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The Ambivalent Agency: Battered Women Who Kill in Turkey
Název práce v češtině: Ambivalentní jednání: Týrané ženy, které zabíjejí (Turecko)
Název v anglickém jazyce: The Ambivalent Agency: Battered Women Who Kill in Turkey
Klíčová slova: Battered Women Syndrome, battered women who kill, gender-based violence, agency, intersectionality, feminist poststructuralism
Klíčová slova anglicky: Battered Women Syndrome, battered women who kill, gender-based violence, agency, intersectionality, feminist poststructuralism
Akademický rok vypsání: 2020/2021
Typ práce: diplomová práce
Jazyk práce: angličtina
Ústav: Katedra sociologie (23-KS)
Vedoucí / školitel: doc. Mgr. Martin Hájek, Ph.D.
Řešitel: skrytý - zadáno vedoucím/školitelem
Datum přihlášení: 31.03.2021
Datum zadání: 31.03.2021
Datum a čas obhajoby: 31.01.2022 09:00
Místo konání obhajoby: Pekařská 16, JPEK212, 212, Malá učebna, 2.patro
Datum odevzdání elektronické podoby:03.01.2022
Datum proběhlé obhajoby: 31.01.2022
Oponenti: Mgr. Ema Hrešanová, Ph.D.
 
 
 
Kontrola URKUND:
Zásady pro vypracování
I will gather my data from about 10 in-depth interviews I will conduct, with respondents of various attitudes toward inter-gender violence. I will first provide a vignette for the interviewees to familiarize them with the phenomena, and ask open-ended questions, and provide narrative stimuli to assess their register of empathy toward women who killed their partners.
With this research, I hope to find out: how these women are perceived by Turkish society; the reason behind their perception; the empathy these women receive from some part of the public; for which part they empathize, i.e empathy with their suffering, empathy with their active resistance, empathy with the violence, or else.
Seznam odborné literatury
References:
Cetin, İ. (2015). Defining Recent Femicide in Modern Turkey: Revolt Killing. Journal of International Women's Studies, 16(2), 346-360 Available at: https://vc.bridgew.edu/jiws/vol16/iss2/22
Douglas, C. (2001). Femicide in Global Perspective. Off Our Backs, 31(11), 31-33. Retrieved February 22, 2021, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/20837482
Erden, G. ve Akdur, S. (2018). Türkiye’de kadına yönelik aile içi şiddet ve kadın cinayetleri. Klinik Psikoloji Dergisi, 2(3), 128-139
Güneş, G. ve Yıldırım, B. (2019). A Gender-Based War: An Assessment on Representation of Femicide in the Media. Toplum ve Sosyal Hizmet, 30(3), 936-964.
Herzog, S. (2006). Battered Women Who Kill. Homicide Studies, 10(4), 293-319. doi:10.1177/1088767906292643
Hollander, J. A. (2005). Challenging Despair. Violence Against Women, 11(6), 776–791. doi:10.1177/1077801205274808
Huss, M. T., Tomkins, A. J., Garbin, C. P., Schopp, R. F., & Kilian, A. (2006). Battered Women Who Kill Their Abusers. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 21(8), 1063-1080. doi:10.1177/0886260506290206
İnce Yenilmez, M., & Demir, M. H. (2016). The Challenge of Femicide and Violence Against Women in Turkey. International Journal of Contemporary Economics and Administrative Sciences, 6(1-2), 1-30.
KADIN CİNAYETLERİNİ DURDURACAĞIZ. (n.d.). Kadın Cinayetlerini Durduracağız Platformu. http://kadincinayetlerinidurduracagiz.net
Kramer, S. (2019). The power of critical discourse analysis: Investigating female-perpetrated sex abuse victim discourses. In Kramer S., Laher S., & Fynn A. (Eds.), Transforming Research Methods in the Social Sciences: Case Studies from South Africa (pp. 236-250). Johannesburg: Wits University Press. Retrieved February 22, 2021, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.18772/22019032750.20
McColgan, A. (1993). In Defence of Battered Women Who Kill. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, 13(4), 508-529. doi:10.1093/ojls/13.4.508
Potter, S. (2017). Using Critical Discourse Analysis to Understand Power, Personal Agency and Accountability in the Stanford Rape Case. Southern Journal of Linguistics, 41(2), 1-31.
Ray, L. J. (2011). Violence & Society. London: SAGE.
Ruiz-Junco, N. (2017). Advancing the sociology of empathy: A proposal. Symbolic Interaction, 40(3), 414-435. doi:10.1002/symb.306
Saunders, D. G., & Browne, A. (2000). Intimate Partner Homicide. Case Studies in Family Violence, 415-449. doi:10.1007/978-1-4615-4171-4_18
Smart, C. (2002). Feminism and the Power of Law. London: Taylor & Francis. ISBN 0-203-20616-9
Stein, M. L., & Miller, A. K. (2012). Distress resulting from perceivers’ own intimate partner violence experiences predicts culpability attributions toward a battered woman on trial for killing her abuser. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 27(13), 2527-2544. doi:10.1177/0886260512436388
Vetten, L. (1995). Intimate Femicide. Agenda: Empowering Women for Gender Equity, (27), 78-80. doi:10.2307/4065975
Wozniak, J. A., & McCloskey, K. A. (2010). Fact or fiction? Gender issues related to newspaper reports of intimate partner homicide. Violence Against Women, 16(8), 934-952. doi:10.1177/1077801210375977
Yalçınöz Uçan, B. (2019). Surviving Male Partner Violence in Turkey: Women's Stories of Powerlessness, Empowerment, and Recovery (Unpublished master's thesis). Boğaziçi University.
Předběžná náplň práce
The preliminary scope of work:
On January 6, Melek Ipek shot and killed her husband. A night before, her husband hit her with a rifle butt and threatened to kill her and their daughters, ages 9 and 7, according to her account in the indictment. By morning, after he went out and came back to the house, she had picked up a gun and killed him in a struggle. Melek Ipek was detained after calling the police to the scene. Later, she went on trial and was charged with murder. She is now facing a life sentence. Melek Ipek’s case is not the only one; there have been 4 other accounts of women who killed their partner/ex-partner, who have been physically or psychologically violent towards them. They have all been charged with murder. Some are still in prison, some were released later. In patriarchal societies, the stereotype of women tends to be passive rather than active. By killing within a patriarchal system, these women who have killed their male aggressors show an act against these stereotypes, which brings the question of who is empathy-deserving and who is not worthy of it.
People engage in empathy through performances, which requires ‘empathy-deserving’ situations. In this research, I aim to examine how human interpretation and cultural norms shape the intersubjective relationship people have toward women who killed their partners. My main goal is to investigate how people in Turkish society construct and justify their empathy towards women who have killed their partners/ex-partners; how do people acknowledge and justify their empathy or a lack of it?
Předběžná náplň práce v anglickém jazyce
The preliminary scope of work:
On January 6, Melek Ipek shot and killed her husband. A night before, her husband hit her with a rifle butt and threatened to kill her and their daughters, ages 9 and 7, according to her account in the indictment. By morning, after he went out and came back to the house, she had picked up a gun and killed him in a struggle. Melek Ipek was detained after calling the police to the scene. Later, she went on trial and was charged with murder. She is now facing a life sentence. Melek Ipek’s case is not the only one; there have been 4 other accounts of women who killed their partner/ex-partner, who have been physically or psychologically violent towards them. They have all been charged with murder. Some are still in prison, some were released later. In patriarchal societies, the stereotype of women tends to be passive rather than active. By killing within a patriarchal system, these women who have killed their male aggressors show an act against these stereotypes, which brings the question of who is empathy-deserving and who is not worthy of it.
People engage in empathy through performances, which requires ‘empathy-deserving’ situations. In this research, I aim to examine how human interpretation and cultural norms shape the intersubjective relationship people have toward women who killed their partners. My main goal is to investigate how people in Turkish society construct and justify their empathy towards women who have killed their partners/ex-partners; how do people acknowledge and justify their empathy or a lack of it?
 
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