, N., & Beer, D. (2008). New media: The key concepts. Oxford: Berg

Kelty, C. (2008). Two Bits: The Cultural Significance of Free Software. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008.

Lupton, Deborah (2013) Digital Sociology. London: Routledge.

Miller, V. (2011). Understanding digital culture. London: SAGE Publications.

Orton-Johnson, K. and N. Prior (Eds) (2013) Critical Perspectives in Digital Sociology, Palgrave MacMillan, Basingstoke.

 

 

 
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