SubjectsSubjects(version: 867)
Course, academic year 2019/2020
  
Sociology of Sport - JSB516
Title: Sociology of Sport
Czech title: Sociologie sportu
Guaranteed by: Department of Sociology (23-KS)
Faculty: Faculty of Social Sciences
Actual: from 2019 to 2019
Semester: summer
Points: 7
E-Credits: 7
Examination process: summer s.:combined
Hours per week, examination: summer s.:1/1 Ex [hours/week]
Capacity: unlimited / unlimited (unknown)
Min. number of students: unlimited
State of the course: taught
Language: English
Teaching methods: full-time
Additional information: http://dl1.cuni.cz/enrol/index.php?id=4504
Note: course can be enrolled in outside the study plan
enabled for web enrollment
Guarantor: doc. PhDr. Dino Numerato, Ph.D.
Teacher(s): José Hildo De Oliveira Filho, M.Sc.
doc. PhDr. Dino Numerato, Ph.D.
Incompatibility : JSB528, JSM009
Pre-requisite : JSB008
N//Is incompatible with: JSM009, JSB528
Annotation
Last update: doc. PhDr. Dino Numerato, Ph.D. (29.01.2020)
This course provides an introduction to the sociology of sport. The social sphere of sport is approached as a "serious" and sociologically relevant social sphere that cannot be equated only with fun and leisure. The main objective of this course, divided equally into lectures and seminars, is to equip students with basic conceptual and heuristic tools to carry out a critical and theoretically informed scrutiny of sport-related topics. The course focuses on major historical developments of the sub-discipline of the sociology of sport, provides students with an overview of key scholars in the field, reviews main theoretical concepts and outlines the links between sports sociology and general sociological theory. Particular attention is given to the relationship between sports and politics, mass media, identity, globalisation, civil society, and social stratification.
Literature
Last update: doc. PhDr. Dino Numerato, Ph.D. (29.01.2020)

For compulsory readings, please see the syllabus of the course. 

Requirements to the exam
Last update: doc. PhDr. Dino Numerato, Ph.D. (29.01.2020)

Assessment methods: 

1) presentation - teamwork (10-15 minutes long) – 8 points max 

2) assignments for seminars (5 compulsory texts-related commentaries, to be uploaded on Friday the latest in the week before seminars) – 10 points max (2 points max for each) 

3) final test (A, B, C, D - one choice) - based on lectures and compulsory literature – 18 points

4) final essay outline - 8 points max 

5) final essay (around 1800 words long, (+-10%)) – 56 points max

The tasks will be specified based on the number of students enrolled in the course during the registration period.

 

IMPORTANT: To pass the Final Exam, the essay has to be evaluated with at least 29 points. Furthermore, all assignments have to be submitted and accepted.

The final essay has to include references to at least three academic articles on sport not listed among compulsory readings.

 

Syllabus
Last update: doc. PhDr. Dino Numerato, Ph.D. (29.01.2020)

Details and relevant materials are available on Moodle:

https://dl1.cuni.cz/course/view.php?id=4504 (the syllabus will be finalized by 17 February 2020)

Course description

This course provides an introduction to the sociology of sport. The social sphere of sport is approached as a "serious" and sociologically relevant social sphere that cannot be equated only with fun and leisure. The main objective of this course, divided equally into lectures and seminars, is to equip students with basic conceptual and heuristic tools to carry out a critical and theoretically informed scrutiny of sport-related topics. The course focuses on major historical developments of the sub-discipline of the sociology of sport, provides students with an overview of key scholars in the field, reviews main theoretical concepts and outlines the links between sports sociology and general sociological theory. Particular attention is given to the relationship between sports and politics, mass media, identity, globalisation, civil society, and social stratification.

Course credits: 7 ECTS 

Type of Completion: Exam (Zk) (based on assessment methods) 

Assessment methods: 

1) presentation - teamwork (15 minutes long) – 8 points max 

2) assignments for seminars (5 compulsory texts-related commentaries, to be uploaded on Friday the latest in the week before seminars) – 10 points max (2 points max for each) 

3) final test (A, B, C, D - one choice) - based on lectures and compulsory literature – 18 points

4) final essay outline - 8 points max 

5) final essay (around 1800 words long, (+-10%)) – 56 points max

The tasks will be specified based on the number of students enrolled in the course during the registration period.

 

IMPORTANT: To pass the Final Exam, the essay has to be evaluated with at least 29 points. Furthermore, all assignments have to be submitted and accepted.

The final essay has to include references to at least three academic articles on sport not listed among compulsory readings.

 

Grading System 

91 - 100 points: A - excellent (outstanding performance with only minor mistakes)
81 -  90 points: B - very good (above average performance with some mistakes)
71 - 80 points: C - good (overall good performance with a number of notable mistakes)
61 - 70 points: D - satisfactory (acceptable performance with significant mistakes)
51 - 60 points: E - sufficient (performance fulfils only minimum criteria)
less than 51 points: F - insufficient/failed (more effort needs to be made)
 
Teaching methods: Lectures and seminars (lectures given by Dino Numerato and seminars lead by José Hildo De Oliveira Filho).

Participation in seminars is compulsory. Only one absence is tolerated. 

Timetable
Lectures: Monday 14.00 - 15.20 (J2080) 
 
 
Week 1 (17 February): Lecture 1: Course introduction, Main theoretical approaches and conceptual frameworks 
This introductory lecture will provide a brief overview of the course. The utility of sociological perspective for the understanding of contemporary sport will be demonstrated on several timely examples. This lecture will discuss the first academic reflections of leisure and modern sport and the origins of the sociology of sport as a sociological sub-discipline. This lecture will provide an overview of main sociological theories used to understand the contemporary sport and its developments, in particular, the theories as follows: functionalist theory, conflict theory, interpretative sociology, figurational theory, Marxism and neo-Marxism, cultural studies, feminist theory, post-structuralism and postcolonial theories.
 
Week 2 (24 February): Seminar 1

Discussing literature and assignments, presentations 

Compulsory reading 1 and 2

Donnelly, P. (2003). Sport and Social Theory. In B. Houlihan (Ed.), In Sport and Society: A Student Introduction (pp. 11‐27). London: Sage.
Guttmann, A. (2000). The Development of Modern Sports. In J. J. Coakley & E. Dunning (Eds.), Handbook of Sports Studies (pp. 248‐259). London: Sage.

Week 3 (2 March): Lecture 2: Sport and Social Divisions 

This lecture will be focused on the role of sport as both a mirror and a vehicle of broader processes of social stratification. The role of sport as a vehicle of both social inclusion and social exclusion will be discussed. Particular attention will be given to Bourdieu's concept of the social field of sport and the role of economic and cultural capital. This lecture will also be focused on the construction and reproduction of social identities through sport and physical activities. Particular attention will be given to gender, race and ethnic identities as well as to disability. 

Week 4 (9 March): Seminar 2

Discussing literature and assignments, presentations 

Compulsory reading 3 and 4
 
Collins, M. (2003). Social Exclusion from Sport and Leisure.  In B. Houlihan (Ed.), In Sport and Society: A Student Introduction (pp. 67‐89). London: Sage.
Pfister, G. (2010). Women in sport – gender relations and future perspectives, Sport in Society, 13(2), 234-248.
 
Week 5 (16 March) Lecture 3: Communities, civil society and subcultures 
 
This lecture will discuss the importance of sport for local communities and for the creation of the so-called social capital. This lecture will be focused on the discussion of sport subcultures. Firstly, the early research and its focus on deviance will be discussed. Afterwards, the cultural shift in the studies of subcultures will be explained. The countercultural nature of subcultures and their struggle for authenticity will be reflected upon.
 
Week 6 (23 March): Seminar 3
Discussing literature and assignments, presentations
 
Compulsory reading 5 and 6

Nicholson, M. & Hoye, R. (2008). Sport and Social Capital: An introduction. In Sport and Social Capital, edited by Nicholson, M. & Hoye, R., pp. 1-18. London: Butterworth Heinemann.

Wheaton, B. & Beal, B. (2003). ‘KEEPING IT REAL’ Subcultural Media and the Discourses of Authenticity in Alternative Sport. International Review for the Sociology of Sport, 38(2): 155–176.

  
Week 7 (30 March): Lecture 5:  Sport and globalisation

This lecture will present the development of sport in the global context. Globalisation in relation to sport will be understood both as a process and as an outcome. Technological, social, economic, media and ideological aspects of globalisation will be discussed. Moreover, particular attention will be given to alter-globalisation initiatives in and through sport.

Week 8 (6 April): Seminar 4
Discussing literature and assignments, presentations 
 
Compulsory reading 7 and 8
 
Ivester, S. (2017) Removal, resistance and the right to the Olympic city: The case of Vila Autodromo in Rio de Janeiro. Journal of Urban Affairs, 39(7): 970-985.
Harvey, J., Horne, J. and Safai, P. (2009) Alterglobalization, Global Social Movements, and the Possibility of Political Transformation Through Sport. Sociology of Sport Journal, 26(3): 383-403.
 
Week 9 (13 April): Easter / Bank Holiday
 
Week 10 (20 April): Lecture 5: Sport for Development and Peace 
A guest lecture, given by Eva Válková. 
 
Week 11 (27 April): Seminar 5
Discussing literature and assignments, presentations 
 
Compulsory reading 9 and 10
 
Darnell, S. C., Chawansky, M., Marchesseault, D., Holmes, M., & Hayhurst, L. (2018). The state of play: Critical sociological insights into recent ‘sport for development and peace’research. International review for the sociology of sport, 53(2), 133-151.
Tiessen, R. (2011). Global Subjects or Objects of Globalisation? The promotion of global citizenship in organisations offering sport for development and/or peace programmes. Third World Quarterly, 32(3): 571‐587.
 
Week 12 (4 May): Lecture 6: Sport, Political Economy and Mass Media
This lecture will be focused on the interconnection between sport, mass media, sponsorship and business interests in the global context. Particular attention will be given to commercialisation and commodification of sport in the neoliberal context. This lecture will also be focused on the relationship between sport and mass media. Particular attention will be given to the role of the mass media in the construction of sport heroes and celebrities.
 
Week 13 (11 May): Seminar 6
Discussing literature and assignments, presentations 
Discussing outlines and ideas for the final essay, recommendations for the final essay.
 
Compulsory reading 11 and 12
Scherer, J., & Jackson, S. J. (2008). Cultural Studies and the Circuit of Culture: Advertising, Promotional Culture and the New Zealand All Blacks. Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies, 8(4), 507-526.
Smart, B. (2005). Heroism, Fame and Celebrity in the World of Sport. In B. Smart, The Sport Star (pp. 1‐19), London: Sage. 
 
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