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Course, academic year 2019/2020
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Post-Soviet Central Eurasia - JMM703
Title in English: Post-Soviet Central Eurasia
Guaranteed by: Department of Russian and East European Studies (23-KRVS)
Faculty: Faculty of Social Sciences
Actual: from 2017
Semester: winter
Points: 6
E-Credits: 6
Examination process: winter s.:combined
Hours per week, examination: winter s.:1/1 Ex [hours/week]
Capacity: 15 / unknown (15)
Min. number of students: unlimited
State of the course: taught
Language: English
Teaching methods: full-time
Note: course can be enrolled in outside the study plan
enabled for web enrollment
priority enrollment if the course is part of the study plan
Guarantor: PhDr. Jan Šír, Ph.D.
PhDr. Václav Lídl
Teacher(s): PhDr. Václav Lídl
Incompatibility : JMM361
Annotation
Last update: PhDr. Václav Lídl (15.09.2017)
The course “Post-Soviet Central Eurasia” seeks to give students a solid understanding of the nation-building processes that took place in the Central Eurasian region since the fall of the Soviet Union. The nation-building process consists of three interrelated parts – creation of national identity and ideology; construction of communication, economic and transport infrastructure that binds the nation together; establishing of state apparatus and political system that enables exercise of power over the state. Therefore, the three modules of this course would be based on these phases of the state-building process. Students will be able to comprehend key issues in Central Asian internal politics.
Literature
Last update: PhDr. Václav Lídl (29.11.2018)

Environment

Space in Central Asia: Geography, Geopolitics, Geostrategy.

Graham E. Fuller and Frederick S. Starr, The Xinjiang Problem (Washington: Central Asia and Caucasus Institute, 2014): 4-33. (Reader)

Neil Megoran, "Revisiting the Pivot: The Influence of Halford Mackinder on Analysis of Uzbekistan's International Relations," The Geographical Journal 170 (2004): 347-358. (Reader)

Short presentation readings:

Mackinder, Halford. "The Geographical Pivot of History."The Geographical Journal Vol. 23, No. 4 (1904), 298-321. (Reader)

Zbigniew Brzezinski, The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives. (London: Basic Books, 1998): 123-151. (Reader) Lavengood

 

Time in Central Asia: Implications of Central Asia's History for the Present.

Svat Soucek, A History of Inner Asia (Cambridge: CUPress, 2000), 195-263. (Reader)

Leah Sherwood, "Small states' Strategic Hedging for Security and Influence." Trends Research and Advisory, trendsinstitution.org/small-states-strategic-hedging-for-security-and-influence.

Alexander Cooley, Great games, Local Rulers: The New Power Contest in Central Asia. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012): 121-130.

Short presentation readings:

Frederick S. Starr ed., Ferghana Valley: The Heart of Central Asia (New York: M. E. Sharp, 2011), 232-278. (Reader) Nováková

Gilles Dorronsoro, Revolution Unending: Afghanistan, 1979 to the Present, (New York: Columbia University Press, 2005): 235-315. (Reader)

 

Powers in Central Asia: Dis-integration, Integration and Great-Powers.

Frederick S. Starr ed., Putin's Grand Strategy: The Eurasian Union and Its Discontents (Washington: Central Asia and Caucasus Institute, 2014).

Short Presentation Readings:

Aris, Stephen. "The Shanghai Cooperation Organisation: Tackling the Three Evils. A Regional Response to Non-Traditional Security Challenges or an Anti-Western Block." Europe-Asia Studies Vol. 61, No. 3 (2009). Godec

Dragneva, Rilka and Kataryna Wolczuk. "Eurasia Economic Integration: Institutions, Promises and Faultlines."in: The Geopolitics of Eurasian Economic Union. (London: London School of Economics, 2014).

 

Screening of the film "In the Shadow of the Holy Book" (Šír)

 

Identity

Role of Political Islam in Modern Central Asia.

Vitaly V. Naumkin, Radical Islam in Central Asia: Between Pen and Rifle. (New York: Rowan and Littlefield, 2005). (Reader) 

Emmanuel Karagiannis, Political Islam in Central Asia: The Challenge of Hizb-ut Tahrir. New York: Routledge, 2011. (Reader)

Adeeb Khalid, Islam after Communism: Religion and Politics in Central Asia. (Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2007), 116-192. (Reader) 

Victoria Clement, "Articulating National Identity in Turkmenistan: Inventing Tradition through Myth, Cult and Language," Nations & Nationalism, July 2014, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 546-562. (Reader) 

Short presentation readings:

Shirin Akiner, Violence in Andijan, 13 May 2005: An Independent Assessment. (Uppsala: Central Asia-Caucasus Institute and Silk Road Studies Programme, 2005), 1-53. (Reader) Najmin Kamilsoy

Johan Rasanayagam, Islam in Post-Soviet Uzbekistan: The Morality of Experience. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011), 65-121. (Reader) Bellafronte Emma

 

Infrastructure

Great Game for Central Asia's Energy Resources.

Annette Bohr, Turkmenistan: Power, Politics and Petro-Authoritarianism (London: Chatham House – Russia and Eurasia Programme, 2016). (Reader)

Martha Brill Olcott, Turkmenistan: Real Energy Giant or Eternal Potential? (Cambridge: Harvard Kennedy School, 2013). (Reader)

Bertil Nygren, "Putin's Use of Natural Gas to Reintegrate the CIS Region,"Problems of Post-Communism, Vol. 55, No. 4 (2008). (Reader)

Short presentation readings:

Vladimir Fedorenko, The New Silk Road Initiatives in Central Asia (Washington D.C.: Rethink Institute, 2013). (Reader) Putensen

Gilbert Rozman, "The Intersection of Russia's Turn to the East and China's March to the West," Russian analytical digest No. 169 (2015). (Reader)

 

Institutions

Informal Institutions: Clans, Tribes and Nations. (Koutník)

Kathleen Collins, Clan Politics and Regime Transition in Central Asia. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), 23-32. (Reader)

Mohira Sayarkulova, "Reluctant Sovereigns? Central Asian States' Path to Independence," In: Sovereignty After Empire. Comparing the Middle East and Central Asia. (Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 2011), 127-153. (Ebrary)

Frederick S. Starr, Clans, Authoritarian Rulers, and Parliaments in Central Asia. (Uppsala: Central Asia-Caucasus Institute and Silk Road Studies Program, 2006). (Reader)

Luca Anceschi, "Integrating domestic policies and foreign policy making: the cases of Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan," Central Asian Survey, Vol. 29, No. 2, (2010): 143-158. (Reader)

Short presentation readings:

Slavomír Horák, The Elite in Post-Soviet and Post-Niyazow Turkmenistan: Does Political Culture Form a Leader? Demokratizatsiya, Vol. 20, No. 4, 2012, pp. 371-385 (EBSCO). Mainka

Sebastien Peyrouse, "The Kazakh Neopatrimonial Regime: Balancing Uncertainities among the Family, Oligarchs and Technocrats," Demokratizatsiya, Vol. 20, No. 4, 2012, 345-370 (EBSCO). Killdau

  

Ideology and State-Building in Central Asia. (Šír)

Short Presentation Readings: 

Jan Šír, "Cult of Personality in Monumental Art and Architecture: The Case of Post-Soviet Turkmenistan," Acta Slavica Iaponica, Vol. 25, 203-220. Ang, Alexis

Slavomír Horák and Able Polese, "A Tale of Two Presidents: Personality Cult and Symbolic Nation-Building in Turkmenistan," Nationalities Papers, Vol. 43, No. 3, 457-478. Bobbi

 

Institutions

Formal Institutions: Constitutional Developments and State Institutions. (Šír)

Short Presentation Readings: Jan Šír, "Halk Maslahaty in the Context of the Constitutional Evolution of Post-Soviet Turkmenistan." Perspectives on European Politics and Society, 6:2, 321-330 

Annette Bohr, Turkmenistan: Power, Politics and Petro-Authoritarianism (London: The Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2016). Parts 1-3. Bill 

 

Economic and Social Transformation of Central Asia. (Tucker)

Scott Radnitz, Weapons of the Wealthy: Predatory Regimes and Elite-led Protests in Central Asia (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2010): 39-103.

Short Presentation Readings: Kathleen Kuehnast and Nora Dudwixk, "Better Hundred Friends Than Hundred Rubles? Social Networks in Transition - The Kyrgyz Republic, World Bank Economists Forum Vol. 2, 51-88.

 

 

 

 

 

Requirements to the exam
Last update: PhDr. Václav Lídl (17.12.2018)
  • 1 final interview (50%)

    Final interview with each student based on the readings and in-class topics. 

     

  • 1-2 short presentations on particular cases (40%)

    The short presentation will be based on additional assigned reading marked "Short presentation readings". The presenter will be asked to make a short outline (15-20 minutes) of the assigned reading. Analytical approach instead of simple reproduction of the text is expected. The position paper (about 750 to 1000 words) has to follow the short presentation for the particular class.

     

  • Activity in the class (10%)

    This part evaluates the activity of students in the classes. In case of substantial absence in the classes this percentage could be completely erased for particular student. 

     

  • Assessment

    1 (A) 100 - 91%
    2 (B) 90 - 81%
    3 (C) 80 - 71%

    4 (D) 70 – 61%

    5 (E) 60 – 51%

    6 (F) less than 50%

Syllabus
Last update: PhDr. Václav Lídl (10.12.2018)

Environment

8.10.  Space in Central Asia: Geography, Geopolitics, Geostrategy. (Lídl)

15.10.  Time in Central Asia: Implications of Central Asia's History for the Present. (Lídl)

22.10.  Powers in Central Asia: Dis-integration, Integration and Great-Powers. (Lídl)

29.10.    Screening of the film "In the Shadow of the Holy Book" (Šír)

Identity

5.11.    Role of Political Islam in Modern Central Asia. (Lídl)

Infrastructure

12.11.  Great Game for Central Asia's Energy Resources. (Lídl)

Institutions

19.11. Informal Institutions: Clans, Tribes and Nations. (Koutník)

Identity

26.11. Ideology and State-Building in Central Asia. (Šír) 

Institutions

3.12. Formal Institutions: Constitutional Developments and State Institutions. (Šír)

Infrastructure

17.12. Economic and Social Transformation of Central Asia. (Tucker)

 

 
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