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Course, academic year 2022/2023
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U.S. Foreign Policy during the Cold War - JMM346
Title: U.S. Foreign Policy during the Cold War
Guaranteed by: Department of North American Studies (23-KAS)
Faculty: Faculty of Social Sciences
Actual: from 2021
Semester: summer
E-Credits: 5
Examination process: summer s.:
Hours per week, examination: summer s.:1/1, Ex [HT]
Capacity: unknown / unknown (10)
Min. number of students: unlimited
Virtual mobility / capacity: no
State of the course: not taught
Language: English
Teaching methods: full-time
Note: course can be enrolled in outside the study plan
enabled for web enrollment
priority enrollment if the course is part of the study plan
Guarantor: doc. PhDr. Mgr. Francis Raška, Ph.D.
Examination dates   Schedule   Noticeboard   
Annotation -
Last update: doc. PhDr. Mgr. Francis Raška, Ph.D. (08.02.2021)
PURPOSE OF THE COURSE

This online seminar course (taught via ZOOM) seeks to help students gain a basic understanding of American foreign policy during the Cold War years. Students will be expected to analyze the similarities as well as the differences in policy approaches during different periods. Attendance and active class participation are mandatory. Students will be expected to read the assigned materials in order to be in a position to contribute to class discussions. All readings will be provided to students electronically. Students should ask themselves the following questions: Why did the Cold War break out? Where did American foreign policy succeed and where did it fail? How did American policy differ towards Europe and the developing world?


Aim of the course -
Last update: doc. PhDr. Mgr. Francis Raška, Ph.D. (08.02.2021)

PURPOSE OF THE COURSE

This online seminar course (taught via ZOOM) seeks to help students gain a basic understanding of American foreign policy during the Cold War years. Students will be expected to analyze the similarities as well as the differences in policy approaches during different periods. Attendance and active class participation are mandatory. Students will be expected to read the assigned materials in order to be in a position to contribute to class discussions. All readings will be provided to students electronically. Students should ask themselves the following questions: Why did the Cold War break out? Where did American foreign policy succeed and where did it fail? How did American policy differ towards Europe and the developing world?

Course completion requirements -
Last update: doc. PhDr. Mgr. Francis Raška, Ph.D. (08.02.2021)

Each student will be awarded a final mark based upon the following criteria:

                                                            

Class participation 30%

Term paper 50%

Oral examination 20%

 Grading is based on the Dean's Measure no. 20/2019: https://fsv.cuni.cz/deans-measure-no-20/2019

  • 91% and more   => A
  • 81-90%             => B
  • 71-80%             => C
  • 61-70%             => D
  • 51-60%             => E
  • 0-50%               => F
Literature -
Last update: doc. PhDr. Mgr. Francis Raška, Ph.D. (08.02.2021)

TEXTS

Harper, John Lamberton, The Cold War, Oxford, 2011.

 

Hixson, Walter L., American Foreign Relations: A New Diplomatic History, New York, 2016.

 

Westad, Odd Arne, The Cold War: A World History, New York, 2017.

Teaching methods -
Last update: Ing. Magda Pektorová (16.02.2021)

Attendance and participation in online class discussions via ZOOM are required and each student will be expected to write a paper containing 10 to 15 double-spaced pages. I will need to approve paper topics beforehand and I will expect students to let me know ahead of time by e-mail that they are unable to attend a particular online (ZOOM) class session. Unfortunately, I have not been happy with the number of unexcused absences by some students in the past as well as the repeated failure by some to read the assigned materials. Family and medical emergencies constitute legitimate grounds for absence. I will be stricter in this course as well as my other courses from now on. During the first weeks of the course, we will agree as a group on the date by which paper topics are to be submitted. If I am not satisfied that students are working on their papers, I may ask those in question to stop attending the course.

 

Francis Raska is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.
 
Topic: US Cold War Foreign Policy-Class on Wednesday, 17 February 2021, at 18.30
Time: Feb 17, 2021 06:30 PM Prague Bratislava
 
Join Zoom Meeting
 
Meeting ID: 861 6501 0243
Passcode: 277570
Syllabus -
Last update: doc. PhDr. Mgr. Francis Raška, Ph.D. (08.02.2021)

United States Foreign Policy during the Cold War

 

Course number: JMM346; JTM262

 

Instructor: doc. PhDr. Francis D. Raška, PhD.

 

E-mail: francisraska@gmail.com  

 

Office hours: Tuesdays from 3:30 PM until 4:30 PM on ZOOM

                      Wednesdays from 3:30 PM until 4:30 PM on ZOOM                        

 

PURPOSE OF THE COURSE

 

This online seminar course (taught via ZOOM) seeks to help students gain a basic understanding of American foreign policy during the Cold War years. Students will be expected to analyze the similarities as well as the differences in policy approaches during different periods. Attendance and active class participation are mandatory. Students will be expected to read the assigned materials in order to be in a position to contribute to class discussions. All readings will be provided to students electronically. Students should ask themselves the following questions: Why did the Cold War break out? Where did American foreign policy succeed and where did it fail? How did American policy differ towards Europe and the developing world?   

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND EVALUATION PROCEDURES

 

Each student will be awarded a final mark based upon the following criteria:

                                                            

Class participation 30%

Term paper 50%

Oral examination 20%

 Grading is based on the Dean's Measure no. 20/2019: https://fsv.cuni.cz/deans-measure-no-20/2019

  • 91% and more   => A
  • 81-90%             => B
  • 71-80%             => C
  • 61-70%             => D
  • 51-60%             => E
  • 0-50%               => F

 

Again, attendance and participation in online class discussions are required and each student will be expected to write a paper containing 10 to 15 double-spaced pages. I will need to approve paper topics beforehand and I will expect students to let me know ahead of time by e-mail that they are unable to attend a particular class session. Unfortunately, I have not been happy with the number of unexcused absences by some students in the past as well as the repeated failure by some to read the assigned materials. I will be stricter in this course as well as my other courses from now on. Family and medical emergencies constitute legitimate grounds for absence. During the first weeks of the course, we will agree as a group on the date by which the paper topics are to be submitted. If I am not satisfied with the progress of some students’ work, those involved may be asked to withdraw from the course. The papers themselves will be due at the end of the semester. The actual submission date for the papers will be set following a discussion by the group on the matter. Please note that students are expected to disclose all sources cited in the form of footnotes. Failure to do so constitutes plagiarism.Plagiarism will be punished by the disciplinary committee of the Faculty of Social Sciences. Unfortunately, circumstances no longer permit me to be as lenient as I was in the past with regard to papers submitted after the deadline. Papers submitted after the due date will be accepted only in the case of a documented medical, academic, or family emergency. In addition, I reserve the right not to accept papers from students who fail to attend class sessions and/or do not participate in class discussions. This translates into “No work, no credit.” I will insist that students let me know how they are getting on with their work throughout the course of the semester. I strongly urge students to have the assigned readings prepared on time in order to be in a position to participate in class discussions. Some time will be spent during the first session(s) discussing how to write papers. All students can expect to be examined orally on the topic of their essay at the end of the term. Questions asked during individual examination periods may involve the given topic as well as the research methods employed. Finally, I would like to stress that, in order for the course to be successful, we need to work together as a group of dedicated, mature scholars whose members communicate constructively with one another. Let the festival of learning begin! Good luck!

                        

TEXTS

 

Harper, John Lamberton, The Cold War, Oxford, 2011.

 

Hixson, Walter L., American Foreign Relations: A New Diplomatic History, New York, 2016.

 

Westad, Odd Arne, The Cold War: A World History, New York, 2017.

 

COURSE TOPICS AND ASSIGNED READINGS

 

 Background and Early Cold War

 

  1. Harper, John Lamberton, The Cold War, pp. 16-89.
  2. Harper, John Lamberton, The Cold War, pp. 90-109.

 

 

 

President Eisenhower and the Cold War

 

  1. Hixson, Walter L., American Foreign Relations: A New Diplomatic History, pp. 263-282.
  2. Westad, Odd Arne, The Cold War: A World History, pp. 183-231.

 

The 1960s

 

  1. Harper, John Lamberton, The Cold War, pp. 110-163.
  2. Westad, Odd Arne, The Cold War: A World History, pp. 261-338.

     

 

The Grim and Largely Unsuccessful 1970s

 

  1. Harper, John Lamberton, The Cold War, pp. 164-206.
  2. Hixson, Walter L., American Foreign Relations: A New Diplomatic History, pp. 349-360.
  3. Westad, Odd Arne, The Cold War: A World History, pp. 339-421.

 

The 1980s: Ronald Reagan, the Path to Victory, Endgames

 

 

  1. Hixson, Walter L., American Foreign Relations: A New Diplomatic History, pp. 361-392.
  2. Westad, Odd Arne, The Cold War: A World History, pp. 529-616.

 

 

 
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